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Natural World

Very rare whale filmed for the first time

November 1, 2015 | Comment icon 3 comments



The whale was filmed up close. Image Credit: YouTube / New England Aquarium / Salvatore Cerchio
Researchers have managed to record the first ever footage of one of the world's most elusive whales.
The species, which is so rare that there had never even been a confirmed sighting of one in the wild until now, remains a bit of an enigma and nobody knows exactly how many of them there might be.

Measuring up to 38ft in length, the Omura's whale is smaller than the blue whale and looks very similar to the Bryde's whale which has made locating a live specimen quite challenging.

"Over the years, there have been a small handful of possible sightings of Omura's whales, but nothing that was confirmed," said Salvatore Cerchio of the New England Aquarium.

The new footage, which was filmed off the coast of Madagascar, can be viewed below.



Source: Huffington Post | Comments (3)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by DieChecker 7 years ago
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omura%27s_whale The scientific deion of this whale was made in Nature in 2003 by three Japanese scientists. They determined the existence of the species by analysing the morphology and mitochondrial DNA of nine individuals – eight caught by Japanese research vessels in the late 1970s in the Indo-Pacific and an adult female collected in 1998 from Tsunoshima, an island in the Sea of Japan. I wonder if by research vessels, they mean the Japanese whaling fleet?
Comment icon #2 Posted by Hawkin 7 years ago
Interesting that this species of whale was found off Madagascar. Just like the Coelacanth was rediscovered in the region off East Africa.
Comment icon #3 Posted by DieChecker 7 years ago
From what I find quickly online, the whale was only previously known in the East Indies, specifically around Indonesia and the Philippines... http://carnivoraforu...pic/10295858/1/


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