Sunday, November 17, 2019
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help    |   Cookie Policy    |   Privacy Policy    RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in
This news story is archived which means that, while it is still available to view, the information contained within may be outdated and the original source site/link may no longer be viewable.

For the most recent stories, please visit either the site's home page or main news section.

Largest prime number discovered

Posted on Wednesday, 6 February, 2013 | Comment icon 28 comments | News tip by: Still Waters


Image credit: flaivoloka / sxc.hu

 
Found using an extensive network of computers, the ridiculously large number is 17,425,170 digits long.

The discovery was made by mathematician Curtis Cooper from the University of Central Missouri. To find it, Cooper used a vast network of volunteer computers known as the "Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search" with a combined total of more than 360,000 processors. The setup is similar to the SETI@Home project which uses spare processing power on people's computers to help analyze astronomical data.

"It's analogous to climbing Mount Everest," said George Woltman who invented the system. "People enjoy it for the challenge of the discovery of finding something that's never been known before."

"The largest prime number has been discovered and it's 17,425,170 digits long."

  View: Full article

 Source: NBC News


  Discuss: View comments (28)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #19 Posted by TheLastLazyGun on 7 February, 2013, 15:12
This prime is not an ordinary prime, either. It is a Mersenne prime. And, as everybody knows, a Mersenne prime can be written in the form 2p?1, meaning that it's a power of two, minus one. That's the binary number consisting of 1 followed by p zeros, with one subtracted. That, in turn, means it's the binary number that consists of the bit 1 repeated p times. Mersennes are denoted by M(p), where p is the power of 2 they're one less than, or just as Mn, where n indicates the prime's position in the pecking order. The lowest Mersenne prime is 3. All Mersennes are odd number. The new prime discove... [More]
Comment icon #20 Posted by Mnemonix on 7 February, 2013, 15:26
The largest prime number found?! This is the greatest news I've heard in a long time!
Comment icon #21 Posted by J. K. on 7 February, 2013, 15:26
I think it's rather obvious. They are researching these numbers in order to be able to count the U.S.A.'s national debt.
Comment icon #22 Posted by Frank Merton on 7 February, 2013, 15:28
Is it the largest prime number or is it the largest prime number yet found? There is a very significant difference which apparently the author of the article doesn't understand or isn't careful enough to be bothered with. Shoddy reporting at its finest. I suspect you already know this, but the way you worded your post has me wondering. We have known since ancient times that there is no largest prime.http://primes.utm.edu/notes/proofs/infinite/euclids.html
Comment icon #23 Posted by Lava_Lady on 7 February, 2013, 16:05
My point is that the writing is sloppy and the product of one who is careless and lazy. The headline states that the largest prime number has been found. This is factually incorrect since there are an infinite number of primes ... http://primes.utm.edu/notes/proofs/infinite/euclids.html If the author had taken 30 seconds to do some research, the error could have been avoided by using something like "yet discovered" and then could have explained the difficulty in finding these large primes, how awesome the discoveries are, the significance, etc. It is the imprecision and carelessness that most ... [More]
Comment icon #24 Posted by magzire on 7 February, 2013, 16:38
Forgive my noobness but whats the big deal of a large prime number?
Comment icon #25 Posted by AsteroidX on 7 February, 2013, 16:40
I believe it was the economics dept figuring what our future debt clock is going to need to be calibrated for.
Comment icon #26 Posted by H132 on 8 February, 2013, 20:13
My point is that the writing is sloppy and the product of one who is careless and lazy. The headline states that the largest prime number has been found. This is factually incorrect since there are an infinite number of primes ... http://primes.utm.ed...te/euclids.html If the author had taken 30 seconds to do some research, the error could have been avoided by using something like "yet discovered" and then could have explained the difficulty in finding these large primes, how awesome the discoveries are, the significance, etc. It is the imprecision and carelessness that most irk me And "since ... [More]
Comment icon #27 Posted by Iron_Lotus on 10 February, 2013, 6:56
Comment icon #28 Posted by shrooma on 14 February, 2013, 12:56
I know a prime number that's 17,425,171 digits long! i'd type it out so you could check the veracity, but well, you know, my dinner break is only half an hour long.....


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


  On the forums
Forum posts:
Forum topics:
Members:

6593069
275566
182645

 
Egypt hints at 'mummified lion' discovery
11-17-2019
Archaeologists in Egypt have discovered the mummy of a very large animal, most likely a lion or lioness.
Unsettling baby cam image creeps out parents
11-17-2019
When a couple recently acquired a baby monitor, the image it produced wasn't quite what they were expecting.
Officers were ordered to erase UFO evidence
11-17-2019
Former USS Nimitz officers claim that 'unknown individuals' ordered them to hand over all the recordings.
'Bigfoot screams' video continues to intrigue
11-16-2019
A recording of terrifying howling sounds coming from the woods of rural Canada still lacks a definitive explanation.
Other news in this category
Blade Runner's gritty cyberpunk future is now
Posted 11-5-2019 | 3 comments
Ridley Scott's science fiction epic was set in November 2019 - so where are the flying cars and replicants ?...
 
Is this what we will look like in 20 years' time ?
Posted 10-30-2019 | 24 comments
Researchers have created a life-sized model of what the typical office worker of the future might look like....
 
Lab-grown brains could be 'sentient and in pain'
Posted 10-28-2019 | 28 comments
Scientists have warned that miniature brains grown in the lab may have become conscious and could be suffering....
 
Do US nuclear forces still rely on floppy disks?
Posted 10-27-2019 | 11 comments
A few years ago it was revealed that US Strategic Command used floppy disks for its nuclear operations....
 
Is there another 'you' in a parallel universe ?
Posted 10-26-2019 | 32 comments
The 'many worlds' hypothesis suggests the existence of countless other universes similar to ours but different....
 
US Navy's 'Doomsday' plane taken out by a bird
Posted 10-19-2019 | 13 comments
An aircraft designed to survive a nuclear apocalypse recently suffered a rather unfortunate mishap....
 
New 'invisibility cloak' is remarkably effective
Posted 10-18-2019 | 13 comments
A Canadian company has come up with a new material that can render large objects almost totally invisible....
 
'Helical engine' could reach relativistic speeds
Posted 10-16-2019 | 13 comments
NASA engineer David Burns has developed a concept for a new drive capable of reaching distant solar systems....
 
Navy 'UFO-tech' engineer patents fusion reactor
Posted 10-10-2019 | 7 comments
A US Navy scientist behind numerous exotic technology patents has now patented a compact fusion reactor....
 
Revealed: the safest places to be in a pandemic
Posted 10-7-2019 | 2 comments
Scientists have published a list of the countries that would remain the safest in the event of an outbreak....
 
Paralyzed man walks again using exoskeleton
Posted 10-4-2019 | 7 comments
This brain-controlled exoskeleton has made it possible for a tetraplegic to take his first steps unaided....
 

 View: More news in this category
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.712 Unexplained-Mysteries.com (c) 2001-2019
Terms   |   Privacy Policy   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ