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War Eagle

Native American Culture.

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SilverCougar
You speak of your personal view of one tribe, and this puts the blinders on me? Nothing you have said about this group has had a major impact on our environment!!

I (normally) would find your "cherokee" comment desperate, but instead, I have to agree with it- I find those people who claim without warrent pathetic- but its only b/c that is what the've been told, perhaps. We see that A LOT here!!

Cheif Martin asked a group of people how many were "cherokee" blood... and everyone except for 5 raised their hands-this was out of 60 people. When Cheif broke it down by lineage, it boiled down to only two could claim genuine lineage...His grandson, and myself. -- To claim this, I would have to be more than 1/16 degree of "Cherokee blood." My grandfather was cherokee born in western N. Carolina (cherokee county) and his parents are/were registered by BIA on the Baker's Role 24' (eastern band division N.C). The broken form name ended as Duke.. that's enough info.

He marries "white" woman from nearby county- gave birth to no one other than my moma later...who had me eventually.

Why do they always use "cherokee?" I have no idea, nor do I care to know.

A. It's not my "personal" veiw of one tribe. I'ts being told, to my face directly, by not just one tribe, but several up here. And yes, what they were doing did have an impact. Incase you missed it, I shall repeat myself.

The women were stripping the bark from hundreds of cedar trees for basket making to sell. The trees that had their bark stripped died. Which was having such a huge effect, that the government needed to put enviromental law enforcers in the reservations to stop people from desimating achers of cedar forests.

Not to mention the Pulayup(ggrragspelling) nation bulldozed miles and miles of their land for strip malls, appartment complexes, casinos... Yep.. that didn't harm the enviroment at all.

But like I said.. *not* every tribe is like this... many do try to live with nature. But not all...

As for being offended by my cherokee musing. That's your problem. I already explained to fishka what was going on. It was a simple case of in the matter of two weeks, everyone with a native harratige line that I have met.. was cherokee, or atleast claimed to be. If they are.. they are.. if not then who well. They still told me they were. I'm not going to scrutinize. You can be proud of it. Really.. it's good to be proud of one's herratige. But you're crossing the border of being forcefull about it, which really makes people roll their eyes and tone you out then listen to you. Like I said about my one classmate, the woman is overly forcefull about her harratage (and it does happen to be cherokee). And it's nervegrateing.

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Radian
I am having a hard time trying to work out what "white man" has done so fantastically that you cant see the faults right there, I'm with sunny on this open your eyes, do a lil research into how we have treated civilisations throughout history.

I am English and to be frank I'm ashamed of it at times, our past is littered with failure and disgrace, our treatment of others have left a lot to be desired.

These people who you say have no respect for the earth...wth, we have no respect for the earth, just look at the global warming taken place that is evidence enough that we have not taken care of the one this that brings us life, if everyone lived their life with the simple pleasures that his wonderful civilisation had things would have been different, respect for nature for a start and the appreciation for all things living.

Reality for me is turning the news on every day to see how white man is blowing this world up, doing what they do best interfering, causing threat, playing the old card of who is the most powerful...sad, very sad, we dont need a asteroid to hit the earth or any other natural disaster...the ignorance of a powerful few will do it for us.

I know what kind of life i would prefer..a peaceful one in harmony with the earth, i think the problem is people have become so accustomed to the war and death they dont see an end to it, they have no realisation that things could be different if more tolerance was applied, but its not as simple as that because people dont want to know or learn, unfortunately this world is full of power hungry, selfish people and even when you only have a few of them they still contaminate the minds of others.

I have to say it's not everyday a person reads a post this raw, and so emotionally impacting! You are a very powerful person, Fishka. :tu:

btw,

We should be PROUD of whoever, whatever we are--

The only thing that we should be shameful of- is NOT learning from those mistakes that were made by our very forefathers.

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Radian
As for being offended by my cherokee musing. That's your problem. I already explained to fishka what was going on. It was a simple case of in the matter of two weeks, everyone with a native harratige line that I have met.. was cherokee, or atleast claimed to be. If they are.. they are.. if not then who well. They still told me they were. I'm not going to scrutinize. You can be proud of it. Really.. it's good to be proud of one's herratige. But you're crossing the border of being forcefull about it, which really makes people roll their eyes and tone you out then listen to you. Like I said about my one classmate, the woman is overly forcefull about her harratage (and it does happen to be cherokee). And it's nervegrateing.

LOL! Your original intentions were to offend me- Instead of being offended, I actually agreed with you. Life's a riot, isn't it?

Please show me where I have been "forcefull" or "crossing the border" with my heritage? Nevermind, you can't, you're a blatent lie. I mentioned it *only* in this particular thread & when it was appropiate.

And any "tone" that I dish- it's to you specific-- that I can assure you. Roll your eyes!! ROLL ROLL ROLL AWAY! :rolleyes:

(ugh)

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SilverCougar

My origonal intent was not to offend. *shrugs* It was to point out that to tell someone they have their blinders on, when you had shown to have a set on yourself...

And the fact that you keep going on about your harratage, and how one proves how one is... borderlines forcefull.

Never once had I risen my voice... or talked in a manner anymore then either in calmness or curiousness. As I pointed out to Fishka.. It was a curious thing that was happening to me.

Never once did I say it was a bad thing that the past two weeks everyone of any degree of native american herratige that I've come across and met was cherokee.. I had simply stopped and mused about how curious and odd that was. Next thing I know.. you're jumping down my throat about how offensive that was.

How is it offensive?

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Radian

Im not jumping down your throat cougar- Maybe it's feeling boxed in with those who do claim falsley and such as this classmate of yours.. and I came across that way defending myself. Or, feeling I have to justify my self with this issue.

I understood where you were coming from on the issue.. Like I said many around (here) claim to be lineage of this particular tribe and are not at all..

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Radian

source:

http://www.firstpeople.us/FP-Html-Legends/...-Algonquin.html

Ableegumooch, The Lazy Rabbit

An Algonquin Legend

In the Old Time, Ableegumooch the rabbit was Glooscap's forest guide, and helped wayfarers lost in the woods. However, as time went on, the people and animals learned to find their own way in the forest and didn't need the rabbit's services as much.

Ableegumooch grew fat and lazy. If there was something easy and fun to do, he did it. If a thing were difficult or tiring, he did not. But that is no way to keep a wigwam stocked with food.

Often, poor old Noogumee (a term of respect amongst Indians for any elderly female), his grandmother, with whom he lived, had to hunt for food herself, or they would have gone hungry. And no matter how much she scolded him, Ableegumooch refused to change his ways.

Glooscap, far away in his lodge on Blomidon, saw that the rabbit was becoming a thoroughly useless creature. He must be warned against the dangers of laziness. So, wasting no time, Glooscap descended from his lodge to the beach in three huge strides, launched his canoe, and paddled across the Bay of Fundy to the shore near the rabbit's home.

It was a fine bright morning, the air cool and tasting of salt, as it always does in the Maritime Provinces. And presently along hopped the rabbit, singing with fine spirit:

"It's a lovely day to do nothing, nothing, all the day through!"

He paid no attention to the tasty leaves and berries he might have been gathering for dinner. He was much more interested in watching other people work. There was Miko the squirrel scampering up the big maple tree, his cheeks bulged out with nuts, pausing only long enough to scold Ableegumooch for coming too near his storehouse.

There was Mechipchamooech the bumble bee, busy at the goldenrod, gathering honey for his hive. And there was Teetees the blue jay, flying worms to his family in the big pine. It was all so interesting that Ableegumooch stopped beside a stately fir tree to enjoy the scene. Suddenly behind him, he heard a voice.

"Ableegumooch, be careful!"

The rabbit jumped and whirled about, but there was nobody there. The voice spoke again, from somewhere over his head.

"Take care, Ableegumooch, or your lazy ways will bring you pain and sorrow."

The rabbit looked up and saw the fir tree shake like a leaf in a storm, yet not a breath of wind stirred. Frightened out of his wits, he ran--and he never stopped running until he was safe at home, where he told his grandmother what had happened.

"Glooscap has given you a warning," said his grand mother. "Be sure to obey him, grandson, or you will be sorry."

The rabbit's legs were still trembling from fright and exertion, and he promised at once that he would take care to mend his lazy ways in future. And indeed, for a while, he went busily about his hunting and kept the wigwam well stocked with food. But, when autumn came, he grew lazy again and went back to his old careless ways.

"It's a lovely day to do nothing, nothing, all the day through!"

So sang Ableegumooch as he sauntered through the glory of autumn trees. Noogumee begged and scolded and pleaded, but he continued to spend more time visiting his neighbors than gathering food. One day, when winter had come to the land, he came to the wigwam of Keoonik the otter. Keoonik politely asked him to dine, and the rabbit promptly accepted. Keoonik turned to his elderly house keeper and addressed her in the usual native's fashion:

"Noogumee, prepare the meal."

Then he took some fishhooks and went off, the rabbit hopping along behind, curious to see what he was going to do. Keoonik sat on the snowy bank of the river and slid down an icy path into the water. In a moment, he reappeared with a string of eels which he carried to his grandmother, and she promptly cooked them for dinner.

"Gracious!" thought Ableegumooch. "If that isn't an easy way to get a living. I can do that as well as Keoonik," and he invited the otter to be his guest at dinner on the following day. Then he hurried home.

"Come," he said to his grandmother, "we are going to move our lodge down to the river." And in spite of all she could say, he insisted on moving it. Noogumee reminded him that the wigwam was empty of food, and he ought to be out hunting, but Ableegumooch paid no attention. He was busy making a slide like Keoonik's. The weather was cold, so all he had to do was pour water down the snowy bank, where it soon froze, and there was his fishing slide. Early next day, the guest arrived. When it was time for dinner, Ableegumooch said to his grandmother:

"Noogumee, prepare the meal."

"There is nothing to prepare," said she, sadly.

"Oh, I will see to that," said the rabbit with a confident laugh, and he took his place at the top of the slide to go fishing. When he tried to push off, however, he found it was not so easy. His coat was rough and bulky and dry, not smooth and slippery like the otter's. He had to wriggle and push with his heels until at last he slid down and plunged into the water. The cold took his breath quite away, and he suddenly remembered he was unable to swim. Struggling and squealing, he thought no more of fishing, for he was in great danger of drowning.

"What on earth is the matter with him?" Keoonik asked the grandmother.

"I suppose he has seen someone else do that," sighed Noogumee, "and he thinks he can do it too."

Keoonik helped the freezing, half-drowned rabbit out of the water and, since there was nothing to eat, went home hungry and disgusted.

But do you think that cold bath cured Ableegumooch? Not at all. The very next day, as he ran idly through the forest, he came to the lodge of some female woodpeckers. He was delighted when these woodpeckers invited him to dinner.

He watched eagerly to see how they found food.

One of the woodpeckers took a dish, went up the side of an old beech tree and quickly dug out a plentiful supply of food, which was cooked and placed before the rabbit.

"My, oh my!" thought Ableegumooch. "How easily some people get a living. What is to prevent me from getting mine in that fashion?" And he told the woodpeckers they must come and dine with him.

On the day following, they appeared at the rabbit's lodge and Ableegumooch said to his grandmother importantly:

"Noogumee, prepare the meal."

"You foolish rabbit," said she, "there is nothing to prepare."

"Make the fire," said the rabbit grandly, "and I shall see to the rest."

He took the stone point from an eel spear and fastened it on his head in imitation of a woodpecker's bill, then climbed a tree and began knocking his head against it. Soon his head was bruised and bleeding, and he lost his hold and fell to the earth with a tremendous crash. The woodpeckers could not keep from laughing.

"Pray what was he doing up there?"

"I suppose he has seen someone else do that," said Noogumee, shaking her head, "and thinks he can do it too." And she advised them to go home, as there would be no food for them there that day.

Now, sore as he was, you would certainly think the rabbit had learned his lesson. Yet, a day or two later, he was idling in the woods as usual when he came upon Mooin the Bear, who invited him to dinner. He was greatly impressed at the way in which the bear got his meal. Mooin merely took a sharp knife and cut small pieces off the soles of his feet. These he placed in a kettle on the fire, and in a short while they enjoyed a delicious meal.

"This must be the easiest way of all to get a dinner," marveled Ableegumooch, and he invited Mooin to dine with him next day. Now what the rabbit did not know was that the bears preserve food on their feet. They press ripe blueberries with their paws and, after the cakes have dried upon them, cut bits off to eat. The silly rabbit thought Mooin had actually cut pieces off his paws!

At the appointed time, Ableegumooch ordered his grand mother to prepare the meal, and when she said there was nothing to prepare, he told her to put the kettle on and he would do the rest. Then he took a stone knife and began to cut at his feet as he had seen Mooin do. But oh dear me, it hurt. It hurt dreadfully! With tears streaming down his cheeks, he hacked and hacked, first at one foot and then at the other. Mooin the Bear was greatly astonished.

"What on earth is the fellow trying to do?" he asked.

Noogumee shook her head dismally.

"It is the same old thing. He has seen someone else do this."

"Well!" said Mooin crossly, "It is most insulting to be asked to dinner and get nothing to eat. The trouble with that fellow is-- he's lazy!" and he went home in a huff.

Then at last, Ableegumooch, nursing his sore feet, remembered what Glooscap had said. All at once, he saw how silly he had been.

"Oh dear!" he said. "My own ways of getting food are hard, but others' are harder. I shall stick to my own in the future," and he did.

From then on, the wigwam of Ableegumooch and his grandmother was always well stored with food, winter and summer, and though he still sings, his song has changed:

"It's a wiser thing to be busy, busy, Constantly!

And far away on Blomidon, Glooscap, seeing his foolish rabbit mend his ways at last, set a light to his pipe and smoked contentedly.

Interesting native history link:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/goldrush/sfea...natives_02.html

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War Eagle

One thing is certain Brave New Word is smack on target when he said what a paradise the Americas would have been like to live in before the invasion.

I don't know if it's just childhood memories coming back to haunt me or what, but i cant help feeling for how these proud and beautiful people and how they must of felt and what they must have gone through in being taken/pushed or even torn away from the land and way of life that they knew for so long.

I always used to say to myself as a kid growing up in a small town...''How would WE have felt if we had our homes, farms and even businesses which our parents and or ourselves worked hard for all our lives slowly but surly taken from under us and pushed aside and into the streets and or gutters of our 'concrete jungles'

I don't really blame any one generation for their slow demise especially the generation now. That would be like the generations hundreds of yrs from now blaming all of us for the total environmental destruction of our planet(if we make it that far) so 'the very least' we can do now for these beautiful people is acknowledge and preserve their proud and unique history as much as possible.

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Radian

Native American Legends

Honeyed Words Can't Sweeten Evil

An Algonquin Legend

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Big Blue Heron was standing in the marsh looking at his reflection in the water. He raised his black-crested head to listen.

Two little White Weasels had come along to the river. They were mother and son. When they saw Blue Heron, they stopped to look.

'What a beautiful big bird-person!' said the son.

'He is called Blue Heron. He carries his head high!'

'Yes, Mother, he is tall as a tree. Were I so tall, I could carry you across this swift river.'

Blue Heron was pleased to hear himself so praised. He liked to hear other say that he was big.

He bent down low and spoke to the two. 'I will help you go across. Come down to where you see that old tree lying in the stream. I will lie down in the water at the end and put my bill deep into the bank on the other side. You two run across the tree. Then use my body as a bridge and you will get to the other side.'

They all went to the old tree lying in the water. Blue Heron lay down in the water at the end and stuck his bill deep into the bank on the other side. Mother and son White Weasel ran lightly and quickly across the log, over Blue Heron, and were safe and dry on the other side. They thanked Blue Heron and said they would tell all the persons in the woods how fine Blue Heron was. Then they went on their way.

Old Wolf had been standing on the riverbank watching how the weasels had gotten across.

'What a fine way it would be for me to cross the river. I am old and my bones ache.'

When Blue Heron came back to the marsh, Wolf said to him, 'Now I know why you Blue Herons are in the marsh - so you can be a bridge for persons to cross the rive. I want to go across, but I am old and my bones hurt. Lie down in the water for me so I can cross.'

Blue Heron was angry. He didn't like being called a bridge. Old Wolf saw he had spoken foolish words and decided to use honeyed words.

'You are big and strong, Blue Heron, and that is why you body is such a fine bridge. You could carry me across like a feather.'

Blue Heron smiled at Wolf and said, 'Old Wolf, get on my back and I'll carry you across.

Wolf grinned from ear to ear thinking how easily he had tricked Blue Heron.

He jumped on the bird's back and Heron went into the rushing river. When he got to the middle, he stopped.

'Friend Wolf,' said Blue Heron, 'you made a mistake. I am not strong enough to carry you across. For that you need two herons. I can carry you only halfway. Now you must get another heron to carry you the rest of the way.'

He gave his body a strong twist and Wolf fell into the water.

'You wait here, Wolf, for another heron to come and carry you to the other side.' Then he flew into the marsh.

The water ran swiftly. No heron came, so where did Wolf go ? To the bottom of the river...

Since that day, no wolf has ever trusted a heron.

http://www.firstpeople.us/FP-Html-Legends/...-Algonquin.html

Edited by Sunny98

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Fairy bye bye

*coughs* come on guys harmony and tolerance remember.

I hope i speak for a lot of people on here that i wouldnt want to see this thread being used as a debating ground for herritage, Sunny is what she is Silver, i havent seen her being forcefull with this information, like she pointed out its relevent in here due to the context of the thread.

If im wrong please feel free to beat me with a stick *leaves sticks*

Edited by fishka

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Radian

ican Legends :: Blackfoot

Native American Legends

Blood Clot Boy

A Blackfoot Legend

Once there was an old man and woman whose three daughters married a young man. The old people lived in a lodge by themselves.

The young man was supposed to hunt buffalo, and feed them all. Early in the morning the young man invited his father-in-law to go out with him to kill buffalo. The old man was then directed to drive the buffalo through a gap where the young man stationed himself to kill them as they went by. As soon as the buffalo were killed, the young man requested his father-in-law to go home.

He said, "You are old. You need not stay here. Your daughters can bring you some meat." Now the young man lied to his father-in-law; for when the meat was brought to his lodge, he ordered his wives not to give meat to the old folks. Yet one of the daughters took pity on her parents, and stole meat for them. The way in which she did this was to take a piece of meat in her robe, and as she went for water drop it in front of her father's lodge.

Now every morning the young man invited his father-in-law to hunt buffalo; and, as before, sent him away and refused to permit his daughters to furnish meat for the old people. On the fourth day, as the old man was returning, he saw a clot of blood in the trail, and said to himself, "Here at least is something from which we can make soup."

In order that he might not be seen by his son-in-law, he stumbled, and spilt the arrows out of his quiver. Now, as he picked up the arrows, he put the clot of blood into the quiver. Just then the young man came up and demanded to know what it was he picked up. The old man explained that he had just stumbled, and was picking up his arrows.

So the old man took the clot of blood home and requested his wife to make blood-soup. When the pot began to boil, the old woman heard a child crying. She looked all around, but saw nothing. Then she heard it again. This time it seemed to be in the pot. She looked in quickly, and saw a boy baby: so she lifted the pot from the fire, took the baby out and wrapped it up.

Now the young man, sitting in his lodge, heard a baby crying, and said, "Well, the old woman must have a baby." Then he sent his oldest wife over to see the old woman's baby, saying, "If it is a boy, I will kill it." The woman came into look at the baby, but the old woman told her it was a girl. When the young man heard this, he did not believe it.

So he sent each wife in turn; but they all came back with the same report. Now the young man was greatly pleased, because he could look forward to another wife. So he sent over some old bones, that soup might be made for the baby. Now, all this happened in the morning.

That night the baby spoke to the old man, saying, "You take me up and hold me against each lodge-pole in succession." So the old man took up the baby, and, beginning at the door, went around in the direction of the sun, and each time that he touched a pole the baby became larger. When halfway around, the baby was so heavy that the old man could hold him no longer. So he put the baby down in the middle of the lodge, and, taking hold of his head, moved it toward each of the poles in succession, and, when the last pole was reached, the baby had become a very fine young man.

Then this young man went out, got some black flint [obsidian] and, when he got to the lodge, he said to the old man, "I am the Smoking-Star. I came down to help you. When I have done this, I shall return."

Now, when morning came, Blood-Clot (the name his father gave him) arose and took his father out to hunt. They had not gone very far when they killed a scabby cow. Then Blood-Clot lay down behind the cow and requested his father to wait until the son-in-law came to join him. He also requested that he stand his ground and talk back to the son-in-law.

Now, at the usual time in the morning, the son-in-law called at the lodge of the old man, but was told that he had gone out to hunt. This made him very angry, and he struck at the old woman, saying, "I have a notion to kill you." So the son-in-law went out.

Now Blood-Clot had directed his father to be eating a kidney when the son-in-law approached. When the son-in-law came up and saw all this, he was very angry. He said to the old man, "Now you shall die for all this."

"Well," said the old man, "you must die too, for all that you have done."

Then the son-in-law began to shoot arrows at the old man, and the latter becoming frightened called on Blood-Clot for help. Then Blood-Clot sprang up and upbraided the son-in-law for his cruelty. "Oh," said the son-in-law, "I was just fooling." At this Blood-Clot shot the son-in-law through and through.

Then Blood-Clot said to his father, "We will leave this meat here: it is not good. Your son-in-law's house is full of dried meat. Which one of your daughters helped you?"

The old man told him that it was the youngest.

Then Blood-Clot went to the lodge, killed the two older women, brought up the body of the son-in-law, and burned them together. Then he requested the younger daughter to take care of her old parents, to be kind to them, etc. "Now," said Blood-Clot, "I shall go to visit the other Indians."

So he started out, and finally came to a camp. He went into the lodge of some old women, who were very much surprised to see such a fine young man. They said, "Why do you come here among such old women as we? Why don't you go where there are young people?"

"Well," said Blood-Clot, "give me some dried meat." Then the old women gave him some meat, but no fat. "Well," said Blood-Clot, "you did not give me the fat to eat with my dried meat."

"Hush!" said the old women. "You must not speak so loud. There are bears here that take all the fat and give us the lean, and they will kill you, if they hear you."

"Well," said Blood-Clot, "I will go out tomorrow, do some butchering, and get some fat." Then he went out through the camp, telling all the people to make ready in the morning, for he intended to drive the buffalo over [the drive].

Now there were some bears who ruled over this camp. They lived in a bear-lodge [painted lodge], and were very cruel. When Blood-Clot had driven the buffalo over, he noticed among them a scabby cow. He said, "I shall save this for the old women."

Then the people laughed, and said, "Do you mean to save that poor old beast? It is too poor to have fat." However, when it was cut open it was found to be very fat. Now, when the bears heard the buffalo go over the drive, they as usual sent out two bears to cut off the best meat, especially all the fat; but Blood-Clot had already butchered the buffalo, putting the fat upon sticks. He hid it as the bears came up.

Also he had heated some stones in a fire. When they told him what they wanted, he ordered them to go back. Now the bears were very angry, and the chief bear and his wife came up to fight, but Blood-Clot killed them by throwing hot stones down their throats.

Then he went down to the lodge of the bears and killed all, except one female who was about to become a mother. She pleaded so pitifully for her life, that he spared her. If he had not done this, there would have been no more bears in the world.

The lodge of the bears was filled with dried meat and other property. Also all the young women of the camp were confined there. Blood-Clot gave all the property to the old women, and set free all the young women. The bears' lodge he gave to the old women. It was a bear painted lodge.

"Now," said Blood-Clot, "I must go on my travels."

He came to a camp and entered the lodge of some old women. When these women saw what a fine young man he was, they said, "Why do you come here, among such old women? Why do you not go where there are younger people?"

"Well," said he, "give me some meat." The old women gave him some dried meat, but no fat.

Then he said, "Why do you not give me some fat with my meat?"

"Hush!" said the women, "you must not speak so loud. There is a snake-lodge [painted lodge] here, and the snakes take everything. They leave no fat for the people."

"Well," said Blood-Clot, "I will go over to the snake-lodge to eat."

"No, you must not do that," said the old women. "It is dangerous. They will surely kill you."

"Well," said he, "I must have some fat with my meat, even if they do kill me."

Then he entered the snake-lodge. He had his white rock knife ready. Now the snake, who was the head man in this lodge, had one horn on his head. He was lying with his head in the lap of a beautiful woman. He was asleep. By the fire was a bowl of berry-soup ready for the snake when he should wake. Blood-Clot seized the bowl and drank the soup.

Then the women warned him in whispers, "You must go away: you must not stay here." But he said, "I want to smoke." So he took out his knife and cut off the head of the snake, saying as he did so, "Wake up! light a pipe! I want to smoke."

Then with his knife he began to kill all the snakes. At last there was one snake who was about to become a mother, and she pleaded so pitifully for her life that she was allowed to go. From her descended all the snakes that are in the world.

Now the lodge of the snakes was filled up with dried meat of every kind, fat, etc. Blood-Clot turned all this over to the people, the lodge and everything it contained. Then he said, "I must go away and visit other people."

So he started out. Some old women advised him to keep on the south side of the road, because it was dangerous the other way. But Blood-Clot paid no attention to their warning. As he was going along, a great windstorm struck him and at last carried him into the mouth of a great fish.

This was a sucker-fish and the wind was its sucking. When he got into the stomach of the fish, he saw a great many people. Many of them were dead, but some were still alive. He said to the people, "Ah, there must be a heart somewhere here. We will have a dance."

So he painted his face white, his eyes and mouth with black circles, and tied a white rock knife on his head, so that the point stuck up. Some rattles made of hoofs were also brought. Then the people started in to dance. For a while Blood-Clot sat making wing-motions with his hands, and singing songs. Then he stood up and danced, jumping up and down until the knife on his head struck the heart. Then he cut the heart down. Next he cut through between the ribs of the fish, and let all the people out.

Again Blood-Clot said he must go on his travels. Before starting, the people warned him, saying that after a while he would see a woman who was always challenging people to wrestle with her, but that he must not speak to her. He gave no heed to what they said, and, after he had gone a little way, he saw a woman who called him to come over. "No," said Blood-Clot. "I am in a hurry."

However, at the fourth time the woman asked him to come over, he said, "Yes, but you must wait a little while, for I am tired. I wish to rest. When I have rested, I will come over and wrestle with you."

Now, while he was resting, he saw many large knives sticking up from the ground almost hidden by straw. Then he knew that the woman killed the people she wrestled with by throwing them down on the knives. When he was rested, he went over.

The woman asked him to stand up in the place where he had seen the knives; but he said, "No, I am not quite ready. Let us play a little, before we begin." So he began to play with the woman, but quickly caught hold of her, threw her upon the knives, and cut her in two.

Blood-Clot took up his travels again, and after a while came to a camp where there were some old women. The old women told him that a little farther on he would come to a woman with a swing, but on no account must he ride with her.

After a time he came to a place where he saw a swing on the bank of a swift stream. There was a woman swinging on it. He watched her a while, and saw that she killed people by swinging them out and dropping them into the water. When he found this out, he came up to the woman. "You have a swing here; let me see you swing," he said.

"No," said the woman, "I want to see you swing."

"Well," said Blood-Clot, "but you must swing first"

"Well,"' said the woman, "Now I shall swing. Watch me. Then I shall see you do it." So the woman swung out over the stream. As she did this, he saw how it worked. Then he said to the woman, "You swing again while I am getting ready"; but as the woman swung out this time, he cut the vine and let her drop into the water.

This happened on Cut Bank Creek.

"Now," said Blood-Clot, "I have rid the world of all the monsters, I will go back to my old father and mother." So he climbed a high ridge, and returned to the lodge of the old couple.

One day he said to them, "I shall go back to the place from whence I came. If you find that I have been killed, you must not be sorry, for then I shall go up into the sky and become the Smoking-Star."

Then he went on and on, until he was killed by some Crow Indians on the war-path. His body was never found; but the moment he was killed, the Smoking-Star appeared in the sky, where we see it now.

http://www.firstpeople.us/FP-Html-Legends/...-Blackfoot.html

Edited by Sunny98

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http://www.firstpeople.us/FP-Html-Legends/....html#Blackfoot

How A Piegan Warrior Found The First Horses

A Blackfoot Legend

A long time ago a warrior of the Piegan Blackfoot dreamed about a lake far away where some large animals lived. A voice in the dream told him the animals were harmless, and that he could use them for dragging travois and carrying packs in the same way the Indians then used dogs. "Go to this lake," the dream voice told him, "and take a rope with you so that you can catch these animals."

When the Piegan awoke he took a long rope made from strips of a bull buffalo's hide and travelled many miles on foot to the shore of the lake. He dug a hole in the sandy beach and concealed himself there. While he watched, he saw many animals come down to the lake to drink. Deer, coyotes, elk and buffalo all came to quench their thirsts.

After a while the wind began to blow. Waves rose upon the lake and began to roll and hiss along the beach. At last a herd of large animals, unlike any the Piegan had ever seen before, suddenly appeared before him. They were as large as elks, and had small ears and long tails hanging to the ground. Some were white, and some black, and some red and spotted. The young ones were smaller. When they reached the water's edge and bent their heads to drink, the voice the man had heard in his dream whispered to him: "Throw your rope and catch one."

And so the Piegan threw his rope and caught one of the largest of the animals. It struggled and pulled and dragged the man about, and he was not strong enough to hold the animal. Finally it pulled the rope out of his hands, and the whole herd ran into the lake and sank out of sight beneath the water.

Feeling very sad, the Piegan returned to camp. He went into his lodge and prayed for help to the voice he had heard in his dream. The voice answered him: "Four times you may try to catch these animals. If in four times trying you do not catch them, you will never see them again."

Before he went to sleep that night the Piegan asked Old Man to help him, and while he slept Old Man told him that he was not strong enough to catch one of the big animals. "Try to catch one of the young animals," Old Man said, "and then you can hold it."

Next morning the Piegan went again to the shores of the big lake, and again he dug a hole in the sand and lay hidden there while the deer, the coyotes, the elk and the buffalo came to drink. At last the wind began to rise and the waves rolled and hissed upon the beach. Then came the herd of strange animals to drink at the lake, and again the man threw his rope. This time he caught one of the young animals and was able to hold it.

One by one he caught all the young animals out of the herd and led them back to the Piegan camp. After they had been there a little while, the mares--the mothers of these colts--came trotting into the camp. Their udders were filled with milk for the colts to drink. Soon after the mares came, the stallions of the herd followed them into the camp.

At first the Piegans were afraid of these new animals and would not go near them, but the warrior who had caught them told everybody that they would not harm them. After a while the animals became so tame that they followed the people whenever they moved their camp from place to place. Then the Piegans began to put packs on them, and they called this animal po-no-kah- mita, or elk dog, because they were big and shaped like an elk and could carry a pack like a dog.

That is how the Piegan Blackfoot got their horses.

Bad Weapons

A Blackfoot Legend

Once Old Man was fording a river, when the current carried him down stream, and he lost his weapons. He was very hungry, so he took the first wood he could find, and made a bow and arrows, and a handle for his knife and spear. When he had finished them, he started up a mountain. Pretty soon he saw a bear digging roots, and he thought he would have some fun, so he hid behind a log and called out, "No-tail animal, what are you doing?" The bear looked up, but, seeing no one, kept on digging.

Then Old Man called out again, "Hi, you dirt-eater!" and then he dodged back out of sight. Then the bear sat up again, and this time he saw Old Man and ran after him.

Old Man began shooting arrows at him, but the points only stuck in the skin, for the shafts were rotten and snapped off. Then he threw his spear, but that too was rotten, and broke. He tried to stab the bear, but his knife handle was also rotten and broke, so he turned and ran; and the bear pursued him. As he ran, he looked about for some weapon, but there was none, not even a rock. He called out to the animals to help him, but none came. His breath was almost gone, and the bear was very close to him, when he saw a bull's horn lying on the ground. He picked it up, placed it on his head, and, turning around, bellowed so loudly that the bear was scared and ran away.

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A Blackfoot Legend

During the flood, Old Man was sitting on the highest mountain with all the beasts. The flood was caused by the above people, because the baby (a fungus) of the woman who married a star was heedlessly torn in pieces by an Indian child.

Old Man sent the Otter down to get some earth. For a long time he waited, then the Otter came up dead. Old Man examined its feet, but found nothing on them. Next he sent Beaver down, but after a long time he also came up drowned. Again nothing was found on his feet. He sent Muskrat to dive next. Muskrat also was drowned.

At length he sent the Duck. It was drowned, but in its paw held some earth. Old Man saw it, put it in his hand, feigned putting it on the water three times, and at last dropped it. Then the above-people sent rain, and everything grew on the earth.

http://www.firstpeople.us/FP-Html-Legends/...-Blackfoot.html

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War Eagle

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If i may i'd just like to add this one off small collection of these 'Indian Motorcycles' to try and capture the historical & ''spiritual'' essence of these motorcycle engineering masterpieces...thanks :innocent::D

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War Eagle

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Treatment of American Indians

by the U.S. Government

“People don’t want to see the paintings; perhaps it reminds them of our holocaust or the genocide.”

—L. Frank,

Tongva/Ajachmen artist

Throughout United States history, the U.S. government has seen the goals and values of the Anglo-American and Indian communities as incompatible. Condemning the Indians for impeding the advancement of the United States and its citizens, the government assured its people that Anglo-American values would live and that the Indian communities would die. In order to achieve this goal, the government implemented practices that caused Indians to suffer such atrocities as genocide, imprisonment, rape, the sterilization of Indian women, and enslavement.

www.blackwell-synergy.com/links/

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Edited by REBEL

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For some reason, I found this photo compelling..

What's in her face that gives the impression of THE RESILIENT!?

Her lines show her years under the sun-- her long face shows her sorrows-- her eyes are deepened with memories- I'm sure like many of us her eyes remember the joy of her children, and the pain of losing those she loved. What all has she seen? All her wisdom that only comes with living.

What stories could this woman tell if she were able to tell any at all? Only she holds the secret to that--

(I didn't decrease the size of pic, the image's impact would decrease with it)

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http://www.firstpeople.us/photos/A_Blackfoot_woman.html

Edited by Sunny98

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Sitting Bull: Sioux

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William_MaudeFightingBear

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BLACK ELK:

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More: John wooden leg library here: great pics.

http://btc.montana.edu/tech/Northern_Cheye...onite/index.htm

Edited by Sunny98

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Chief RED CLOUD: Sioux

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Red Cloud was born around 1822, and died on December 10, 1909. He was the celebrated Chief of the Oglala Sioux Indian Tribe. One of the fiercest enemies the U.S. Army ever fought, he led the successful Indian Campaign known as Red Cloud's War between 1866 and 1868. He fought the army for control of parts of Montana and Wyoming.

He was born close to the present city of North Platte, Nebraska. He was the son of an Oglala mother and Brule Father. Red Cloud's Uncle, Chief Smoke, helped raise him. As a young man, he warred against both the Pawnee and Sioux, and became a skilled warrior.

He started Red Cloud's war in 1866, which was the most successful war an Indian nation ever waged against the US Army. The military was building forts along the Bozeman Trail straight through the Lakota Territory of Wyoming and Montana. As miners and pioneers started encroaching on Lakota Land, Red Cloud feared the demise of the Indian way of life there.

Red Cloud's military success forced the United States to make treaties. The US abandoned its forts on the Bozeman Trail, and gave the Lakota possession of much of South Dakota. In particular, the Lakotas were given the Black Hills of Montana and Wyoming.

Peace was short-lived. In 1874, General Custer attacked Red Cloud. Red Cloud did not take part in the Lakota war of 1876–77 with Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, and other war leaders.

Red Cloud continued to fight for the freedom of his people. At Pine Ridge, he fought corrupt Indian agents who stole from the natives.

http://www.sonofthesouth.net/union-general...f-red-cloud.htm

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A really beautiful post Brave, one that im sure will be appreciated by many.

Your words are a true testament to what a spiritual being you are, i appreciate your words when you are saying you would prefer to live in those times, i share the same view. Our world is becoming so advanced in technology that we are over looking the beauty that surrounds us, and instead of embracing it we destroy it.

I have said before and i will say again look back in order to create a better future.

I couldn't agree more with you-- ^ Brave!!

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Wolf MacCanine
I know what kind of life i would prefer..a peaceful one in harmony with the earth, i think the problem is people have become so accustomed to the war and death they dont see an end to it, they have no realisation that things could be different if more tolerance was applied, but its not as simple as that because people dont want to know or learn, unfortunately this world is full of power hungry, selfish people and even when you only have a few of them they still contaminate the minds of others.

Very well said. :tu:

We should be PROUD of whoever, whatever we are--

The only thing that we should be shameful of- is NOT learning from those mistakes that were made by our very forefathers.

Also very well said. :tu:

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These guys had such awesome yet humble spiritual wisdom and knowledge on how to live life.

============================================================

Native American Information On Cultural Integrity

What are the basic commonalities shared by the many different Shamanic practices throughout the world? What do they each have in common? Are there commonalities? Read and decide for yourself if this is the path for you. I have listed sources at the end of this article. Also, many thanks to Elder Medicine Fire, a real Shaman, my brother and a dear friend always.

1. "Going Around In Circles." All Shaman whether male, female, or androgynous understand this concept. Time is never linear but exists simultaneously on many different planes at one time. The Shaman understands the concept of many different cycles depending on where they are located. In the far reaches of the North two seasons exist which are Winter and Summer. At the Equator they are the season of wet and dry. Somewhere in between are areas that enjoy the four seasons of Winter, Spring, Summer and Fall. In some parts of the world the Agricultural Seasons rule when to plant and harvest. These seasons continue the same for years, centuries, and eons. There is an understanding of the movement of the Earth and the Moon in relationship to the Sun and the other planets and stars. These are all cycles going around in a circle. Shaman understand the concept of The Circle of Life. We are born, we live, and someday each of us will die. It is as natural as the Seasons turning and understanding each is in the domain of the Shaman to give advise, help, heal and teach as needed for the common good of the community. This often means placing the community first and yours on hold.

2. "Survival." This is extremely important. Not all Shaman will marry and reproduce offspring. If they do, it is important that they train their children how to take care of the 7th generation yet to be born. Even if they never marry or have children it is important that they teach so that the wisdom is not lost but continues to survive in the next generation and their children's children and so forth. One thing for sure, many students will show up wanting to learn if you are a Shaman. They will seek you and it's up to you to choose the right one to teach. The student only hopes and wants to prove themselves worthy. Many a student does not have what it takes. Being insecure, childish, not honest, unethical, immoral, participating in illegal activities or being irresponsible will not endear you to a great teacher let alone a mediocre teacher. Shaman have much responsibility for the common good and survival of the community taking their work very seriously. It is not unusual that they found their way quite by accident not wanting to accept the job as Shaman but got it anyway. It is a gift. The same goes for teaching. Often they did not want to teach but the class keeps getting larger anyway! This means they can be choosy teachers and the good Shaman usually takes on only one, two or three serious students at a time maybe in their entire lifetime.

3. "Responsibility." Not all understand the responsibility of recognizing that everything on this Blue Marbled Planet is connected and alive. This beautiful oxygenated living planet will always survive but will we? We are visitors here and the Earth is our Mother. We need to be more responsible for what is going on here. Our responsibility means making a difference so that the 7th generation yet to come will inherit a better place. It starts now and it starts today. Be responsible and waste nothing. Recycle, reuse, and make everything count. Make do with what you have. Don't be a part of the, "I see, I want group." Don't buy into who ever has the most toys wins. 4. "Gifting." Know that you are blessed if you truly have a job that you like and get paid for doing it. Meanwhile, if you don't have a job you like, work productively so you can get the job eventually that will pay you for what you like doing best. Be responsible for yourself and be self-sufficient. If you made too much share it with another while allowing them the dignity to repay you. This is known as a "gift for a gift." Teaching others is difficult, so remember not to waste time, your resources, or your efforts on those who refuse to learn from their mistakes. Teach the art of gifting to your community and your students. There are ignorant people who do not know any better. "I have enough to share and know that you too will share with me someday when I need it." This is a concept modern people don't always understand. It was an old custom of a "gift for a gift." It is what kept the economy going and is still practiced today but we call it spending money for an exchange of goods instead of "exchange of gifts."

5. "Education." Never stop learning and develop what you were born with: instincts, talents, skills, aptitudes, and your unique abilities. All of this was inherited from your ancestors. Teach and share your knowledge with others. Support and be able to educate your family. A Shaman never ever stops learning. Gather all the knowledge, store it, and use it for the good of the community.

6. "Honor Your Ancestors." You are here because of your ancestors. You would not exist had not they existed first. We also honor the youngest to oldest living member in our own family with equal respect as well. All have a purpose and each should have a say. To honor your ancestors is to honor yourself through them. They are here when we need help and oversee what we accomplish and do for the good of the community. Listen and the ancestors will speak.

7. "Respect." Have respect for all your brothers and sisters. We are all related and members of the same species known as "all-kind." Everything is living, alive, connected and related. The earth is our mother, the sky is related, and the moon is a relation as so is the sun. Every tree holds the memories of our past and oxygen to breath. Every crystal has stories that teach us. The fish, the mammals, the amphibians, the birds, all have something we can learn from in order to live better lives and teach others.

8. "Boundaries." Get rid of negativity in your life and set up boundaries for yourself. Be positive, seek the positive things in life that make you smile and be happy. Unhappy negative people do not live as long. Falsehoods, bad or unpleasant information is negative and the body needs goodness, wholesomeness, love, and positive experiences to survive and live a long healthy life. Strive to live a healthy life! Make good life choices and a good life partner. Always seek the light and enlightenment. Respect yourself, as you are an important individual deserving the very best life has to offer to be happy.

9. "Spirit." From Spirit you came and to Spirit you shall return. Life is eternal and is referred to as THE CIRCLE OF LIFE. We are born, we live and we die. Every Shaman must learn to face his/her own death. They must understand the cycle of life by coming to terms and facing death so they can guide others to the other side when it is their time to pass over. They must learn the art of compassion and allowing dignity of the dying. The young Shaman must learn by experiencing the joys and sorrows of life. The realm of death is to the more experienced Shaman. Shamans must let their spirit grow as well through experiencing all. None of this is learned over night or in just one lesson but through many lessons throughout one's entire lifetime. The Shaman must remember everything learned through experience and tap into those memories when needed.

10. "Connected." The Shaman must be connected to all there is and trust themselves while being there to experience all the senses which are to hear, to see, to smell, to feel and to taste. Above all they must also trust the ultimate intuition of the knowing and the communication with the other side. They must also master the sending and receiving which involves all of the above.

11. "Memory." Young Shaman are often like sponges and can retain great amounts of memory. The older Shaman learned at an early age to retain the memory and use it as needed along with being connected, which is using all of the senses and intuition. Suddenly there are no books, no records, or computers. What is the Shaman to do? The Shaman is the keeper of all the traditions, the history, the knowledge of our ancestors, and literally a walking library of knowledge for learning, healing, and helping. Be kind to your Elders. They have spent a lifetime of remembering and cataloging what is important, not what is trivial. Our continued survival depends on remembering.

WHAT IS YOUR PURPOSE?

............ 1. Go to your sacred place where you feel connection to deity.

......... .........

......... 2. Ask your Higher Power what your purpose, your duty, your job, your goal in life should be.

......... .........

......... 3. Often this is part of a Vision Quest. There are many kinds of Vision Quests. Some are a rite of passage taken for a few days, a week, or even a month. Men and women both may do this and it is always done alone with a teacher checking up on the individual participating to make sure they are all right. Usually, a Vision Quest is taken for a reason to accomplish something or learn something. Some Shaman use Sweat lodges, listen to drumming, bells jingling, rattling, singing, chanting, meditation, etc. to get into an altered state to communicate with Spirit. Some go to high places, a special well, a special rock formation or a place of high energy or a personal known sacred place.

......... .........

......... 4. The ancestors or deity will fill your mind with information you need to know.

......... .........

......... 5. Stand tall with your arms raised to the sky and ask out loud what you need to know. Be still, listen to the wind, honor all the elements, all living things, your ancestors, your deity, and then your purpose, your goal, and your duty will begin to grow from that point on.

H.J. Carol Thompson, AKA Stormy (Stormsdottir)

www.angelfire.com

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Edited by REBEL

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Navaho folk legend. "legend of the night chant" told by Neil Robbins.

Chief Tsosie: Navojo

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This is a story of Native American folklore. It is a tale told by the Navaho people. The name of it is "Legend of the Night Chant".

A very long time ago, there were three Navaho brothers. The oldest one was very rich. The second was a gambler and quite irresponsible. The youngest brother was a growing boy. They had a sister who was married. She and her husband lived a short distance from her three brothers.

Sometimes the second brother took things that belonged to his brothers. He would go to distant places to gamble. When he returned, he would tell about the marvelous things that the Holy People had shown to him. But his brothers did not believe those stories. They gave him a nickname; it was Bith Ahatini, which means "The Dreamer".

His brothers decided to go hunting one day. They did not want the Dreamer to go along on the trip. Therefore they did not tell him about the hunt. Instead, they invited their brother-in-law to go with them.

At about the end of their fourth day away from home, The Dreamer realized that they had gone on a hunt and had intentionally left him out of it. He took off to look for the hunters. The Dreamer wanted to catch up with them and help them carry the game which they had gotten. He also hoped to be rewarded by being given a pelt.

The Dreamer walked a lot way. Sunset came and he had not yet seen his brothers and brother-in-law. He was close to a canyon that was deep and rock-walled. Many voices were speaking from inside the canyon. The Dreamer stepped to the edge and looked over into the interior. Many crows were flying from one side of the canyon to the other.

Soon it became completely dark. The Dreamer listened and heard a voice. It loudly called, "They say! They say!"

An answer came from the opposite side. That voice said, "Yes! Yes! What is the problem?"

"Two people were killed today."

"Who were they? Who were they?"

The first voice said, "Ana-hail-ihi was slain at dawn. Igak-izhi was killed at dusk. The People of the Earth killed them. They were looking for meat and hunters killed them with arrows. It is sad, but they were warned to be cautious. They did not heed the warning. We cannot help them now; we must continue with the chant."

The Dreamer felt very scared in the darkness. However, he stayed to listen and watch what was going on. Songs were coming from openings in each canyon wall. The Dreamer now realized that the gods were singing. A fire glowed from inside the holes. Dancers were performing together; they kept time with rattles.

All through the night the firelight flickered from one wall to another. The singing and dancing continued.

Sunrise came and the dancers disappeared. The Dreamer resumed his search for the hunters. He walked for a short distance and found his brothers and brother-in-law. They were resting and had heavy loads of game. The older brother said, "Look, there is The Dreamer. I'll bet that he has some amazing story to tell us."

The Dreamer's brother-in-law greeted him first. He said, "You must have spent the night nearby; you are too far away from home to have come this far since dawn."

The Dreamer said, "I slept near a holy canyon. Many people were dancing there. The gods sang and - "

His older brother interrupted him by saying, "See there! I told you that he would have a lie to tell."

The older brother picked up his pack and walked off.

But the brother-in-law said, "Tell me the rest of your story. I want to hear it."

The younger brother did not stay to listen. He also thought that his brother was lying. The brother-in-law was very interested. The Dreamer told about everything that he had seen and heard during the night. He ended the story and said, "You or my brothers must have killed those people that they were talking about."

The brother-in-law said, "No! It could not have been any of us. We did not kill any people. Yesterday morning one of us shot a crow. We also slew a magpie last night. But there was no harm in it."

"I am afraid there was," said The Dreamer. "They are actually hunters like you. They were searching for meat to bring to the Holy People. Those hunters were disguised as birds."

The Dreamer and his brother-in-law began walking at a fast pace. They soon caught up with The Dreamer's brothers. The younger brother said to his brother-in-law, "Did he tell you a good story?"

The brother-in-law said, "It was not a lie. We killed a crow and a magpie yesterday. The Holy People were talking about it in the canyon last night. Look! I see four mountain sheep!"

The brother-in-law turned to The Dreamer and said, "Let's hurry and head them off."

The four reached the canyon where the strange voices had spoken. Four sheep were making their way out of the canyon. They were moving along large boulders. The three hunters moved back. The Dreamer went ahead. He hid close to the top of the trail.

As the sheep came near him, he held his bow and aimed for the heart of the sheep in the lead. But his fingers stuck to the bow and would not let go of it. The sheep passed by in safety. The Dreamer looked over the rim of the canyon. He ran in an effort to get ahead of them again. But as the sheep passed him a second time, his fingers would not release their grip on the bow.

The Dreamer tried a third time and a fourth, but still failed to kill the sheep. He spoke in anger about himself and the sheep. Then he suddenly stopped speaking.

The Dreamer now saw four gods. They had been transformed into sheep. Now they had turned back into their original forms, which were like those of men.

The one in the lead ran up to The Dreamer. He held up his balil, a rectangular, four-piece, folding wand. Then he dropped the balil over The Dreamer, who was sitting there. The god in the lead uttered a strange cry. The three other gods immediately appeared behind him. They were all wearing masks.

"From where did you come?" The Dreamer asked.

The Leader said, "From Kinni-nikai."

"Where are you going?"

"I am going to Taegyil. I will have another chant four days from now. Would you like to come along?"

"No, I would not be able to travel that far in four days."

But the gods easily persuaded The Dreamer to go. The Leader transformed his clothers in the same type of attire that the gods wore. They all took four steps to the east and changed into sheep. The group ran away along the rim of the canyon.

The hunters became restless because The Dreamer had not come back. They went out to see the trail on which they had last seen him. There was no one in sight. One of them went to the rock where The Dreamer had first hidden close to the sheep. He followed the footprints from one hiding place to another. He reached the fourth and last one. It was there that he saw his brothers bow and arrow. He followed the human tracks to the east. Soon he saw that they merged into a trail of five mountain sheep. The oldest brother began crying. He had always treated The Dreamer with contempt. Now he knew that he had been wrong about his brother.

The gods and The Dreamer went a long way on their four days' journey. They finally came to a large hogan on the fourth day. A hogan is an earth-covered lodge of the Dine (Navaho) people. There were many Holy People inside the hogan. They included both gods and humans.

The Dreamer entered the hogan with the four gods who were his companions. Someone complained about an earthly odor. The leader of the gods who had brought The Dreamer, took him outside. He made The Dreamer clean himself with yucca root suds.

Four large jewel posts stood inside the hogan. The gods hung their masks on them. The eastern post was made of white shell. The southern one was composed of turquoise. Abalone was the material of the western one. The northern post was made of jet.

There were two jewel pipes next to a god who sat on the western side of the hogan. He took tobacco and filled the pipes. Then he passed one to the right and the other to the left.

Everyone in the hogan smoked; the last ones were two large owls. They sat on each side of the entrance to the east. The smokers inhaled deeply and blew out vigorous puffs. As the smoking continued, people entered from every direction.

Lightning flashed at midnight. Heavy thunder and rain followed it. The Water Sprinkler sent the storm. He was angry because no one had told him about the dance ahead of time. But the Holy People invited him to take a smoke. That appeased the Water Sprinkler. The chant soon began. It lasted until morning.

Some of the gods had white deerskins with beautiful paintings. They resembled the artwork that the Navaho people now make with colored sands. The gods unfolded the paintings on the floor of the hogan during the chant.

People came from all directions on the last day of the dance. The Dreamer carefully observed all the prayers, songs, paintings, and dance movements. He closely studied each item used in the dance, memorizing its color, form, and size. By the time the chant was over, he knew all the details of the ceremony. It was Kieje Hatal, the "Night Chant".

The gods allowed The Dreamer to return to his own people for a while. It was long enought for him to perform the chant with his younger brother. He conducted the chant for people suffering from illness or ones afflicted by wickedness. The chant lasted nine days.

The Dreamer then returned to the gods at Taegyil, where he lives today. His younger brother taught the ceremony to the other Navaho people. They also call it Yebrichai Hatal, which means "The Chant of Paternal gods".

*retold* by Neil Robbins

http://www.soocool.com/gallery/photo.php?p...&u=623%7C12

Edited by Sunny98

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The Adena culture was a cluster of native american villages that existed around 500-100 BC in Central and south parts of Ohio..

The cow kachina: WAKAS

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Wakas is the Cow Kachina. This kachina spirt is a messenger to the rain gods. He is associated with the increase in animals, including cattle. One of the purposes connected with his dances has to do with an increase in animals. The kachina dancer who represents him performs in the kiva night dances and in the dances done during the day on the plaza.

Snow Kachina:

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The Snow Maiden Kachina, Nuvatchin Mana, represents snow and cold moisture. During the dance the snow maidens sing in high-pitched voices. This compliments their male partners, who sing in low deep voices. During parts of the dance, the snow maidens kneel and play their gourd instruments.

source:

http://www.infohub.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4768

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Warriors of the Rainbow

Native American Lore

There was an old lady, from the Cree tribe, named Eyes of Fire, who prophesied that one day, because of the white mans' or Yo-ne-gis' greed, there would come a time, when the fish would die in the streams, the birds would fall from the air, the waters would be blackened, and the trees would no longer be, mankind as we would know it, would all but cease to exist.

There would come a time when the "keepers of the legend, stories, culture rituals, and myths, and all the Ancient Tribal Customs" would be needed to restore us to health. They would be mankinds' key to survival, they were the "Warriors of the Rainbow".

There would come a day of awakening when all the peoples of all the tribes would form a New World of Justice, Peace, Freedom and recognition of the Great Spirit. The "Warriors of the Rainbow" would spread these messages and teach all peoples of the Earth or "Elohi". They would teach them how to live the "Way of the Great Spirit".

They would tell them of how the world today has turned away from the Great Spirit and that is why our Earth is "Sick". The "Warriors of the Rainbow" would show the peoples that this "Ancient Being" (the Great Spirit), is full of love and understanding, and teach them how to make the Earth or "Elohi" beautiful again.

These Warriors would give the people principles or rules to follow to make their path right with the world. These principles would be those of the Ancient Tribes. The Warriors of the Rainbow would teach the people of the ancient practices of Unity, Love and Understanding. They would teach of Harmony among people in all four corners of the Earth.

Like the Ancient Tribes, they would teach the people how to pray to the Great Spirit with love that flows like the beautiful mountain stream, and flows along the path to the ocean of life. Once again, they would be able to feel joy in solitude and in councils. They would be free of petty jealousies and love all mankind as their brothers, regardless of color, race or religion. They would feel happiness enter their hearts, and become as one with the entire human race. Their hearts would be pure and radiate warmth, understanding and respect for all mankind, Nature, and the Great Spirit.

They would once again fill their minds, hearts, souls, and deeds with the purest of thoughts. They would seek the beauty of the Master of Life -- the Great Spirit! They would find strength and beauty in prayer and the solitudes of life. Their children would once again be able to run free and enjoy the treasures of Nature and Mother Earth.

Free from the fears of toxins and destruction, wrought by the Yo-ne-gi and his practices of greed. The rivers would again run clear, the forests be abundant and beautiful, the animals and birds would be replenished. The powers of the plants and animals would again be respected and conservation of all that is beautiful would become a way of life.

The poor, sick and needy would be cared for by their brothers and sisters of the Earth. These practices would again become a part of their daily lives. The leaders of the people would be chosen in the old way -- not by their political party, or who could speak the loudest, boast the most, or by name calling or mud slinging, but by those whose actions spoke the loudest. Those who demonstrated their love, wisdom, and courage and those who showed that they could and did work for the good of all, would be chosen as the leaders or Chiefs.

They would be chosen by their "quality" and not the amount of money they had obtained. Like the thoughtful and devoted "Ancient Chiefs", they would understand the people with love, and see that their young were educated with the love and wisdom of their surroundings.

They would show them that miracles can be accomplished to heal this world of its ills, and restore it to health and beauty. The tasks of these "Warriors of the Rainbow" are many and great.

There will be terrifying mountains of ignorance to conquer and they shall find prejudice and hatred. They must be dedicated, unwavering in their strength, and strong of heart. They will find willing hearts and minds that will follow them on this road of returning "Mother Earth" to beauty and plenty -- once more.

The day will come, it is not far away. The day that we shall see how we owe our very existence to the people of all tribes that have maintained their culture and heritage. Those that have kept the rituals, stories, legends, and myths alive. It will be with this knowledge, the knowledge that they have preserved, that we shall once again return to "harmony" with Nature, Mother Earth, and mankind.

It will be with this knowledge that we shall find our "Key to our Survival".

Source

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The Lone Wolf Band of Cherokee Indians

Indiana's Cherokee people.

THE MEDICINE WHEEL

The Medicine Wheel represents the spirituality of the Cherokee as well as all other Native People.

Native People believe the wheel to be sacred because the Creator or Great Spirit created the Sun, the Moon, the Sky and Mother Earth round. Seasons come and go as in a circle. The Sun and the Moon revolve around Mother Earth in a circle, creating each day The circle represents all things in creation. Therefor we must see the circle as being sacred. The Cherokee as all other Native People dance in a circle to honor the circle of life and mother earth. Our drums are all made in circles. Our fires are made by placing logs in an “X” pattern which causes the fire to burn in a circular pattern.

The Medicine Wheel symbolizes the journey that each of us individually must take in our own life to find our correct and true path. The Medicine Wheel continues evolving and continues to bring new life lessons and the truth of the path you follow. The Medicine Wheel is round which represents the circle of life, from birth, to life as a child, life as a young person, life as an adult, life as an elder and finally death. You must honor and embrace each direction and that part of life and gain as much as you can and give as much as you can for a happy and fruitful journey.

The Medicine Wheel also teaches us about the path you take and the things you do in life can make the circle. If you do good for another, the circle will return good to you. But the same holds true for the bad things you do.

Within the Medicine Wheel is four primary sacred colors which represents our four sacred directions.

In the center of the Medicine Wheel is the sacred fire, which is the center of all things.

THE COLORS OF THE CHEROKEE

RED

Red was the symbolic color for success. Feathers, warrior clothing decorations, weapons and shields that were used against the enemy were colored red. Red beads were used to conjure the Red Spirit to insure a long life, recovery from illness, success in love and ball playing, or any other undertaking that would be benefitted by a magic spell. Red also represents the east. East is the beginning of all things. East is where we begin the spiritual aspect of our circular path and the growth of our personal spirit. East is where the sun rises. Red is associated with fire. The Red Spirits lived in the east.

BLACK

Black was the symbolic color for death. It is believed that the soul of the enemy was continually beaten about by black war clubs and the enemy was surrounded by black fog. In conjuring to destroy and enemy, the priest used black beads and invoked the black spirits from the west to tear out the enemies soul and carry it to the west and place it in a black coffin, buried in black mud with a black serpent coiled above it. The Black Spirits lived in the west.

BLUE

Blue was the color that symbolized failure, disappointment or unsatisfied desires. If it was said that a person “would never become blue” would mean that the person would be very successful and never fail at anything they did. The Blue Spirits lived in the North.

WHITE

White was the color that symbolized purity, innocense, peace and happiness. To be happy would be to say “I am white.” The sacred path of the Cherokee is the “White Path or White Road.” White beads were used to conjure happiness. A white pipe was used to ratify

http://www.skyenet.net/~myersdk/toc.html

Edited by Sunny98

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The Lone Wolf Band of Cherokee Indians

Indiana's Cherokee people.

MOONS OF THE CHEROKEE

January

Month of the Cold Moon - Unolvtani

This time of the season is for personal and ritual observance, fasting and personal purification. During this season, families prepare for the coming of the new seasons, which start in March or the Windy Moon - Anuyi Personal items and tools for planting and repaired, and new ones made. Stories and classes on about the ancestors and the family, and traditions and customs are told to the younger ones by the elders. A winter or “Cold Moon Dance” is usually held in the community, marking the end of one cycle season and welcoming the beginning of the new cycle. The Sacred and the hearth fires are extinguished new ones started by the “Priest” of certain Clans. This concedes with the first new-arrival of the morning star (The Sun’s daughter - Venus) in the east.

February

Month of the Bony Moon - Kagali

Is a traditional time of personal family feast, observing and honoring those family and friends who have passed to the other side.

A family meal is prepared, including seats for the departed ones. This is also a time for fasting and ritual observance. A community dance officiated by Didahnvwisgi, “Curer of Them” or “Doctor”, or more commonly know as “Medicine Man”. The Medicine Man performs a dance called the “Medicine Dance”.

March

Month of the Windy Moon - Anvyi

is the “First New Moon” of the seasons. Traditionally the beginning of the new planting season cycle or “Moons”. New town council fires are started. The figure that represents the First New Moon is Kanati, one of several being created by the “Apportioner” Unethlana to help him. These helpers were charged with the control of life elements of Mother Earth: air/earth/fire/water. Their domains are the sky, earth, stars and the seven levels of the universe.

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April

Month of the Flower Moon - Kawoni

The first plants of the season, including the new medicine and herb plants that taught mankind how to defend against sickness and conjure begin to sprout at this time. New births for both humans and animals are customary at this time. Rivers and streams controlled by the spirit being, “Long Man” renew their lives. Ritual observances are made to “Long Man” and a customary dance called the “Knee Deep Dance” or the “Water Frog Dance of Spring”.

May

Month of the Planting Moon - Anisgiti

During this month families traditionally prepare the fields and sow them with the stored seeds from the last season. Corn, beans, squash, tomatoes, potatoes, yams and sunflowers are some food planted at this time. A traditional dance called the “Corn Dance” is preformed at this time.

June

Month of the Green Corn - Dehaluyi

This is the time for the signs of the first “corn in tassel”, and the emerging of the various plants of the fields. People traditionally began preparations for the upcoming festivals of the ensuing growing season. People of the Ani Gadugi Society, a volunteer group, traditionally began repairs on town houses, family homes and generally provide any services needed by the less fortunate, disabled, Elders and for the infirm of the villages.

July

Month of the Ripe Corn Moon - Guyequoni

This is the time when the first foods of the new planting are ready. Towns begin the cycle festivals with dances and celebrations of thanks to Mother Earth and the “Apportioner” Unethlana, are given. Traditional this is time of the “Green Corn Dance” or festival. A common reference of this moon is the “First Roasting of Ears”... sweet corn moon. The Month of the Ripe Corn Moon is the customary time for the commencement of the stick ball games traditionally called AniStuti, or “Little War”. Stick ball dances and festivals are commonly held at this time.

August

Month of the end of the Fruit Moon - Galoni

Foods of the trees and bushes are gathered at this time. The “Paint Clans” commonly begin to gather the herbs and medicines for which they were historically known. And the “Wild Potato Clans began harvesting various foods growing along the streams, marshes, lakes and ponds. Traditional Green Corn festivals are held at this time.

September

Month of the Nut Moon - Dulisdi

The corn harvest referred to as the “Ripe Corn Festival” was traditionally held in the first part of this month to acknowledge Selu the Spirit of the Corn. Selu is thought of as “First Woman”. The festival respects Mother Earth for providing all the foods during the growing season. The “Brush Feast Festival” customarily takes place during this season. All the fruits and nuts of the bushes and trees of the forest are gathered at this time. A wide variety of nuts went into the nut breads for the various festivals throughout the seasons. Hunting by the hunters of the village traditionally began at this time.

October

Month of the Harvest Moon - Duninvdi

This is the time of the traditional “Harvest Festival” Nowatequa, when the people give thanks to all the living things of the fields, Mother Earth and “Apportioner” Unethlana that has helped them live. The “Great Moon” festival was traditional at this time. Many “Tsalagi New Year” celebrations are held within the nations at this time.

November

Month of the Trading Moon - Nvdadewi

Traditionally this is the time for trading and barter for manufactured goods, produce and hunting supplies among the different towns and tribes. The People traded with nearby tribes as well as distant tribes, including those of Canada, Middle America and South America. Also the customary “Friendship Festival”, Adohuna (new friends made), was held at this time. This was also the time when all transgressions were forgiven. The festival also recalls a time before “world selfishness and greed”. This was a time when the needy among the towns were gifted whatever they needed to help them through the coming winter.

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December

Month of the Snow Moon - Vsgiyi

The spirit being, “Snow Man”, brings the snow and cold to cover Mother Earth while she rests and waits for the rebirth of the seasons. Families traditionally were busy putting up and storing goods for the next cycle of seasons. Elders enjoyed teaching and retelling ancient stories to the young.

http://www.skyenet.net/~myersdk/moons.html

Edited by Sunny98

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