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Archaeology & History

Queen Nefertiti bust may have had a facelift

By T.K. Randall
September 20, 2010 · Comment icon 5 comments



Image Credit: Xenon77 / Wikimedia
A 3,300 year old bust of the Egyptian Queen Nefertiti has revealed evidence of alteration to correct flaws.
The modification of her nose and the smoothing of creases around her mouth were two of the changes the sculptor appears to have made in the interests of making Nefertiti appear more beautiful in the sculpted piece.
An ancient Egyptian queen who was been hailed for thousands of years as the perfect example of beauty may not have been such a looker after all, researchers have claimed.


Source: Daily Mail | Comments (5)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Great Big Sea 13 years ago
I thought that was interesting when they mentioned that on the series Ancients Behaving Badly on the History network. Interesting what you can learn that way.
Comment icon #2 Posted by farandaway 13 years ago
Influenced by an ancient ancestor of Hugh Hefner no doubt. Maybe the sculptor thought if he depicted her as perfect, she would get more respect.
Comment icon #3 Posted by meankitty 13 years ago
Maybe the sculptor thought if he depicted her as perfect, she would get more respect. Maybe sculptor gets more money for a prettier statue
Comment icon #4 Posted by slowfade 13 years ago
Royal portrait painters in past were basically paid to flatter the sitter - for example, Queen Elizabeth I was painted as a young woman well into her older years, and Henry VIII married his fourth wife Anne of Cleves on the strength of a Holbein portrait of her that was probably very flattering to poor Anne, who was almost immediately rejected by Henry as ugly when he finally met her. In a lot of cases, this 'flattery' was about the image that the monarch wished to project to their subjects and to other, rival royals. Almost controlling their press, if you will. Perhaps this was the case here?
Comment icon #5 Posted by Eldorado 13 years ago
Royal portrait painters in past were basically paid to flatter the sitter - for example, Queen Elizabeth I was painted as a young woman well into her older years, and Henry VIII married his fourth wife Anne of Cleves on the strength of a Holbein portrait of her that was probably very flattering to poor Anne, who was almost immediately rejected by Henry as ugly when he finally met her. In a lot of cases, this 'flattery' was about the image that the monarch wished to project to their subjects and to other, rival royals. Almost controlling their press, if you will. Perhaps this was the case here?... [More]


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