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Self-repairing 'living wire' developed

Posted on Monday, 28 January, 2013 | Comment icon 8 comments | News tip by: Still Waters


Image credit: NCSU

 
Science fiction has become science fact as scientists invent a wire that can fix itself when cut.

A team at North Carolina State University have created an electricity-conducting wire with a liquid metal core composed of gallium and indium which is housed inside a stretchable polymer sheath. When the wire is cut the liquid alloy inside oxidizes and hardens so that when the two ends are reconnected the current will still flow and the wire is in fully working order again without the need to manually solder it back together.

In the future such self-repairing wires could prove invaluable in situations where it is too difficult or dangerous to perform manual repairs. The mechanism can also be used to form complex microfluidic networks by performing strategic cuts and re-connecting the pieces in a different order.

"The liquid alloy isn't the only amazing thing about this wire: The outer polymer sheath is also self-healing."

  View: Full article

 Source: Live Science


  Discuss: View comments (8)

   


 

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Armchair Educated on 27 January, 2013, 13:35
and so the war with the machines begins
Comment icon #2 Posted by -Mr_Fess- on 28 January, 2013, 15:09
That's gonna really mess with the bomb squad. I keep cutting the red wire and it keep fixing itself! ^ yep, the world of the terminator isn't so far off anymore. Robots, drones, nanotechnology and now self healing liquid metal. I think the terminator world took place in 2027. Not positive but I think and it seems about the track we are on. Here comes Skynet.
Comment icon #3 Posted by sergeantflynn on 28 January, 2013, 19:35
It says `when you put the two wires together again the current flows` . AGAIN being the operative word .
Comment icon #4 Posted by -Mr_Fess- on 28 January, 2013, 19:39
It says `when you put the two wires together again the current flows` . AGAIN being the operative word . Ok, so you still have to touch them back together. I think if they can figure out how to create regenerative liquid/solid metal they'll probably have no problem working out little kinks like that.
Comment icon #5 Posted by ozman on 29 January, 2013, 3:15
If you noticed his hand's, he was using big force to attach them back together so the action of him pushing them hard together is what forces the molecules to fuse otherwise I doubt they would fuse back together if he just simply placed them together without hard force.
Comment icon #6 Posted by FlyingAngel on 29 January, 2013, 8:40
Incoming auto healing machine war robot!!
Comment icon #7 Posted by dododoit on 6 February, 2013, 20:34
Now this will be good for iPhone jacks ,as im always breaking them.
Comment icon #8 Posted by H132 on 8 February, 2013, 21:10
Well if you're gonna have a giant brown squishy chewy piece of Chicklet holding the wires together then yah, duh...


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