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Australia beaches turn blood red

Posted on Tuesday, 27 November, 2012 | Comment icon 7 comments | News tip by: DKO


Image credit: CC 2.0 Ed Bierman

 
Several beaches in Sydney have been closed by officials as red algae turned the water a deep red.

The unusual phenomenon can happen when certain weather conditions result in a more widespread bloom of algae than is usually seen in the region. Due to concerns over the risk to swimmers, authorities took the decision to close the beaches and conduct tests on the water.

"There are some possible risks to human health from red algae including skin rashes and eye irritation, and for this reason the beach will remain closed until the algae dissipates," said a spokesman. "Signage has been installed at Clovelly Beach, and council lifeguards are advising people not to swim."

"Patches of the red algae, a natural phenomenon that can be exacerbated by certain weather conditions, were sighted between Bondi Beach and Maroubra Beach this morning."

  View: Full article

 Source: Perth Now


  Discuss: View comments (7)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Darkwind on 27 November, 2012, 11:57
We get that in Florida sometimes. Kills a lot of fish. I think pollution plays a role in it as well as weather.
Comment icon #2 Posted by LiveForTomorrow on 27 November, 2012, 12:09
Its beautiful, but if its being cause by human activity than thats another story.
Comment icon #3 Posted by with bells on on 27 November, 2012, 12:37
i was going to go swimming at Clovelly on thursday.. wont be doing that now.. eek!!
Comment icon #4 Posted by 27vet on 28 November, 2012, 7:37
Red tide is a common event and makes fish inedible and beaches are usually closed for swimming.
Comment icon #5 Posted by Junior Chubb on 28 November, 2012, 10:12
Biblical stuff!!!! Not really, just a natural phenomena...
Comment icon #6 Posted by Sundew on 28 November, 2012, 22:42
I once had a 15 gallon fresh water aquarium I was cycling turn blood red overnight, and just as suddenly the next day it was clear again. I believe the organisms responsible are dinoflagellates, but I did not expect to see them in fresh water or an aquarium. As they are know to give off toxins I did several water changes before adding any fish. These red tides can be deadly to sea life. Once while in Sarasota, Florida I saw first hand what one can do, thousands of dead fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other organisms dead and rotting all over the beach. The stench was terrible and the red tide... [More]
Comment icon #7 Posted by CuriousGreek on 30 November, 2012, 13:12
I once had a 15 gallon fresh water aquarium I was cycling turn blood red overnight, and just as suddenly the next day it was clear again. I believe the organisms responsible are dinoflagellates, but I did not expect to see them in fresh water or an aquarium. As they are know to give off toxins I did several water changes before adding any fish. These red tides can be deadly to sea life. Once while in Sarasota, Florida I saw first hand what one can do, thousands of dead fish, crustaceans, mollusks, and other organisms dead and rotting all over the beach. The stench was terrible and the red tide... [More]


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