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Ghosts & Hauntings

Scientific evidence of poltergeist knocking ?

By T.K. Randall
July 3, 2010 · Comment icon 18 comments



Image Credit: J. Smith
A new study in to sounds attributed to poltergeist activity has revealed startling differences to conventional sounds.
Paranormal rappings associated with apparent poltergeist activity have been described for many hundreds of years. It is only now that an interesting pattern has been discovered within the fine detail of the paranormal rapping sounds. No explanation can be found for this pattern at present.


Source: SPR | Comments (18)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #9 Posted by TinkyBlink 12 years ago
Wow, very interesting!
Comment icon #10 Posted by Codehook 12 years ago
Actually this is nothing surprising if you go by the standard scientific theory that 'paranormal' knocking sounds are not paranormal at all and are, in fact, simply static noise from recording devices with auto-leveling (or from recordings that have been compressed or amplified). This is very well noted on a recent 'Derren Brown Investigates' documentary regarding exactly this type of phenomenon. The type of devices I mention purposely amplify sound input in low-signal environments (to effectively record somebody speaking quietly, for example). Recordings from devices other than these can be a... [More]
Comment icon #11 Posted by SAmbag 12 years ago
Actually this is nothing surprising if you go by the standard scientific theory that 'paranormal' knocking sounds are not paranormal at all and are, in fact, simply static noise from recording devices with auto-leveling (or from recordings that have been compressed or amplified). This is very well noted on a recent 'Derren Brown Investigates' documentary regarding exactly this type of phenomenon. The type of devices I mention purposely amplify sound input in low-signal environments (to effectively record somebody speaking quietly, for example). Recordings from devices other than these can be a... [More]
Comment icon #12 Posted by pinewengland 12 years ago
Most people don't know that EMF can cause what sounds like "EVPS", that's not the answer for all possible EVPS, but should be considered! And found Codehook's reply very interesting. And i'm going to find more info on it. thank you.
Comment icon #13 Posted by GPS 12 years ago
Anyone care to speculate as to what might cause these noises in non-paranormal (or paranormal) terms? The sound signatures in the paper, which rise to a peak intensity more slowly than an 'ordinary' knock, can be explained by the fact that the sound is coming through a solid. Poltergesit raps are usually said to emerge from walls, furniture and other objects. When sound goes through a solid object it splits into two modes of transmission - transverse and longitudinal - one of which goes twice as fast as the other. Thus part of the sound is slowed down relative to the other, causing the kind of... [More]
Comment icon #14 Posted by sinewave 12 years ago
Unfortunately, much of the science (if any) is left out in this deion. It would be useful to know how the recordings were made. What kinds of recording gear were used and what controls were implemented to identify and filter out noise. Simply recording something and calling it unexplained does not mean it came from beyond. Further, he uses just one type of acoustic signature as a control which is hardly representative of of all possible sound sources in all conditions. The findings are merely speculative as it is entirely possible to achieve a less abrupt peak by placing acoustically absorbent... [More]
Comment icon #15 Posted by sinewave 12 years ago
Most people don't know that EMF can cause what sounds like "EVPS", that's not the answer for all possible EVPS, but should be considered! And found Codehook's reply very interesting. And i'm going to find more info on it. thank you. Exactly. EM fields are always around us and can affect some kinds of recording gear. This is likely what ghost busters tend to call EVPs.
Comment icon #16 Posted by JohnSage 12 years ago
It's easy to simply state "we have considered all natural causes and nothing fits!" I would be very interested in a comprehensive list of all considered altenitives. Still I find the research fascinating and the potential implications have sent a chill down my spine.
Comment icon #17 Posted by Belial 12 years ago
This all sounds great, BUT - just how does science know and understand what a ghostly sound sounds like, just what is there for them to make a comparison and then the massive claim?
Comment icon #18 Posted by GPS 12 years ago
In the paper, the time taken to reach peak sound intensity is typically in the region of 0.01 to 0.05s. This corresponds with what you'd expect if part of the sound had been reflected from walls in a typical domestic room. You only get the really fast peak sound intensity if the tape recorder is close to the sound source (wuthin a couple of metres) when reflections are negligible. Thus, there doesn't seem to be anything unusual or inexplicable about the sounds shown in the paper. In addition, the lack of a high frequency component in the sounds is also what you'd expect if the sound source was... [More]


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