Tuesday, January 23, 2018
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help   RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in

Huge black holes regulate star formation


Posted on Tuesday, 2 January, 2018 | Comment icon 3 comments

Supermassive black holes impact how rapidly a galaxy forms new stars. Image Credit: Nick Risinger
Scientists have found the first direct evidence that supermassive black holes control the formation of stars.
These gargantuan galactic phenomena, which range in size from hundreds of thousands to billions of times the mass of our sun, are thought to be found at the center of most large galaxies.

Now for the first time, researchers have found direct evidence to support the idea that the mass of a supermassive black hole can directly impact the rate of star formation within its galaxy.

The study, which was carried out at the University of California, involved analyzing the spectra of galaxies with previously recorded supermassive black holes and finding a correlation between the mass of these black holes and the point at which their galaxies stopped producing stars.

"For galaxies with the same mass of stars but different black hole mass in the center, those galaxies with bigger black holes were quenched earlier and faster than those with smaller black holes," said Martin-Navarro. "So star formation lasted longer in those galaxies with smaller central black holes."

Exactly why this should be the case however remains unclear.

"There are different ways a black hole can put energy out into the galaxy, and theorists have all kinds of ideas about how quenching happens, but there's more work to be done to fit these new observations into the models," said study co-author Aaron Romanowsky.

Source: The Atlantic | Comments (3)

Tags: Supermassive, Black Hole

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by paperdyer on 4 January, 2018, 17:48
Think of a bungie cord, The galaxy is at the end of it at the furthermost point. Since the universe is still expanding the "cord" is still stretching. Sooner or later the cord snaps back into the black hole, another big bang and it starts all over again with slightly different amounts of matter depending on what comets and meteors are in the area.
Comment icon #2 Posted by Erno86 on 14 January, 2018, 19:58
Here's a pretty good PBS NOVA video on how black holes regulate star formation....TITLED: xxxxxxxxxxx "Black Hole Apocalypse" xxxxxxxxxxxx http://www.pbs.org/video/black-hole-apocalypse-yj34qi/
Comment icon #3 Posted by Erno86 on 17 January, 2018, 20:09
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx "Four Types of Black Holes" xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/space/four-types-black-holes.html


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


  On the forums
Study shows cats can be right or left-pawed
1-22-2018
It's not only humans who favor one hand over the other - cats seem to share this preference as well.
Man dies after dog accidentally shoots him
1-22-2018
An experienced hunter from Russia has died in a freak accident involving one of his own hunting dogs.
Scientists make tractor beam breakthrough
1-22-2018
An acoustic tractor beam could make it possible to levitate large objects within the not-too-distant future.
Weather blamed for 200,000 antelope deaths
1-21-2018
Scientists may have finally determined what caused vast numbers of saiga antelopes to die back in 2015.
Featured Videos
Gallery icon 
Brian Cox talks to Buzz Aldrin
Posted 1-18-2018 | 1 comment
Professor Brian Cox discusses space travel with legendary astronaut Buzz Aldrin.
 
Typing vs handwriting
Posted 1-16-2018 | 2 comments
Is typing on a computer better or worse for your memory then writing on paper ?
 
Can coding help avoid job automation ?
Posted 1-12-2018 | 0 comments
Taking up coding and technical skills to avoid automation may be counter-productive.
 
 View: More videos
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.7 Unexplained-Mysteries.com 2001-2017
Privacy Policy and Disclaimer   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ