Sunday, February 25, 2018
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help   RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in
This news story is archived which means that, while it is still available to view, the information contained within may be outdated and the original source site/link may no longer be viewable.

For the most recent stories, please visit either the site's home page or main news section.

Panama rainforest home to 25,000 species

Posted on Tuesday, 18 December, 2012 | Comment icon 7 comments


Image credit: CC 3.0 Prsjl

 
The San Lorenzo forest is estimated to be home to as many as 6,000 species of insect per acre of trees.

The largest ever survey of insects, spiders and other arthropods involving more than 100 scientists and lasting more than a decade has helped to reveal the incredible variety of species that live in the Panama rainforest. The task of cataloging the abundance of species in the region is notoriously difficult due to the creatures' small size and inaccessible habitats. To combat this, scientists used a number of different techniques such as climbing tree trunks and deploying helium balloons to reach the forest canopy.

"This is the first time that diversity of all types of arthropods has been quantified from a tropical rainforest," said ecologist Tomas Roslin. The results identified the presence of more than 25,000 arthropod species in the forest, 60% to 70% of which being previously unknown.

"A sweeping census involving more than 100 scientists and lasting almost a decade has estimated that Panama’s San Lorenzo forest is home to an estimated 25,246 arthropod species."

  View: Full article

 Source: Wired


  Discuss: View comments (7)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by King Fluffs on 18 December, 2012, 13:51
6,000 species per acre? Damn, that's quite alot.
Comment icon #2 Posted by LiveForTomorrow on 18 December, 2012, 13:54
Just arthropods too. Painstaking research. Seems like a healthy ecosystem to me, good reason to preserve this forest!
Comment icon #3 Posted by CuriousGreek on 18 December, 2012, 19:48
We must protect this ecosystem!!!
Comment icon #4 Posted by CRIPTIC CHAMELEON on 18 December, 2012, 20:47
Wow that's a lot of insects anyway now that they done their survey they can get to chopping the trees down to make way for cattle so Maca's can sell a hamburger because that's what the world needs more fast fatty food F@#K the flora & fauna we don't need that noooo .
Comment icon #5 Posted by ancient astronaut on 19 December, 2012, 2:39
Absolutely Amazing!!!!!!
Comment icon #6 Posted by UFO_Monster on 19 December, 2012, 5:50
A lot of bugs are in that rainforest. It makes you realize how little we still now about life on our planet.
Comment icon #7 Posted by Emin on 22 December, 2012, 20:28
Yes, the insects alone are enough to overwhelm. Splendid is the panama.


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


  On the forums
Mystery surrounds zoo lioness with a mane
2-25-2018
Zoologists have been left puzzled by a female lion that has mysteriously sprouted mane-like head and neck hair.
Harvard scientists develop snakeskin robot
2-25-2018
The ingenious device uses special snake-like 'scales' to help grip the ground and pull itself along.
Opportunity rover marks 5,000 days on Mars
2-24-2018
The remarkably resilient rover has managed to extend its original three-month mission to over 13 years.
Suspect goes on toilet strike for 37 days
2-24-2018
A man who was arrested after swallowing drugs has been refusing to go to the bathroom for over a month.
Other news in this category
Mystery surrounds zoo lioness with a mane
Posted 2-25-2018 | 3 comments
Zoologists have been left puzzled by a female lion that has mysteriously sprouted mane-like head and neck hair....
 
Scientists to explore 'mystery' ecosystem
Posted 2-12-2018 | 3 comments
A new expedition is set to investigate an unexplored ecosystem hidden beneath a huge Antarctic iceberg....
 
Aquarium captures footage of hatching octopus
Posted 2-11-2018 | 5 comments
The remarkable video shows the moment a young cephalopod emerges from its egg and changes color....
 
Are woodpeckers damaging their own brains ?
Posted 2-4-2018 | 7 comments
The act of hitting tree trunks thousands of times may actually be giving woodpeckers brain damage....
 
New study finds that polar bears are starving
Posted 2-2-2018 | 9 comments
The diminishing Arctic sea ice is making it almost impossible for polar bears to satisfy their energy needs....
 
Killer whale learns to say 'hello' and 'bye'
Posted 1-31-2018 | 9 comments
A 14-year-old orca named Wikie has succeeded in imitating some of the words spoken by her trainer....
 
Scientists find that mosquitoes can be trained
Posted 1-26-2018 | 4 comments
A new experiment has revealed that mosquitoes are able to remember when a person tries to swat them....
 
New fly is named after Arnold Schwarzenegger
Posted 1-24-2018 | 7 comments
A tiny fly with very strong forelegs has been named after one of the world's most famous bodybuilders....
 

 View: More news in this category
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.7 Unexplained-Mysteries.com © 2001-2017
Privacy Policy and Disclaimer   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ