Wednesday, December 19, 2018
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help    |   Cookie Policy    |   Privacy Policy    RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in

Underwater 'lost world' found off Tasmania


Posted on Wednesday, 10 October, 2018 | Comment icon 3 comments

Scans have revealed multiple seamounts on the ocean floor. Image Credit: CSIRO
A deep sea research vessel has discovered a chain of underwater mountains that are teeming with life.
The discovery was made by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) vessel Investigator during efforts to map the sea floor off the coast of Tasmania.

Despite rising over 3,000 meters above the sea floor, the seamounts, which were formed by volcanic activity millions of years ago, still remain 2,000 meters beneath the ocean's surface.

"Our multibeam mapping has revealed in vibrant detail, for the first time, a chain of volcanic seamounts rising up from an abyssal plain about 5000 meters deep," said Dr Tara Martin.

"The seamounts vary in size and shape, with some having sharp peaks while others have wide flat plateaus, dotted with small conical hills that would have been formed by ancient volcanic activity."

What makes the find particularly interesting is the sheer amount of marine life observed at the site. It is thought that the seamounts may be an important stopping off point for several migratory species.

"While we were over the chain of seamounts, the ship was visited by large numbers of humpback and long-finned pilot whales," said Dr Eric Woehler from BirdLife Tasmania.

"We estimated that at least 28 individual humpback whales visited us on one day, followed by a pod of 60-80 long-finned pilot whales the next."

"These seamounts may act as an important signpost on an underwater migratory highway for the humpback whales we saw moving from their winter breeding to summer feeding grounds."


Source: News.com.au | Comments (3)

Tags: Seamounts, Tasmania

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Carlos Allende on 10 October, 2018, 18:20
I mean, would Brian Blessed still be willing to climb mountains if they were under water and he wouldn't be able to shout?
Comment icon #2 Posted by DieChecker on 12 October, 2018, 9:11
I showed this to my 7 year old son and he says, "How could they be lost if they've always been there?". 
Comment icon #3 Posted by curiouse on 15 October, 2018, 8:43
How Amazing. How Cool.


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


  On the forums
Forum posts:
Forum topics:
Members:

6349750
268601
178389

 
102-year-old becomes world's oldest skydiver
12-19-2018
Great-grandmother Irene O'Shea made history earlier this month when she jumped out of an airplane.
Parrot orders shopping using Amazon Alexa
12-18-2018
A parrot named Rocco has been driving his owner up the wall by ordering items using Amazon's voice assistant.
Distant solar system object 'Farout' discovered
12-18-2018
Astronomers have identified the farthest known object in our solar system at a distance of 11 billion miles.
China and Russia modify Earth's atmosphere
12-17-2018
The two world powers have reportedly been working together on a series of controversial experiments.
Featured Videos
Gallery icon 
The logistics of climbing Everest
Posted 12-16-2018 | 2 comments
A look at what it really takes to reach the summit of Mt. Everest.
 
Humboldt squid takes a bite
Posted 12-10-2018 | 1 comment
A look at what happened when Steve Backshall met a rather large Humboldt squid.
 
Rainbow jelly tennis
Posted 12-3-2018 | 0 comments
The Slo Mo Guys attempt another ridiculous slow motion experiment involving jelly.
 
 View: More videos
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.712 Unexplained-Mysteries.com (c) 2001-2018
Terms   |   Privacy Policy   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ