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War Eagle

Native American Culture.

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War Eagle

THIS IS A STORY OF A LITTLE NATIVE AMERICAN SCHOOL GIRL ABUSED BY A 'CATHOLIC MISSION' IN THE 1950's FOR SPEAKING HER OWN LANGUAGE - Rebel

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My best friend, Rose, was the most fun in the world. I looked forward each day to meeting her in the school hallway just before the bell rang. She often wore a barely-suppressed grin, or covered her mouth with her hand. I would spend recess trying to get her tell me what the joke was. Usually, she had managed undetected to plant a stone on Sister's chair or sneak an extra crust of bread from the supper hall. Rose, head bobbing, dark eyes twinkling, would finally share her secret transgression with me, causing us both to burst into uncontrollable giggles, and occasionally drawing the attention of a stony-faced nun who, disturbed by our laughter, would shoo us to move on.

The Catholic Mission loomed at the far end of the only road cutting through Fort Providence, Northwest Territories. In l954, I entered my first year of school there as the only "white kid". My father spent his days predicting weather and tapping it in Morse Code, down to a military base in Hay River. My mother cooked, knitted, sewed my clothes and preserved berries. I, being a spirited 5 year old, knew that we lived in an exciting place, accessible only by barge or float plane and snowed under nine months of the year.

The Mission school was the place for me to go to and hang out with other children.I didn't question the locked iron doors, the bars on the windows, the unreasonable rules imposed by the nuns. I didn't find it unusual that my playmates were several hundred native children who lived at the school rather than with their families. It was my only experience of school and I had no need to question.

The day I arrived at school and didn't see Rose, I thought she must be ill. The recess bell finally rang and, in the impish manner I had learned from my friend, I quietly slid down the forbidding corridors that led to the dormitory. The nun who was changing the beds glared at me as though I wasn't meant to exist. I lowered my eyes to my shoes, knowing the necessary rules to avoid having to stand in the corner or get the strap.

"What are you doing here?" she barked.

I heard the squeak of her black boots, the jangle of her crucifix and the angry swish of her robes as she came closer.

"Looking for Rose, Sister. I thought she was sick." "She's not here. Now get back to class!"

I scurried back to the coatroom and pulled on my parka and touque.

She must be outside, I thought, struggling to push open the heavy back door.

Children filled the snowy yard, screaming, laughing, building snow forts and pulling each other around on little pieces of cardboard. It was freezing today and the nuns gathered close to the building, warming their hands over the fire barrel. I stood on the high stone steps, searching everywhere for Rose's red jacket. Finally I spotted her in the farthest corner, standing with her face to the fence, no friends around.

"Rose!"

I shouted as loudly as I could, running down the steps and slogging through the deepest part of the snow where the other children had not gone. When I reached her, I tugged on her sleeve.

"Come on, Rose! Recess is almost over!"

She kept her back to me, warming her hands under her jacket. Impatiently, I tugged again, sure that the bell would ring at any moment and we would have no time to play.

Now she turned, her face drawn with pain and fury. She held up her red, swollen hands and I knew then that she hadn't been warming them, but holding, protecting them as best she could, from the searing pain. I saw the tears, which had frozen on her beautiful cheeks.

"When I go home I'm going to talk Indian!", she whispered fiercely.

The bell rang and neither one of us moved. Cold needled into our faces and I stood,watching Rose breathe rapid frosty puffs into the bleak northern air. I didn't know what to do for my friend. When I looked back, I saw the other children were almost all inside.

"Rose, we have to go."

She nodded, wiping her face in her sleeve. We couldn't hold hands like we usually did. Instead, I touched her shoulder as we walked toward the stone steps, where two nuns stood like sentries, waiting for us.

Rose and I never talked about what had happened to her. We still sat together everyday and traded the ribbons in our hair. We built forts and pulled each other around in the snow on pieces of cardboard. Rose talked longingly of eating her granny's toasted bannock and romping in the woods with her younger sisters, who hadn't yet arrived at the Mission school.

Our family left Fort Providence two years later. In the time I knew her, Rose never did get to go home.

[Note from Sonja Keohane: After reading this, I asked Carol for an explanation of what had been done to Rose's hands. This was her response:

Rose was strapped for speaking her language. This is a common practice in schools all over the place at the time. Her open hands were hit with a large thick leather strap, many times. I received the strap on several occasions, although not as harshly as Rose did in my story. I did see many native children whose hands were strapped so long and hard that they were blistered for days, as though they had been burned with fire.]

By Carol M. Hodgson

http://www.twofrog.com/hodgson.html

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Edited by REBEL

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War Eagle

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"WHO ARE THE ELDERS?"

by Daniel Crowfeather

It seems that there are many people these days who are trying to find a spirituality that they can believe in. For whatever reason, we are beginning to pay more attention to our spirit and to our direction in life. Many of us have found ourselves drawn to the First Nations beliefs, perhaps because they are seen as clean and pure, and based on the simpler times that we all seem to miss.

As we make our way along the Red Road, with luck we are led to a person who has been given the wisdom and knowledge to be a teacher. We call these people Elders, and from them we begin to learn the ways and traditions that form the heart of First Nations beliefs. While these Elders generally do not think of themselves as anything special, they are usually highly regarded and treated with great respect.

For some of us, however, these early times can be dangerous. Being human, most of us have a desire to be respected by the people around us. When we see the respect being given to our Elders, we may begin to hope that, someday, we may earn that respect for ourselves. We try to learn as much as we can as quickly as we can, hoping to impress people with our wisdom. We forget that knowledge of facts is not the same as wisdom, which only comes from a lifetime of reflecting on these facts.

The danger is greatest at the time when we realize that there are people who share our road that know even less than we do. These people may be easily impressed by the tiny amount of knowledge that we carry. Such people might even mistake that knowledge for wisdom, and we may find ourselves receiving some of that respect that we crave. We may find that we enjoy the taste of that respect, and our egos may even lead us to think of ourselves as Elders... and the trap is sprung!

It is important to understand what an Elder is. Aboriginal traditions hold the elderly in high regard, because a long life full of experience leads to wisdom. But an Elder in the spiritual sense is not just old; today an elderly person may have no knowledge whatsoever of spirituality. While such a person may have valuable wisdom in other areas of life, they obviously cannot be a spiritual Elder. A real Elder carries facts about their traditions AND the wisdom that comes from long study and practice of those traditions. However, when you are just starting out on the path, it can be hard to tell the difference. Those who are impressionable can be fooled by an older person with a small amount of knowledge, claiming to be an Elder.

Another very popular claim is to be a Healer. True Healers are those who are given the ability to Heal others using only their own energies and resources. Such people are extremely rare: perhaps a handful walk the earth today. My wife and I do not know of any, and probably neither do you. If you know someone who is claiming that they are a Healer, rest assured that they are either lying or deluded... true Healers never advertise, because they know that the people who need them will be brought to them, quietly and without fuss. They do not seek recognition, because they are only too aware of the heavy burden of responsibility they carry, and they do not wish to add to it.

Finally, there are all the self-proclaimed Visionaries. At best, these people learn from real Seers, then pass on the visions as their own. At worst, they will invent any vision that will impress their audience. Once again, if the person brags of it, then it is not so. True Seers do not advertise, because they do not need to. Again, those who need their help will be brought to them, and they know it. They never seek the spotlight.

The lure of prestige and notoriety can be hard to resist. I am saddened that there are people within our own circle of friends who have started to call themselves Elders, and pretend to carry far more knowledge than they actually have. There is one who has appointed himself a spiritual leader, and has created a following of people who have virtually no knowledge of tradition. He tells them that they are Elders as well. There is another who claims to be a Healer, and performs smudging and purification ceremonies for others. Because she has not learned the proper use and purposes of sacred medicines, she has no understanding of the danger this poses for both herself and for the people she tries to help. There are still others who ask questions of Elders, then pass on the answers to other people claiming to have received them direct from the spirits. We call this 'riding someone else's tobacco,' and it is a simple attempt to gain notoriety at the expense of others. In each case, these people have brought a great deal of trouble into their own lives by doing these things. However, despite these warnings, their egos lead them to continue to misguide others, and they cause much suffering as a result.

Each of us has a best possible path to walk, and each of us is here for some specific purpose. For most of us, our walk is all about learning. While we may not see this as significant, the Creator does not make mistakes: each life interacts with many others, so each one is as important as any other. Ignoring our path and trying to do something more spectacular simply wastes a lifetime, and possibly endangers ourselves and others. While a person's life is their own, to waste if they so choose, causing someone else to waste or misuse their life is perhaps the vilest and most disgusting thing that one human can do to another.

It is time for all the pedestals to be torn down, and for each of us to walk the paths we were intended to walk. We must push aside our egos, and listen to the spirits and to the quiet voice of our own hearts. To do any less is to break faith with ourselves, and with the spirits who agreed to help and guide us. Let the true Elders to do the teaching. Let the Healers do the Healing. Let the Seers do the Seeing. Be content that your life, lived as it supposed to be lived, is as important and necessary as that of any other person. Learn, love, and be humble.

All my relations...

Daniel Crowfeather. http://www.firstpeople.us/articles/articles.html

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War Eagle

NATIVE AMERICAN SPIRITUALITY.

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BLACK ELK SPEAKS

VISIONS OF THE OTHER WORLD

So I dressed myself in a sacred manner, and before the dance began next morning I went among the people who were standing around the withered tree. Good Thunder, who was a relative of my father and later married my mother, put his arms around me and took me to the sacred tree that had not bloomed, and there he offered up a prayer for me. He said: "Father, Great Spirit, behold this boy! Your ways he shall see!" Then he began to cry.

I thought of my father and my brother and sister who had left us, and I could not keep the tears from running out of my eyes. I raised my face up to keep them back, but they came out just the same. I cried with my whole heart, and while I cried I thought of my people in despair. I thought of my vision, and how it was promised me that my people should have a place in this earth where they could be happy every day. I thought of them on the wrong road now, but maybe they could be brought back into the hoop again and to the good road.

Under the tree that never bloomed I stood and cried because it had withered away. With tears on my face I asked the Great Spirit to give it life and leaves and singing birds, as in my vision.

Then there came a strong shivering all over my body, and I knew that the power was in me.

Good Thunder now took one of my arms, Kicking Bear the other, and we began to dance. The song we sang was like this:

"Who do you think he is that comes?

It is one who seeks his mother!"

It was what the dead would sing when entering the other world and looking for their relatives who had gone there before them.

As I danced, with Good Thunder and Kicking Bear holding my arms between them, I had the queer feeling that I knew and I seemed to be lifted clear off the ground. I did not have a vision all that first day. That night I thought about the other world and that the Wanekia himself was with my people there and maybe the holy tree of my vision was really blooming yonder right then, and that it was there my vision had already come true. From the center of the earth I had been shown all good and beautiful things in a great circle of peace, and maybe this land of my vision was where all my people were going, and there they would live and prosper where no Wasichus were or could ever be.

Before we started dancing next day, Kicking Bear offered a prayer, saying: "Father, Great Spirit, behold these people! They shall go forth to-day to see their relatives, and yonder they shall be happy, day after day, and their happiness will not end."

Then we began dancing, and most of the people wailed and cried as they danced, holding hands in a circle; but some of them laughed with happiness. Now and then some one would fall down like dead, and others would go staggering around and panting before they would fall. While they were lying there like dead they were having visions, and we kept on dancing and singing, and many were crying for the old way of living and that the old religion might be with them again.

After awhile I began to feel very queer. First, my legs seemed to be full of ants. I was dancing with my eyes closed, as the others did. Suddenly it seemed that I was swinging off the ground and not touching it any longer. The queer feeling came up from my legs and was in my heart now. It seemed I would glide forward like a swing, and then glide back again in longer and longer swoops. There was no fear with this, just a growing happiness.

I must have fallen down, but I felt as though I had fallen off a swing when it was going forward, and I was floating head first through the air. My arms were stretched out, and all I saw at first was a single eagle feather right in front of me. Then the feather was a spotted eagle dancing on ahead of me with his wings fluttering, and he was making the shrill whistle that is his. My body did not move at all, but I looked ahead and floated fast toward where I looked.

There was a ridge right in front of me, and I thought I was going to run into it, but I went right over it. On the other side of the ridge I could see a beautiful land where many, many people were camping in a great circle. I could see that they were happy and had plenty. Everywhere there were drying racks full of meat. The air was clear and beautiful with a living light that was everywhere. All around the circle, feeding on the green, green grass, were fat and happy horses; and animals of all kinds were scattered all over the green hills, and singing hunters were returning with their meat.

I floated over the tepees and began to come down feet first at the center of the hoop where I could see a beautiful tree all green and full of flowers. When I touched the ground, two men were coming toward me, and they wore holy shirts made and painted in a certain way. They came to me and said: "It is not yet time to see your father, who is happy. You have work to do. We will give you something that you shall carry back to your people, and with it they shall come to see their loved ones."

I knew it was the way their holy shirts were made that they wanted me to take back. They told me to return at once, and then I was out in the air again, floating fast as before. When I came right over the dancing place, the people were still dancing, but it seemed they were not making any sound. I had hoped to see the withered tree in bloom, but it was dead.

Then I fell back into my body, and as I did this I heard voices all around and above me, and I was sitting on the ground. Many were crowding around, asking me what vision I had seen. I told them just what I had seen, and what I brought back was the memory of the holy shirts the two men wore.

That evening some of us got together at Big Road's tepee and decided to use the ghost shirts I had seen. So the next day I made ghost shirts all day long and painted them in the sacred manner of my vision. As I made these shirts, I thought how in my vision everything was like old times and the tree was flowering, but when I came back the tree was dead. And I thought that if this world would do as the vision teaches, the tree could bloom here too.

I made the first shirt for Afraid-of-Hawk and the second for the son of Big Road.

In the evening I made a sacred stick like that I had seen in my first vision and painted it red with the sacred paint of the Wanekia. On the top of it I tied one eagle feather, and this I carried in the dance after that, wearing the holy shirt as I had seen it.

Because of my vision and the power they knew I had, I was asked to lead the dance next morning. We all stood in a straight line, facing the west, and I prayed: "Father, Great Spirit, behold me! The nation that I have is in despair. The new earth you promised you have shown me. Let my nation also behold it."

After the prayer we stood with our right hands raised to the west, and we all began to weep, and right there, as they wept, some of them fainted before the dance began.

As we were dancing I had the same queer feeling I had before, as though my feet were off the earth and swinging. Kicking Bear and Good Thunder were holding my arms. Afterwhile it seemed they let go of me, and once more I floated head first, face down, with arms extended, and the spotted eagle was dancing there ahead of me again, and I could hear his shrill whistle and his scream.

I saw the ridge again, and as I neared it there was a deep, rumbling sound, and out of it there leaped a flame. But I glided right over it. There were six villages ahead of me in the beautiful land that was all clear and green in living light. Over these in turn I glided, coming down on the south side of the sixth village. And as I touched the ground, twelve men were coming towards me, and they said: "Our Father, the two-legged chief, you shall see!"

Then they led me to the center of the circle where once more I saw the holy tree all full of leaves and blooming.

But that was not all I saw. Against the tree there was a man standing with arms held wide in front of him. I looked hard at him, and I could not tell what people he came from. He was not a Wasichu and he was not an Indian. His hair was long and hanging loose, and on the left side of his head he wore an eagle feather. His body was strong and good to see, and it was painted red. I tried to recognize him, but I could not make him out. He was a very fine-looking man. While I was staring hard at him, his body began to change and became very beautiful with all colors of light, and around him there was light. He spoke like singing: "My life is such that all earthly beings and growing things belong to me. Your father, the Great Spirit, has said this. You too must say this."

Then he went out like a light in a wind.

The twelve men who were there spoke: "Behold them! Your nation's life shall be such!"

I saw again how beautiful the day was - the sky all blue and full of yellow light above the greening earth. And I saw that all the people were beautiful and young. There were no old ones there, nor children either - just people of about one age, and beautiful.

Then there were twelve women who stood in front of me and spoke: "Behold them! Their way of life you shall take back to earth." When they had spoken, I heard singing in the west, and I learned the song I heard.

Then one of the twelve men took two sticks, one painted white and one red, and, thrusting them in the ground, he said: "Take these! You shall depend upon them. Make haste!"

I started to walk, and it seemed as though a strong wind went under me and picked me up. I was in the air, with outstretched arms, and floating fast. There was a fearful dark river that I had to go over, and I was afraid. It rushed and roared and was full of angry foam. Then I looked down and saw many men and women who were trying to cross the dark and fearful river, but they could not. Weeping, they looked up to me and cried: "Help us!" But I could not stop gliding, for it was as though a great wind were under me.

Then I saw my earthly people again at the dancing place, and fell back into my body lying there. And I was sitting up, and people were crowding around me to ask what vision I had seen.

I told my vision through songs, and the older men explained them to the others. I sang a song, the words of which were those the Wanekia spoke under the flowering tree, and the air of it was that which I heard in the West after the twelve women had spoken. I sang it four times, and the fourth time all the people began to weep together because the Wasichus had taken the beautiful world away from us.

I thought and thought about this vision. The six villages seemed to represent the Six Grandfathers that I had seen long ago in the Flaming Rainbow Tepee, and I had gone to the sixth village, which was for the Sixth Grandfather, the Spirit of the Earth, because I was to stand for him in the world. I wondered if the Wanekia might be the red man of my great vision, who turned into a bison, and then into the four-rayed herb, the daybreak-star herb of understanding. I thought the twelve men and twelve women were for the moons of the year.

http://www.firstpeople.us/articles/Black-E...eaks-Index.html

http://www.firstpeople.us/

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MissMelsWell

I apologize if this story has already been posted.

Iktomi and the Coyote has always been one of my favotite Trickster/Morality type of stories from the Native Americans. I was lucky enough some 18 years ago to have seen this old legend performed by a group of opera singers at the Nellie Cornish School of the Arts in Seattle Washington. I recommend visiting the Web site I have linked to which provides some extensive annotations for the story:

Iktomi and the Coyote

Retold by Zitkala-Sa

AFAR off upon a large level land, a summer sun was shining bright. Here and there over the rolling green were tall bunches of coarse gray weeds.Iktomi in his fringed buckskins walked alone across the prairie with a black bare head glossy in the sunlight. He walked through the grass without following any well-worn footpath.

From one large bunch of coarse weeds to another he wound his way about the great plain. He lifted his foot lightly and placed it gently forward like a wildcat prowling noiselessly through the thick grass. He stopped a few steps away from a very large bunch of wild sage. From shoulder to shoulder he tilted his head. Still farther he bent from side to side, first low over one hip and then over the other. Far forward he stooped, stretching his long thin neck like a duck, to see what lay under a fur coat beyond the bunch of coarse grass.

A sleek gray-faced prairie wolf! his pointed black nose tucked in between his four feet drawn snugly together; his handsome bushy tail wound over his nose and feet; a coyote fast asleep in the shadow of a bunch of grass! -- this is what Iktomi spied. Carefully he raised one foot and cautiously reached out with his toes. Gently, gently he lifted the foot behind and placed it before the other. Thus he came nearer and nearer to the round fur ball lying motionless under the sage grass.

Now Iktomi stood beside it, looking at the closed eyelids that did not quiver the least bit. Pressing his lips into straight lines and nodding his head slowly, he bent over the wolf. He held his ear close to the coyote's nose, but not a breath of air stirred from it.

"Dead!" said he at last. "Dead, but not long since he ran over these plains! See! there in his paw is caught a fresh feather. He is nice fat meat!" Taking hold of the paw with the bird feather fast on it, he exclaimed, "Why, he is still warm! I'll carry him to my dwelling and have a roast for my evening meal. Ah-ha!" he laughed, as he seized the coyote by its two fore paws and its two hind feet and swung him over head across his shoulders. The wolf was large and the teepee was far across the prairie. Iktomi trudged along with his burden, smacking his hungry lips together. He blinked his eyes hard to keep out the salty perspiration streaming down his face.

All the while the coyote on his back lay gazing into the sky with wide open eyes. His long white teeth fairly gleamed as he smiled and smiled.

"To ride on one's own feet is tiresome, but to be carried like a warrior from a brave fight is great fun!" said the coyote in his heart. He had never been borne on any one's back before and the new experience delighted him. He lay there lazily on Iktomi's shoulders, now and then blinking blue winks. Did you never see a birdie blink a blue wink? This is how it first became a saying among the plains people. When a bird stands aloof watching your strange ways, a thin bluish white tissue slips quickly over his eyes and as quickly off again; so quick that you think it was only a mysterious blue wink. Sometimes when children grow drowsy they blink blue winks, while others who are too proud to look with friendly eyes upon people blink in this cold bird-manner.

The coyote was affected by both sleepiness and pride. His winks were almost as blue as the sky. In the midst of his new pleasure the swaying motion ceased. Iktomi had reached his dwelling place. The coyote felt drowsy no longer, for in the next instant he was slipping out of Iktomi's hands. He was falling, falling through space, and then he struck the ground with such a bump he did not wish to breathe for a while. He wondered what Iktomi would do, thus he lay still where he fell. Humming a dance-song, one from his bundle of mystery songs, Iktomi hopped and darted about at an imaginary dance and feast. He gathered dry willow sticks and broke them in two against his knee. He built a large fire out of doors. The flames leaped up high in red and yellow streaks. Now Iktomi returned to the coyote who had been looking on through his eyelashes.

Taking him again by his paws and hind feet, he swung him to and fro. Then as the wolf swung toward the red flames, Iktomi let him go. Once again the coyote fell through space. Hot air smote his nostrils. He saw red dancing fire, and now he struck a bed of cracking embers. With a quick turn he leaped out of the flames. From his heels were scattered a shower of red coals upon Iktomi's bare arms and shoulders. Dumfounded, Iktomi thought he saw a spirit walk out of his fire. His jaws fell apart. He thrust a palm to his face, hard over his mouth! He could scarce keep from shrieking.

Rolling over and over on the grass and rubbing the sides of his head against the ground, the coyote soon put out the fire on his fur. Iktomi's eyes were almost ready to jump out of his head as he stood cooling a burn on his brown arm with his breath.

Sitting on his haunches, on the opposite side of the fire from where Iktomi stood, the coyote began to laugh at him.

"Another day, my friend, do not take too much for granted. Make sure the enemy is stone dead before you make a fire!" Then off he ran so swiftly that his long bushy tail hung out in a straight line with his back.

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Lt_Ripley

2 of my favorites -

Two Wolves

One evening an old Cherokee told his grandson about a

battle that goes on inside people.

He said, "My son, the battle is between two

"wolves" inside us all.

One is Evil. It is anger, envy, jealousy, sorrow, regret,

greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false

pride, superiority, and ego.

The other is Good. It is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility,

kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion and faith."

The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather:

"Which wolf wins?"

The old Cherokee simply replied, "The one you feed."

and

"If you take [a copy of] the Christian Bible and put it out in the wind and the rain, soon the paper on which the words are printed will disintegrate and the words will be gone. Our bible IS the wind." Statement by an anonymous Native woman

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War Eagle

Thanks for those MissMelsWell & Lt Ripley. :tu:

When i first read 'Two Wolfs' few weeks back it blew me away.

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NATIVE AMERICAN HEALING

Native Americans Speak Out on Sacred Healing and Transformational Rituals

The Vision Quest

Those of us on a spiritual path believe that we are put on this earth for a special reason, but that reason is not always clear to us. We want to know what we need to accomplish in life for our highest benefit, and, in turn, the benefit of the world. The vision quest can reveal our life has purpose, but it is an arduous journey into the core of our being that we should only embark upon with sincerity. William Walk Sacred cautions, "Its very important for people to realize that this is not fun and games. Going into the spiritual world is very serious. If the intent isn't clear, the spirits will not give the vision. The most important thing is being clear in your heart as to what you are seeking for yourself and the people of the world."

How to embark on a vision quest varies greatly from tribe to tribe. Walk Sacred experience, as a Cree Indian, involved a long period of preparation, which he says is designed, in part, to weed out all but the most committed. Walk Sacred describes this procedure in great detail:

Sometimes going on a vision quest is not as elaborate or detailed in terms of preparation. Still the experience can be a powerful one when the intention for a vision is strong. Eagle Man, an Ogalala Sioux, shares what his immersion into nature taught him, although he says the experience is too powerful to fully express in words:

Eagle ManVision Quest

"One time, I had a medicine person put me up on the hill. Another time, I had two very powerful medicine people as my mentors. They simply said, Go up on this place, and vision quest. They never accompanied me, nor did they have a sweat lodge waiting for me. They just took me up on the hill and placed me. They told me to do it and I just did it.

"I went to the mountain, and I parked my car down below. I took my peace pipe, and I simply walked up to the top of the mountain. In those days, believe it or not, when you went to Bear View Mountain, there was nobody there. Now it's quite crowded because Native spirituality has become so popular. But when I used to go there, I would be the only one on the whole mountain. So, Id walk way up there and Id fast. Id drink no water. I'd simply take four little flags--red, white, black, and yellow--and place them around me, in a square. Id stay in the square. If I had to go to the bathroom, Id go away, of course, and then come back. But thats it. Id sit in my square, and watch the sun come up in the morning, and set at night. I'd see the moon come up, and I'd see all the phases of the earth. When you're fasting, your mind becomes more alert. You simply contemplate your life. And when you fall asleep, your dreams become more vivid.

"As each day goes by, the phases of life go through their cycles. At night, the stars come out. Pilades will actually dance for you if you're a vision quester. They light up, almost like a neon sign. I know people find that hard to believe, but thats just the mystery of the ceremony. An eagle will hover right over you knowing that you're in ceremony. Thunder and lightning come by, and you just endure it. It's no problem. Lightning can be flashing all around you, and you'll laugh. The Great Spirit is not going to take your life up there while you are vision questing. And if it does, who cares? You're in a good state. But you don't fear nature or God. The Great Spirit made you. Why should you fear it? You become more confident once you follow this natural road.

"So, this is a vision quest. Its performed by you and its for yourself. You don't have to go through anybody. You can communicate to the Great Spirit through observation. Of course, it's nice to have a medicine person there to help you interpret the experience. When I came down from the mountain, the medicine man asked me, What did you see? I said that I didn't see too much. This eagle just came and hovered over me, and lightning cracked close to me. Were you afraid? He asked? No, I wasn't afraid. In fact, I laughed. And I saw four horses before I went up the mountain. But they were real, live horses. What color were they? He wanted to know. He was even interested in these pre-vision quest scenes, as well as my dreams."

Eagle Man suggests that most people attempting a vision quest go into the mountains for one or two days at most, as the majority aren't stronger to go up for long periods of time.

(extract only)

by Gary Null

http://www.garynull.com/documents/nativeamerican.htm

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Edited by REBEL

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MissMelsWell

You're most welcome Rebel!

I have been hearing the story of Iktomi and the Coyote for years. My grandfather was half Choktaw Indian and I grew up hearing this Plains indian version. It's interesting though that most of native tribes have some version of the story too. The one I saw performed as an Opera (really an opera for children) was based on the Pacific NW version of the story, which involves a landslide (or mountain) falling on Iktomi and the Wolf rather than being burned by fire.

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Osirian

Wow - didn't realize there were so many of us in here. Good to see.

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War Eagle

Hi ya Osirian, so cool to see theres so many of you here,...as for me i have no NA heritage @ all, i'm what you guys refer to as a 'Wannabee' or if you like an enthusiast. :D

I'l be the first to admit that i'm an amateur on NA culture & spirituality but the more i see/read about it the more i like.

Later. :tu:

Yea MMW, if the story/stories is/was told in part of the Iktomi and the Coyote & so many other of their stories for that matter by most tribes, then i can only say there is or must be/have been genuine meaning and or truth or even a lot of elements of truth in them, be it on a spiritual and psychical level.

The way i see it these guys didn't just tell stories & pass it down from generation to generation over thousands of years just to entertain their people & or give their children bed time stories for entertainment or whatever, i think it all had meaning...

For eg as some of the info posted in this thread state they had stories & meanings woven in every part of their culture from the cloths they wore right through to their music & the even the food they ate...'it all meant something to them' or if you like 'everything they did was for a genuine purpose'...all this before the invasion of course then the world started loosing or if you like forget their esoteric wisdom and ways of life.

Later...

Rebel. :tu:

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SHARING THE WISDOM OF THE OLD WAYS - Lench Archuleta

Native American Spirituality & Medicine of the Modern World. linked-image

Since the beginning of time The Old Ones were given special knowledge.

It was simple and powerful. It allow us to understand our dance of life.

People have forgotten this way. It is a time to revisit this knowledge...this very very old wisdom.

''The myth that defines us as men or women begins at birth. We are given a role as hunter, provider, warrior, survivor, etc. We are then cast into a stance of defending this role throughout life.

To find balance in life we must learn a new way to see. This knowledge is not new, it is very, very old and so our dance begins. - Lench Archuleta

http://www.healing-arts.org/nativelinks.htm

http://windspiritteaching.com/

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Edited by REBEL

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Kalien

Some more from my folder. I have no stories though, thin you have most of them covered.

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Barek Halfhand

Wow Rebel

just the art alone is worth the four stars bro! :tu: ......B

Native Americans have very strong beliefs in the spriit world if I'm not mistaken....

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MissMelsWell

Hey Rebel,

Ya, it's interesting for sure. I grew up hearing stories from my grandfather occasionally, but he was NOT proud of his Choctaw heritage and refused to talk about his family or his youth in Oklahoma. I've done some searching over the years to see what I could find out, and have found a few other folks who share my last name, whose relatives were known to be Choctaw, and have a similar story (if identical) we've swapped some emails and we are assuming we are somehow related, but don't know for sure. What we've managed to figure out is that the family was perhaps quite large, but something happened that fractured the entire family, we're thinking it was something that was well... really bad, but have no idea what. (we're guessing that there were at minimum 8 children, and we believe that the mother was Choctaw and father was caucasian but have no concrete proof).

So, if anyone has any information about the Choctaw families in Oklahoma around 1930+/- I'd love to hear about them. My grandfather passed 2 years ago now.

Edited by MissMelsWell

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Kalien

I have some Blackfoot in me, and it shows in my facial features but not my coloring, some say I look kinda like an albino Native American, so I collect pictures to compare... that and they are just wonderful to look at.

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Barek Halfhand

From what I've read so far.... a "medicine man" is a medium........B

halfhandshuffle:aerosmith- back in the saddle

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DkYn8TdFS9o

Edited by Barek Halfhand

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War Eagle

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edit: lol...you got your post in before i got mine. Yea mediums or shamans, i think it's all basically the same.

Thanks Barek, and it's good to see ya. :tu:

Most of the pics/art and or spiritual side of NA art kind of grabs ya and takes hold. Sill a lot out there to see though, i'l find what i can and try and post it, even if you come across any yourself feel free.

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Sorry to hear your grand dad MMW, i'm sure he had his reasons, also how it turned out for your family line.

I would think there are so many other families out there that must have and or are going through the same thing.

I only hope it pans out for you in the end and that you do reunite with some if not all your bloodline family members. :)

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Blackfoot hey Kaylee,cool...they have a long and proud past.

Those pics are truly awesome, each pic tells you a story...great stuff.

Hope you don't mind i've stolen most of your pics for my own collection. :innocent::D

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Later.

Rebel.

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Edited by REBEL

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Barek Halfhand

You asked for it! :devil:

there is a golfcourse in Fort Atkinson WI. that is situated around some historic Indian burial grounds, while the actual mounds are set aside from the golf course (a beautiful one at that-lakeside) I at times feel as though this is in some way disrespectful....now keep in mind , part of the course(grounds) is the mounds historical marker, witch is very nicely perserved and memorialized with plaques and history clearly posted....

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Also in an Illinois town southwest of Chicago, there was a protest staged by a group of Native Americans to try to stop the conversion of a piece of land into a golf course....it was later resolved but not without considerable bitterness....B

http://www.geocities.com/soarring/Close2.html

A Fond Farewell—And The Next Step

Midwest SOARRING has reached its peak goal this year land for reburial. With the transfer of a deed for 5.9 acres in Peoria, Illinois, to the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, the 6-year search for land ended. The work of repatriation and burial site protection will not and cannot end here, however, the history of Midwest SOARRING can now be closed.

At the Annual Members' Meeting on October 21, 2000, the Board introduced a motion to dissolve the parent organization, Midwest SOARRING, and to transfer all goods, services, etc., to Midwest SOARRING Foundation. The plan was to focus the energies of the Board and membership on current and planned projects that will continue to support repatriation issues, protect and restore mother earth, and provide workshops, community-building events, etc. The motion passed by majority vote, and a new era began.

Midwest SOARRING will become an archives of past information and ongoing reference (via the website), so that access to information will continue for all interested parties. Several Midwest SOARRING Board members will move on to work directly with the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, according to requests for help. The new Board for Midwest SOARRING Foundation will continue fulfilling the goals of its mission statement when it was established in 1996 (see adjacent article, Midwest SOARRING Foundation—A Running Start).

It is the function of any non-profit organization to bring attention to a need, gain supporters and raise funds for the achievement of goals. Once the goals have been achieved, the natural outcome of a successful organization is the creation of community. This is our prize, equal to our greatest achievements—the friendships that developed among us as we struggled side by side from the time of the New Lenox site to the final victory in Peoria. These friendships extend beyond time, and in the Native understanding of life, join with those of the past, present and future.

In salute to the many hours, the blood, sweat and tears, the outpouring of energies from willing hands and overflowing hearts, and the unflagging faith that we would reach our goals if we stood strong together, we list the accomplishments of Midwest SOARRING from 1994-2000:

Challenged the legality of the Memorandum of Agreement for the New Lenox site

Edited by Barek Halfhand

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Gone away
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That story touched me deeply...Thanks Reb!

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Kalien

I don't mind you collecting them for your collection, I am taking yours too ;D

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Edited by Kaylee

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Radian
,...as for me i have no NA heritage @ all, i'm what you guys refer to as a 'Wannabee' or if you like an enthusiast. :D

I'l be the first to admit that i'm an amateur on NA culture & spirituality but the more i see/read about it the more i like.

You know what I see Rebel:: your heart, mind, and spirit are significant to what the native americans stood for--& represent! You express that same spirituality as they do, and you also encourage life to those things that these peoples find extremely vital, but is dying because no one gives a hoot or been forgotten.... You're not a "wannabe!" You already are accepted because you're caring is genuine and certainly is appreciated. Remember, It's more of spirituality than it is bloodline-

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MissMelsWell

Like I mentioned before, I have always got a kick out of the Native American Trickster stories (and in fact love the childrens stories). This one is about the creation of Mt. Si in Washington State. It's a unique mountain due to it's shape, but it's not overly large. Locals love to take the take the challenge of Rock Climbing it. I have inlcuded a picture. For those familiar with the TV show and movie Twin Peaks. Mt. Si was featured in that series. It's a beautiful area

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_____

A Snoqualmie Legend

Long ago, Snoqualm, or Moon, was chief of the heavens. One day he said to Spider, "Make a rope of cedar bark and stretch it from the earth to the sky."

Soon Fox and Blue Jay found the rope and climbed up it. Late at night they came to the place where it was fastened to the underside of the sky. Blue Jay picked up a hole in the sky, and the two of them crawled through.

Blue Jay flew to a tree, and Fox found himself in a lake. There he changed himself into Beaver. Moon had set a trap in the lake, and Beaver got caught in the trap. Next morning Moon took Beaver out of the trap, skinned him, stretched his skin out to dry, and threw the body into a corner of the smokehouse.

The next night Beaver waited until Moon was asleep and snoring loudly. Then he got up, took his skin from the place where it was stretching, and put it back on. While Moon was still snoring, he examined the house and the sky world.

Outside he found a great forest of fir and pine and cedar trees. He pulled some of them up by their roots and then, with his spirit powers, made them small enough to carry under one arm. Under his other arm he put Moon's tools for making daylight. He took some fire from below the smoke hole, put ashes and leaves and bark around it, and carried in one hand. He found the sun hidden in Moon's house and carried it away in his other hand.

Then Beaver found the hole Blue Jay made, changed himself back to Fox again, and went down the rope to the earth. There he gave the fire to the people. He set out the trees. He made the daylight. He set the sun in its place so it would give light and heat to all. The people were happy because of the things Fox brought from the sky.

By this time Moon had awakened. When he found the beaver skin gone and the sun stolen, he was very angry. He knew that one of the earth people had tricked him. Noticing footprints around the house, he followed them to the top of the rope Spider had made.

"I'll follow him to the earth world," Moon thought.

But as he started down, the rope broke. Both Moon and rope fell down in a heap and were transformed into a mountain.

Today the peak is called Mount Si. The face of Snoqualm, Moon, can still be seen on one of it's rocky walls. The trees which Fox brought down from the sky and planted have become the great forests of the Cascade Mountains.

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Bearly
Some Native American Indian Prophecies for the end times...their version.

Other and similar prophecies as told by some of the Elders follow a very similar and in a lot of ways carbon copy of what Lelanie Fuller Stone has written, including... Black Elk, Frank Waters, Lee Brown, Thomas Banacyca and others.

Prophecy

"Warriors of the Rainbow"

There was an old lady, from the "Cree" tribe, named "Eyes of Fire", who prophesied that one day, because of the white mans' or Yo-ne-gis' greed, there would come a time, when the fish would die in the streams, the birds would fall from the air, the waters would be blackened, and the trees would no longer be, mankind as we would know it would all but cease to exist.

There would come a time when the "keepers of the legend, stories, culture rituals, and myths, and all the Ancient Tribal Customs" would be needed to restore us to health. They would be mankinds’ key to survival, they were the "Warriors of the Rainbow". There would come a day of awakening when all the peoples of all the tribes would form a New World of Justice, Peace, Freedom and recognition of the Great Spirit.

The "Warriors of the Rainbow" would spread these messages and teach all peoples of the Earth or "Elohi". They would teach them how to live the "Way of the Great Spirit". They would tell them of how the world today has turned away from the Great Spirit and that is why our Earth is "Sick".

The "Warriors of the Rainbow" would show the peoples that this "Ancient Being" (the Great Spirit), is full of love and understanding, and teach them how to make the "Earth or Elohi" beautiful again. These Warriors would give the people principles or rules to follow to make their path right with the world. These principles would be those of the Ancient Tribes. The Warriors of the Rainbow would teach the people of the ancient practices of Unity, Love and Understanding. They would teach of Harmony among people in all four comers of the Earth.

Like the Ancient Tribes, they would teach the peoples how to pray to the Great Spirit with love that flows like the beautiful mountain stream, and flows along the path to the ocean of life. Once again, they would be able to feel joy in solitude and in councils. They would be free of petty jealousies and love all mankind as their brothers, regardless of color, race or religion. They would feel happiness enter their hearts, and become as one with the entire human race. Their hearts would be pure and radiate warmth, understanding and respect for all mankind, Nature, and the Great Spirit. They would once again fill their minds, hearts, souls, and deeds with the purest of thoughts. They would seek the beauty of the Master of Life - the Great Spirit! They would find strength and beauty in prayer and the solitudes of life.

Their children would once again be able to run free and enjoy the treasures of Nature and Mother Earth. Free from the fears of toxins and destruction, wrought by the Yo-ne-gi and his practices of greed. The rivers would again run clear, the forests be abundant and beautiful, the animals and birds would be replenished. The powers of the plants and animals would again be respected and conservation of all that is beautiful would become a way of life.

The poor, sick and needy would be cared for by their brothers and sisters of the Earth. These practices would again become a part of their daily lives.

The leaders of the people would be chosen in the old way - not by their political party, or who could speak the loudest, boast the most, or by name calling or mud slinging, but by those whose actions spoke the loudest. Those who demonstrated their love, wisdom, and courage and those who showed that they could and did work for the good of all, would be chosen as the leaders or Chiefs. They would be chosen by their "quality" and not the amount of money they had obtained. Like the thoughtful and devoted "Ancient Chiefs", they would understand the people with love, and see that their young were educated with the love and wisdom of their surroundings. They would show them that miracles can be accomplished to heal this world of its ills, and restore it to health and beauty.

The tasks of these "Warriors of the Rainbow" are many and great. There will be terrifying mountains of ignorance to conquer and they shall find prejudice and hatred. They must be dedicated, unwavering in their strength, and strong of heart. They will find willing hearts and minds that will follow them on this road of returning "Mother Earth" to beauty and plenty - once more.

The day will come, it is not far away. The day that we shall see how we owe our very existence to the people of all tribes that have maintained their culture and heritage. Those that have kept the rituals, stories, legends, and myths alive. It will be with this knowledge, the knowledge that they have preserved, that we shall once again return to "harmony" with Nature, Mother Earth, and mankind. It will be with this knowledge that we shall find our "Key to our Survival".

This is the story of the "Warriors of the Rainbow" and this is my reason for protecting the culture, heritage, and knowledge of my ancestors. I know that the day "Eyes of Fire" spoke of - will come! I want my children and grandchildren to be prepared to accept this task.The task of being one of the........"Warriors of the Rainbow''.

by Lelanie Stone

http://www.powersource.com/ebt/stone.html

This story is very moving to me, not only for the story, but because is reminds me of the first time that I heard it. I was working for Greenpeace one summer canvassing, and a Chief of the Cherokee and an advisor came and spoke to our canvassing group, and told us that story. They were extremely kind to me and offered to help me with a problem that I was having, but that is a personal story for some other time, all I can say is that I was and will always be very honored by their kindness. I will always remember and be grateful to them for their offer to help and for the beauty of the vision of that story and for their love of our earth and The Creator (Great Spirit). May the Creator bless them and may we also be inspired by this story and be kinder to our Earth Mother and see our oneness with all living things in the great Web of Life.

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War Eagle

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Hello Bearly.

Your own personal story is touching & moving in itself. Great stuff :tu: ...as Sunni stated couple of posts above. The NA's always lived/live by a common but ALL important code if i could call it that, and that was to live all aspect of life by mind body & spirit & respecting all creation.

I guess the proof is there to be seen with people such as yourself and countless others i'm sure that has crossed paths one time or another with these great people.

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Hey Sunny,...what can i possibly say to you after reading that?!...i'm touched...thanks u-ne-sv-yv-tli sa-wu (lol hope i got that right) :D

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lol! Kaylee...no problem, i've got stacks more if you like. :tu:

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That story kind of plucked @ my heartstrings too dp...sadder yet, imagine how many other stories like that which have happened in the past that we'l never read or hear about especially where the children & the elderly were concerned? :hmm:

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Yea Barek, where i'm from the federal government passed a ''Native Lands Title Act'' to stop any mining, excavation or construction anywhere near 'sacred ground/sites' for obvious reasons throughout the country. Although in some places it was the act was honored, but in a lot of places i don't think the government gave a crap allowing major mining co to have their way thru red tape tech b/s or whatever...a lot of anger & protests followed not just by indigenous but whites as well for yrs.

A lot of these sites were places of worship but most of all they were burial places of their ancestors, family friends or whatever. Picture bulldozers, excavators & other heavy machinery ripping up our cemeteries and churches without consent and or consideration??! linked-image

Later.

Just pics...

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Edited by REBEL

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Barek Halfhand

Here is some more on the Woodland Indian Tribe.... this site never does mention Wiscson though.....B

(from web)

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Longhouse

Who Are the Woodland Tribes?

Woodland Indian tribes lived east of the Plains Indians and extended from New England and Maryland to the Great Lakes Area and into Maine. They lived in the forests near lakes or streams, which is why they're called Eastern Woodland Indians. Their food, shelter, clothing, weapons and tools came from the forest. The Iroquois, Mound Builders, Algonquian and Shawnee are a few Woodland tribes.

Woodland Tribes - Shelter

Woodland tribes lived in wigwams and longhouses. Wigwams are round, wooden-framed structures, covered in bark. Only one familylived in a wigwam. Longhouses are made the same way as wigwams except they are rectangular, instead of round. They have a long hallway with rooms on both sides. Several related families shared a longhouse.

Woodland Tribes - Food

Living in the woods meant there were plenty of resources, including food. Woodland tribes were hunters and gatherers. They hunted bear, moose and bison, and were effective fishermen. They also ate beavers, raccoons, rabbits, corn, beans and berries. Woodland Indians grew squash, pumpkins and melons. Tribes in the Great Lakes Area ate a lot of rice.

Woodland Tribes - Ceremonies

When someone in a Woodland tribe died, the tribe would hold a cry ceremony. The chief sang and danced around the fire. This ceremony lasted for five days. The day before it started, five knots were tied in a piece of milkweed. Every day of the ceremony they untied a knot.

Face paint was a big deal to Woodland Indians. They wore it to express feelings each color meant something: red = life, black = death or eternal grief and purple = royalty) and for special occasions. Before

Woodland Indians

going to war, they painted themselves, performed magical rites and took special medicines. Several of the tribes performed many songs and rites. They used special equipment that they thought helped them talk to their gods. They also wore masks to cure diseases. The scary masks were supposed to scare the evil spirit out of the sick person.

Woodland Tribes - Clothing

Clothing was made from the pelts (animal skin with the hair or fur still on it) of animals they ate. The Iroquois, for example, wore shirts, leggings and moccasins made of buckskin (animal skin without the fur or hair) during the winter. The women wore skirts woven out of wild grass and covered with furs. They wore leggings underneath. During the hot weather, men only wore a loincloth (a small piece of buckskin between their legs and tucked into a belt) and woman wore their grass dresses. Children wore nothing.

Woodland Tribes - Did U Know?

Shawnee men often wore silver nose rings and earrings. The men would even cut slits into their ears and wrap the skin in coils of silver wire. The weight of the metal would stretch the skin into great loops, which were admired. Some of them hung down two or three inches.

Here's one hairstyle you won't see come back in style. Woodland Indians pulled or plucked out most of their hair except for a square or round patch that covered the crown or top part of the head

Edited by Barek Halfhand

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Barek Halfhand

Here is some more on the Woodland Indian Tribe.... this site never does mention Wisconson though.....B

(from web)

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http://www.kidzworld.com/img/upload/articl...i1_indian24.jpg

Longhouse

Who Are the Woodland Tribes?

Woodland Indian tribes lived east of the Plains Indians and extended from New England and Maryland to the Great Lakes Area and into Maine. They lived in the forests near lakes or streams, which is why they're called Eastern Woodland Indians. Their food, shelter, clothing, weapons and tools came from the forest. The Iroquois, Mound Builders, Algonquian and Shawnee are a few Woodland tribes.

Woodland Tribes - Shelter

Woodland tribes lived in wigwams and longhouses. Wigwams are round, wooden-framed structures, covered in bark. Only one familylived in a wigwam. Longhouses are made the same way as wigwams except they are rectangular, instead of round. They have a long hallway with rooms on both sides. Several related families shared a longhouse.

Woodland Tribes - Food

Living in the woods meant there were plenty of resources, including food. Woodland tribes were hunters and gatherers. They hunted bear, moose and bison, and were effective fishermen. They also ate beavers, raccoons, rabbits, corn, beans and berries. Woodland Indians grew squash, pumpkins and melons. Tribes in the Great Lakes Area ate a lot of rice.

Woodland Tribes - Ceremonies

When someone in a Woodland tribe died, the tribe would hold a cry ceremony. The chief sang and danced around the fire. This ceremony lasted for five days. The day before it started, five knots were tied in a piece of milkweed. Every day of the ceremony they untied a knot.

Face paint was a big deal to Woodland Indians. They wore it to express feelings each color meant something: red = life, black = death or eternal grief and purple = royalty) and for special occasions. Before

Woodland Indians

going to war, they painted themselves, performed magical rites and took special medicines. Several of the tribes performed many songs and rites. They used special equipment that they thought helped them talk to their gods. They also wore masks to cure diseases. The scary masks were supposed to scare the evil spirit out of the sick person.

Woodland Tribes - Clothing

Clothing was made from the pelts (animal skin with the hair or fur still on it) of animals they ate. The Iroquois, for example, wore shirts, leggings and moccasins made of buckskin (animal skin without the fur or hair) during the winter. The women wore skirts woven out of wild grass and covered with furs. They wore leggings underneath. During the hot weather, men only wore a loincloth (a small piece of buckskin between their legs and tucked into a belt) and woman wore their grass dresses. Children wore nothing.

Woodland Tribes - Did U Know?

Shawnee men often wore silver nose rings and earrings. The men would even cut slits into their ears and wrap the skin in coils of silver wire. The weight of the metal would stretch the skin into great loops, which were admired. Some of them hung down two or three inches.

Here's one hairstyle you won't see come back in style. Woodland Indians pulled or plucked out most of their hair except for a square or round patch that covered the crown or top part of the head

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War Eagle

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This is one of many reasons, but an all important one @ that, why i love & respect the Native American Indian culture, way of life and their beliefs. They make it quite clear that their belief system in spirituality HAS NO PRICE...'exploitation is non existent'.

That tells me right off, that it's straight down the line no B/S if'$ or but'$...JUST & ONLY 'genuine' in their beliefs and intentions.

Although they 'welcome' any outsiders of any faith & or belief system to study/follow & or even participate 'if they choose'...

WITHOUT PRICE, TAKE IT OR LEAVE IT, MAKE OF IT WHAT YOU WILL is basically their motto, there is no boundries or obligations to anyone by them in anyway...PERIOD.

Rebel.

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SELLING AMERICAN INDIAN SPIRITUALITY

"Cheating Us, Cheating Them"

By Pte Cante Winyan

extracts only...

We have come to a point in this society where everything has a price. Water is sold, dirt is sold, children are sold, and now in some areas even AIR is sold. So it's no wonder that many people, with otherwise innocent intentions, will pay for American Indian spiritual teachings. Why would it be wrong? Everything has a price, doesn't it? What most do not understand is this is the paradigm of the dominant culture. You don't own the land, you don't own spirituality, and therefore you can't sell something you don't own.

There is nothing wrong with seeking knowledge there is no harm in learning the ways of indigenous cultures. There is something VERY wrong in leaning from people who have taken a little of this and a little of that and then created their own teachings. They cheat not only those they steal from but also from those that pay for these teachings. There is no value and no healing in lying and making up ceremony and teachings that are created out of ego and greed.

For many decades, Indian Spirituality has been sincerely followed by many, not just those of Indian blood, and most respected the ways and have assisted in saving some of our culture and heritage. However, on the other side we have also been bombarded by those seeking a way to make a living from teaching what will sell. To subvert the very core of our connection to Creation of which those of truly traditional knowledge are trying to save from the spiritually blind and the greedy.

EXPLOITATION of the Native American Indians:

There are very few true Indian people that will deny anyone the knowledge they are meant to have. And there are ways to seek that knowledge if it is for you to know. If you truly want to learn, get involved with saving Mother Earth, find the real Indian people fighting to eliminate the degrading and disrespectful Indian mascots, lobby the educators to include truthful teaching of US history (i.e., Columbus was a slave trader, Custer was a coward and murdered innocent women, children and elderly, Thanksgiving was a celebration of an Indian massacre, etc.)

By Pte Cante Winyan

http://www.native-languages.org/religion.htm

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Edited by REBEL

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