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Top 20 longest animal lifespans



A look at which species of animal have the longest lifespans in comparison to that of a human.

   

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Recent comments on this video
Comment icon #1 Posted by Magiclass on 3 December, 2012, 16:04
What about Giant Tortoise, they can live to 200 years!
Comment icon #2 Posted by CuriousGreek on 3 December, 2012, 16:17
What about Giant Tortoise, they can live to 200 years! Probably missed that one or decided to show only some of the species, which have a long lifespan.
Comment icon #3 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 3 December, 2012, 16:25
The Giant Tortoise is in there, at number 3 with 177 years.
Comment icon #4 Posted by Still Waters on 3 December, 2012, 22:35
Very interesting to see some of those on the top 20 list. I enjoyed that video
Comment icon #5 Posted by CRIPTIC CHAMELEON on 4 December, 2012, 7:19
Wow I didn't know whales could live that long.
Comment icon #6 Posted by Pinguin on 12 December, 2012, 7:49
I learned something today. Very cool video. By the way, I don't think I would hold that Giant Salamander.


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