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Study shows humans killed off the thylacine


Posted on Saturday, 2 February, 2013 | Comment icon 28 comments | News tip by: the L


Image credit: Hobart Zoo

 
Humans alone were responsible for the extinction of the Tasmanian Tiger, new research has found.

The thylacine is often considered to be a symbol of a species' extinction at the hands of humans, but up until now it was thought that disease also played a significant role in their ultimate demise. New research has put paid to this idea however, suggesting that the extinction of the Tasmanian Tiger was the result of human activities alone.

Thylacines were plentiful across Tasmania before Europeans arrived in 1803. By 1886 however the government was offering bounties to people in exchange for thylacine carcasses and before long their numbers had dwindled. The last known living thylacine was captured in 1933 and died in 1936.

"Humans alone were responsible for the demise of Australia's extinct native predator, the Tasmanian Tiger, or thylacine, a new study has found."

  View: Full article |  Source: The Australian

  Discuss: View comments (28)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #19 Posted by csspwns on 4 February, 2013, 5:55
yea europeans are fruckers
Comment icon #20 Posted by Chooky88 on 4 February, 2013, 15:09
What moron funded this study? Every Aussie knows this as a fact we wiped em out in about 50 years as a bounty to protection sheep farmers. what is the next study? Humans are responsible for wars? People find that a good rack is likely to lead to more funding of inane useless studies???
Comment icon #21 Posted by freetoroam on 4 February, 2013, 16:58
I can believe this people been killing off animals for millions of years We have not been around for millions of years.
Comment icon #22 Posted by Mantis914 on 4 February, 2013, 17:18
Beautiful animal... Would be nice to see one out in wild as a cryptid but little chance of that happening...
Comment icon #23 Posted by freetoroam on 4 February, 2013, 17:24
yea europeans are fruckers Are you ok with an african man murdering the elephants to sell the tusks to a Chinese man? Fruckers are not just limited to one race.
Comment icon #24 Posted by MJNYC on 4 February, 2013, 18:15
Shame on us. All of us.
Comment icon #25 Posted by Lady Llayne on 5 February, 2013, 16:24
I have to admit, if you think about it, its not a big surprise that we wiped them out... Humanity is a plauge unto itself. Which itself is set for it own destruction.
Comment icon #26 Posted by ReddWolfe on 6 February, 2013, 2:56
i love thylacine, this is probably correct we also whiped out the dodos.
Comment icon #27 Posted by CH32 on 10 February, 2013, 23:39
Did we not already know this? What else did hunters try to blame the Thyacline's extinction on? Thyaclines had managed so well for so long, man kind are the spanner in the works. Yeah... that was how I had also always understood it !
Comment icon #28 Posted by Sundew on 17 February, 2013, 4:16
Humans certainly are responsible given the bounty on the animals but disease could have also been a factor. It's possible that the introduction of placental mammals as unintentional prey items (like sheep, cats, rabbits, etc.) could have introduced diseases in an already dwindling population. Currently there is a contagious form of cancer that is killing of the Tasmanian Devils, who have taken the place of the Thylacine as top predator on the island. There was some article I read on the web that said early settlers to Tasmania occasionally kept the Thylacine as a pet whenever they found a youn... [More]


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