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Dalhousie Mountain carvings mystery endures


Posted on Sunday, 19 November, 2017 | Comment icon 3 comments

Did tourists carve the names during the 19th century ? Image Credit: CC BY-SA 3.0 Donar Reiskoffer
A series of names carved in to the rocks of Dalhousie Mountain are thought to date back over 100 years.
Discovered by workers in the 80s or 90s during construction of the New Brunswick trail, the Dalhousie Mountain carvings remain one of Canada's most enduring mysteries.

The names were found nestled beneath moss and grass in the middle of nowhere and appear to date back at least as far as 1880 judging by the inclusion of timestamps on some of the carvings.

"We found [them] by accident," said Gary Archibald, one of the workers who discovered the names.

"We didn't want to open up too much of the mountain to see how many names was there because we didn't want to deteriorate it. The moss had been protecting them."

One theory suggests that the names were left by tourists visiting Dalhousie back when it was a summer resort during the late 19th and early 20th century.

A local hotel, Inch Arran House, opened in 1884.

"It predated the Algonquin by a number of years," said Bill Clarke, the director of the Restigouche Regional Museum. "I suspect some of the people who were vacationing at Inch Arran House would hike up there and add their names to the rocks."

Source: CBC.ca | Comments (3)

Tags: Dalhousie Mountain

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by evalha on 20 November, 2017, 1:09
carvings of name 100 years old??  MIND BLOWN    MYSTERY OF THE AGES
Comment icon #2 Posted by seanjo on 20 November, 2017, 10:06
"One theory suggests that the names were left by tourists visiting Dalhousie back when it was a summer resort during the late 19th and early 20th century."   Mystery solved I would say...
Comment icon #3 Posted by Noxasa on 20 November, 2017, 10:39
I think the point is not the age of the carvings, but the fact that, under moss and grass, they were even found at all.  They could have easily been lost forever with only those who had carved them, and long in the grave, ever knowing they existed.  There's a quite beauty to that concept, I think.  Maybe if some of us carve our names on a rock in the back woods somewhere, that someday in the distant future, maybe thousands of years, someone may find it and wonder.  :-) 


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