Jump to content
Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
UM-Bot

Pharaoh's curse or coincidence ?

Recommended Posts

UM-Bot

user posted image rScientists who recently conducted a high-tech examination of King Tut's mummy insist they don't believe in the "Curse of the Pharaohs." Still, some awfully strange things happened when the team X-rayed the boy king's body with a medical CT scanning machine. On the way to the Egyptian site, one researcher's vehicle nearly hit a child. Then a huge storm hit. The CT machine, usually reliable, wouldn't work at first. And when researchers finally began the CT scan, one scientist came down with such a violent coughing attack he had to leave. "It was a very interesting moment, and a very scary moment at the same time," said Cairo University radiologist Dr. Ashraf Selim. But Selim added: "I don't believe in the curse. I'm a scientific man." National Geographic, which helped fund the study, announced preliminary results last year. On Monday, Selim detailed the findings for the first time at a scientific setting -- a meeting at McCormick Place of the Radiological Society of North America. King Tutankhamun was about 9 years old when he was crowned around 1332 B.C. It was the golden age of pharaohs, and Egypt was a mighty empire.

Unlike other royal tombs, Tut's burial chamber remained undisturbed through the ages. When British archeologist Howard Carter finally discovered it in 1922, the tomb was filled with 5,000 breathtaking artifacts, including jewels, statues, magical amulets, furniture and a solid gold coffin. But an inscription on the tomb supposedly warned: "Death shall come on swift wings to him that disturbs the peace of the king."

IPB Image\ View: Full Article | Source: Chicago Sun Times

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Krayt12

Ive heard about this. When it was first discovered man were there a lot of dyin! 1 person got bitten by a Mosquito then Died, another died from causes unknown, someone's dad comitited sucide + someone's Canary got eaten by a python (Python is also a Symbal of Pharoah Tutankamun...?) and more! cant fully remember it all though. Hey, i believe in curses since i heard about Tutankamun...'s curse! And somin bout these odd masks...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mike8272

Well it all comes down to is what do you believe if your a scientist then you will look on it as coincidence wereas if your more religious and your eyes more open to things that aren't just proved by scientific facts or facts in general placed in front of your face then you probably would believe in the curse.

Were do i stand?

I personally believe there is a curse or what appears to be one. Now if we look at the ancient egyptians they built these great pyramids, created these great confins of great elegance, and look around the world at the time for evidence of a culture that was on the same level or created things as great, i'm pretty sure Britian wasn't nor many other cultures not for many hundreds of years. Even during the crusades they barely had things as elegant as the Egyptians had.

So what am i trying to say?

We all heard of aliens or advanced civilasations being involved with them, maybe even disappearing. But for me i believe if there was advanced race or aliens invovled maybe this can account for the 'curses'.

But as i said at the start depends on which side of the fence you lay on these topics those who need hard evidence and proof in front of them, and those who believe and dson't need hard evidence. For instance my sig it is a TV series but Mulder didn't need hard evidence to believe, Scully wanted hard evidence and had to see something to believe. Same thing here.

I believe something is cursed on this coffin, but what it is is another matter is it a advanced security feature? or something related to a voodoo style thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the lastninja

did any one find the big round thingy grey looking with lots of symbols on it?lol.the air would have been very stale in the chamber and that would have been a breeding ground for germs so there would have been a high risk of illness from just breathing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dakotabre

His head was cut off, his body cut in two, his joints had been disconnected....

Was this the norm for burial back then? Were other Pharoahs found in pieces like TUT?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mike8272

Well all i know is what most people know about the organs thing, but dismembering i don't think was common between burried pharoah's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
apharaoh
His head was cut off, his body cut in two, his joints had been disconnected....

Was this the norm for burial back then? Were other Pharoahs found in pieces like TUT?

Death shall come on swift wings to him who disturbs the peace of the King

1922, the journalists reported that an inscription near the door of King Tutankhamen's tomb read, "Death shall come on swift wings to him who disturbs the peace of the King". The Curse seemingly proved itself to be real, when all of the archaeologists and workers who desecrated the tomb of Tutankhamen were reported to have died horrible and early deaths.

By November 1922, the archaeologist Howard Carter had spent seven frustrating years looking for King Tut's tomb in Luxor's Valley of the Kings. Eventually, his workers dug down 4 metres beneath the tomb of Rameses VI, where they found an entrance in the rock that led to a passageway 3 metres high and 2 metres wide. They cleaned out the rubble, and at the twelfth step, they found the top of a sealed stone doorway. This was exciting news, so Howard Carter immediately invited his financier, Lord Carnarvon, to come to the site to be present for the opening of the tomb. On the evening of November 24, Carter and Carnarvon were present when all the rubble was removed to reveal the stone door with the seal of King Tutankhamen in the plaster. This door was opened. It took another two days of hard work to clear another descending stairway full of rubble. This time they found a second door, which had the seals of both the Royal Necropolis and Tutankhamen. The workers made a hole through the stone door and Carter looked in with the light of a candle. Lord Carnarvon asked, "Can you see anything?" Carter replied, "Wonderful things". There was magnificent treasure in the anteroom - and even more in the inner room, which took them another three months to get to. Lord Carnarvon himself opened this inner door on February 17th, 1923. King Tut's mummified remains were inside three coffins. The outer two coffins were made of hammered gold fitted to wooden frames, while the innermost coffin was made of solid gold. The body was originally inspected by Howard Carter’s team , though they were primarily interested in recovering the jewelry and amulets from the body. To remove the objects from the body, which in many cases were stuck fast by the hardened embalming resins used, Carter's team cut up the mummy into various pieces: the arms and legs were detached, the torso cut in half and the head was severed. Hot knives were used to remove it from the golden mask to which it was cemented by resin.

Lord Carnarvon died on April 6, 1923

The 5th Earl was an enthusiastic amateur Egyptologist, undertaking in 1907 to sponsor the excavation of the royal tombs at Thebes by Howard Carter. It was in 1922 that they together opened the tomb of Tutankhamun in the Valley of the Kings, exposing treasures unsurpassed in the history of archaeology. Several months later, Carnarvon was found dead at the Winter Palace Hotel.His death is most probably explained by blood poisoning (progressing to pneumonia) after accidentally shaving a mosquito bite infected with erysipelas. At 1:55 a.m., the lights in Cairo (where he died in a hospital) went out and plunged the people into darkness. Reportedly, at the same time, back at his home, his dog gave out a great howl and died.[citation needed]

King Tut's treasures went on exhibition to various museums around the world. When Arthur C. Mace from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and George Benedite of The Louvre in Paris each died after showing the treasures of King Tut.

Tut was the son of Akhenaten and his minor wife Kiya. Queen Kiya's title was "Greatly Beloved Wife of Akhenaten" so it is possible she could have borne him an heir. Supporting this theory, images on the tomb wall in the tomb of Akhenaten show that a royal fan bearer standing next to Kiya's death bed, fanning what is either a princess or most likely a wet nurse holding a baby, which would indicate that the wet nurse was holding the boy-king-to-be.

Tut Pharaoh of the Eighteenth dynasty (ruled 1333 BC – 1324 BC), during the period of Egyptian history known as the New Kingdom. His original name, Tutankhaten, meant "Living Image of Aten", while Tutankhamun meant "Living Image of Amun". He is possibly also the Nibhurrereya of the Amarna letters. He was likely the 18th dynasty king 'Rathotis', who according to Manetho, an ancient historian, had reigned for 9 years—a figure which conforms exactly with Flavius Josephus' generally accurate version of Manetho's Epitome.[2]

In historical terms, Tutankhamun is of only moderate significance, and most of his modern popularity stems from the fact that his tomb in the Valley of the Kings was discovered almost completely intact. However, he is also significant as a figure who managed the beginning of the transition from the heretical Atenism of his predecessors Akhenaten and Smenkhkare back to the familiar Egyptian religion. As Tutankhamun began his reign at age 9, his vizier and eventual successor Ay was probably making most of the important political decisions during Tutankhamun's reign. Nonetheless, Tutankhamun is, in modern times, one of the most famous of the Pharaohs, and the only one to have a nickname in popular culture ("King Tut").

His age at death was estimated at 19 years, based on physical developments that set upper and lower limits to his age. The king had been in general good health, and there were no signs of any major infectious disease or malnutrition during childhood. He was slight of build, and was roughly 170 cm (5'7") tall. He had large front incisor teeth and the overbite characteristic of the rest of the Thutmosid line of kings to which he belonged. He also had a pronounced dolichocephalic (elongated) skull, though it was within normal bounds and highly unlikely to have been pathologic in cause. Given the fact that many of the royal depictions of Akhenaten (possibly his father, certainly a relation), often featured an elongated head, it is likely an exaggeration of a family trait, rather than a distinct abnormality. The research also showed that the pharaoh had cleft palate.[6] A slight bend to his spine was also found, but the scientists agreed that there was no associated evidence to suggest that it was pathological in nature, and that it was much more likely to have been caused during the embalming process.

A now-famous letter to the Hittite king Suppiluliuma I from a widowed queen of Egypt, explaining her problems and asking for one of his sons as a husband, has been attributed to Ankhesenamun (among others). Suspicious of this good fortune, Suppiluliumas I first sent a messenger to make inquiries on the truth of the young queen's story. After reporting her plight back to Suppiluliuma I, he sent his son, Zannanza, accepting her offer. However, Zananza got no further than the border before he was killed, according to the Hittite archives. If Ankhesenamun were the queen in question, and his death a murder, it was probably at the orders of either Horemheb or Ay, who both had the opportunity and the motive to kill him

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.