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When giant insects ruled the world

Posted on Thursday, 12 October, 2006 | Comment icon 14 comments


Image credit: Lidewijde/Wikimedia
 
"The delicate lady bug in your garden could be frighteningly large if only there was a greater concentration of oxygen in the air, a new study concludes."

  View: Full article

 Source: Physorg


  Discuss: View comments (14)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #5 Posted by Lizardian_guy on 13 October, 2006, 11:45
I don't want to burst your bubble, but that's rather old news. The theory that the size of arthropods is proportionnal to the concentration of oxygen in the atmosphere is rather old.
Comment icon #6 Posted by frogfish on 13 October, 2006, 20:42
There used to be 15 foot-long terrestial crustaceans related to pillbugs.
Comment icon #7 Posted by Purplos on 19 October, 2006, 4:23
Volkswagon busses.... (those pillbug things... just reminded me) Very cool 2 foot dragonflies. Sigh...
Comment icon #8 Posted by smallpackage on 19 October, 2006, 19:35
Why not put it to the test and allow them to grow in a high oxygen chamber of some sort?
Comment icon #9 Posted by Mister E. on 19 October, 2006, 20:09
There used to be 15 foot-long terrestial crustaceans related to pillbugs. As well as scorpions 1m long, centipede relatives up to 2.6m long, and spiders the size of a human head. *hugs The BBC Complete Guide to Prehistoric Life* It's taught me so much...
Comment icon #10 Posted by War-Junkie on 19 October, 2006, 20:18
it would take a long time for them to evolve to get bigger wouldent it? if you put them in a chamber
Comment icon #11 Posted by Pax Unum on 19 October, 2006, 20:44
Why not put it to the test and allow them to grow in a high oxygen chamber of some sort? I was wondering the same... using some insects that have short life cycles, you'd think in a couple dozen generations, you would see some increase in size, if this was true...
Comment icon #12 Posted by ROGER on 19 October, 2006, 23:11
The Earths gravity was less in Pre historic times also! Every day space dust and rocks fall to Earth making it fatter! Fatter means more gravity , smaller is less!
Comment icon #13 Posted by Pax Unum on 19 October, 2006, 23:14
The Earths gravity was less in Pre historic times also! Every day space dust and rocks fall to Earth making it fatter! Fatter means more gravity , smaller is less! so, maybe they can run the experiment on the ISS... I'd like to see the results... run, it's Mothra!!
Comment icon #14 Posted by ROGER on 19 October, 2006, 23:32
Mothra wasn't so big! Thous Girls were small. Not much of a figure either. Must have been Freshman!


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