Thursday, March 22, 2018
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help   RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in
This news story is archived which means that, while it is still available to view, the information contained within may be outdated and the original source site/link may no longer be viewable.

For the most recent stories, please visit either the site's home page or main news section.

Secrets of the immortal jellyfish

Posted on Saturday, 1 December, 2012 | Comment icon 17 comments

Image credit: Mila Zinkova

Could the secret to immortality be found within a particularly unusual species of jellyfish ?

German marine-biology student Christian Sommer had been researching small aquatic invertebrates off the cliffs of Portofino when he came upon an interesting and obscure species known as Turritopsis dohrnii. After spending time studying the specimens, Sommer started to realise that what he had found was something rather special. The strange creatures appeared to age in reverse, becoming younger and younger before repeating their life cycle over again.

Scientists would later describe this process as similar to a butterfly that turns back in to a caterpillar or even a chicken that turns back in to an egg before hatching again. In short, the species never dies - it just repeats its life cycle over and over. What Sommers had discovered was a form of life that could legitimately lay claim to the term 'immortal'.

"After several days he noticed that his Turritopsis dohrnii was behaving in a very peculiar manner, for which he could hypothesize no earthly explanation."

  View: Full article

 Source: New York Times

  Discuss: View comments (17)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #8 Posted by Imaginarynumber1 on 2 December, 2012, 7:48
If you open a New York Times this weekend, you'll find a story about jellyfish and immortality splashed across the cover of the Sunday magazine.The 6,500-word narrative is a compelling read, but a critic at the Knight Science Journalism program at MIT urges skepticism. "...the problem with this story is that much of what is reported is highly improbable, even unbelievable," writesPaul Raeburn. "And the writing is discursive to a fault." The author, novelist Nathaniel Rich, traveled to Japan to meet a scientist who thinks that an organism known asTurritopsis dohrnii may unlock the secret to hum... [More]
Comment icon #9 Posted by Simbi Laveau on 2 December, 2012, 8:09
[/size][/font][/color] Are you ever not a kill joy ?
Comment icon #10 Posted by Imaginarynumber1 on 2 December, 2012, 8:48
Are you ever not a kill joy ? No. I don't like living in the Land of Make Believe.
Comment icon #11 Posted by The New Richard Nixon on 2 December, 2012, 20:07
Jellyfish can never been fully understood, so in my view this is still open as space. We don't know everything, he jealous that someone else claimed it first
Comment icon #12 Posted by little_dreamer on 3 December, 2012, 2:01
What happens if something eats the jellyfish?
Comment icon #13 Posted by pallidin on 3 December, 2012, 6:40
What happens if something eats the jellyfish? Probably not a good idea. One could easily die, I suppose. Especially if it includes their poison tenticles. Not sure about the main body though. Besides which, ingestion of long-lived species apparently does not transfer their longevity to the "eater" anyway.
Comment icon #14 Posted by The New Richard Nixon on 3 December, 2012, 20:18
yes you can eat jellyfish
Comment icon #15 Posted by Pinguin on 12 December, 2012, 7:38
Jellyfish are amazing creatures. It's fascinating what we find in this world.
Comment icon #16 Posted by OldN8Dogg on 18 December, 2012, 21:55
For those of you who would like to try: haha
Comment icon #17 Posted by Mr Right Wing on 19 December, 2012, 13:44
Probably not a good idea. One could easily die, I suppose. Especially if it includes their poison tenticles. Not sure about the main body though. Besides which, ingestion of long-lived species apparently does not transfer their longevity to the "eater" anyway. Mammals have already been de-aged in the laboratory. Estradiol activates your telemeres lengthening mechanisms. Its found in milk, beans, soya and some other foods. Its also found in many contraceptive pills and levels are higher in women than in men (thats why they live longer). I recommend a pint of whole milk per day for the rest of y... [More]

Please Login or Register to post a comment.

  On the forums
Forum posts:
Forum topics:


Did Triceratops use its horns to attract a mate ?
Scientists believe that dinosaurs like Triceratops may have used their horns to impress potential partners.
Mystery 'Cotswold cat shaver' strikes again
Several cat owners in Gloucestershire have reported having their pet felines shaved by an unknown individual.
Self-driving car kills pedestrian in Arizona
The accident marks the first time that a pedestrian has ever been killed by an autonomous vehicle.
Amazon boss takes his robot dog for a walk
Tech entrepreneur Jeff Bezos attended Amazon's annual MARS conference with a very unusual companion.
Other news in this category
World's last male northern white rhino dies
Posted 3-20-2018 | 11 comments
The last remaining male of the species, Sudan, was put down on Monday after several months of ill-health....
World's last male northern white rhino 'ill'
Posted 3-2-2018 | 13 comments
Conservationists have reported that the health of the last male northern white rhino is rapidly deteriorating....
New penguin 'supercolony' found in Antarctica
Posted 3-2-2018 | 14 comments
Scientists have discovered a huge colony of over 1.5 million rare penguins on a remote Antarctic island....
Rare footage shows elusive Greenland shark
Posted 3-1-2018 | 9 comments
Two scientists have succeeded in recording very rare footage of the notoriously elusive Greenland shark....
New tardigrade species found in a car park
Posted 3-1-2018 | 4 comments
A strange new species of tardigrade, or 'water bear', has been discovered in a Japanese car park....
Mystery surrounds zoo lioness with a mane
Posted 2-25-2018 | 11 comments
Zoologists have been left puzzled by a female lion that has mysteriously sprouted mane-like head and neck hair....
Scientists to explore 'mystery' ecosystem
Posted 2-12-2018 | 4 comments
A new expedition is set to investigate an unexplored ecosystem hidden beneath a huge Antarctic iceberg....
Aquarium captures footage of hatching octopus
Posted 2-11-2018 | 5 comments
The remarkable video shows the moment a young cephalopod emerges from its egg and changes color....
Are woodpeckers damaging their own brains ?
Posted 2-4-2018 | 7 comments
The act of hitting tree trunks thousands of times may actually be giving woodpeckers brain damage....
New study finds that polar bears are starving
Posted 2-2-2018 | 9 comments
The diminishing Arctic sea ice is making it almost impossible for polar bears to satisfy their energy needs....
Killer whale learns to say 'hello' and 'bye'
Posted 1-31-2018 | 9 comments
A 14-year-old orca named Wikie has succeeded in imitating some of the words spoken by her trainer....

 View: More news in this category
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.7 © 2001-2017
Privacy Policy and Disclaimer   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ