Tuesday, December 18, 2018
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help    |   Cookie Policy    |   Privacy Policy    RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in

Mars trip radiation exposure levels revealed


Posted on Thursday, 20 September, 2018 | Comment icon 12 comments

Radiation is still a major concern for astronauts. Image Credit: NASA/Pat Rawlings
Scientists have calculated the minimum level of radiation that an astronaut will be exposed to on a trip to Mars.
There is certainly no denying that journeying to other worlds is a seriously risky business.

While the astronauts on the space station are afforded some protection from the Sun's radiation thanks to the Earth's protective magnetic field, the first humans to venture to Mars will have disturbingly few options available when it comes to avoiding a potentially lethal dose.

Some studies have even suggested that journeying to Mars at all may be a death sentence with astronauts receiving several times the survivable dose of radiation over the course of the trip.

Now though, thanks to new data from ESA's ExoMars orbiter, it has been revealed that radiation exposure levels during a round trip to Mars may not be quite as bad as previously thought.

In total, scientists claim, astronauts can expect to receive as little as 60 percent of their maximum recommended career radiation exposure during a trip to Mars that takes 6 months both ways.

While this is still a lot, it is at least survivable, meaning that such a trip may be genuinely achievable.

Source: Engadget | Comments (12)

Tags: Mars, Radiation

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #3 Posted by L.A.T.1961 on 20 September, 2018, 20:15
I don't think shielding is a difficult technical challenge, water can be used but it would add weight to any spacecraft and so it's back to the old problem of launching heavy payloads along with pushing and fuelling a heavy ship. †
Comment icon #4 Posted by Timothy on 20 September, 2018, 21:04
It ainít so bad. There are many people willing to take the risk†for humanity/the sheer experience of it/whatever floats your boat etc. Iíd do it. Would probably have some sperm frozen first though.
Comment icon #5 Posted by seanjo on 20 September, 2018, 22:16
† It's all about weight. Lead stops radiation because it's dense and therefore heavy.†
Comment icon #6 Posted by Seti42 on 20 September, 2018, 22:26
I'm sure at some point in the future, we'll either develop light-weight and effective radiation shielding, or vastly more efficient propulsion systems where all the extra weight won't matter. We just haven't yet.
Comment icon #7 Posted by OverSword on 20 September, 2018, 23:50
60% of alleged survivable dose (I say alleged because it's going to vary from person to person) No thank you.
Comment icon #8 Posted by ExpandMyMind on 21 September, 2018, 1:26
60% of the recommended dosage for an astronaut for his whole career, I believe. So just less total trips in space for whoever goes. Not an especially worrying amount for general health.
Comment icon #9 Posted by OverSword on 21 September, 2018, 3:20
Unless there is a solar flare perhaps?
Comment icon #10 Posted by ExpandMyMind on 21 September, 2018, 8:34
I guess. But then they'd have super powers so I don't think they'd care.
Comment icon #11 Posted by OverSword on 21 September, 2018, 13:35
True. And when they got back they could run for president bringing us to a new low
Comment icon #12 Posted by L.A.T.1961 on 21 September, 2018, 18:28
It looks like they have only calculated dosage rates for the flight, not the stop on Mars. So the total exposure could be 100% + of a total recommended limit. Not sure how that would compare to the risk to life just flying the mission, multiple take off and landings Ect. There are lots of ways to be injured or worse attempting something like this.†


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


  On the forums
Forum posts:
Forum topics:
Members:

6348965
268573
178378

 
Distant solar system object 'Farout' discovered
12-18-2018
Astronomers have identified the farthest known object in our solar system at a distance of 11 billion miles.
China and Russia modify Earth's atmosphere
12-17-2018
The two world powers have reportedly been working together on a series of controversial experiments.
Prehistoric feathers found preserved in amber
12-17-2018
Scientists have discovered some rather unusual feathers within pieces of amber dating back 100 million years.
Nuclear 'tunnelbot' could explore Europa
12-17-2018
NASA has proposed a new mission to delve deep beneath the icy crust of Jupiter's moon Europa.
Featured Videos
Gallery icon 
The logistics of climbing Everest
Posted 12-16-2018 | 2 comments
A look at what it really takes to reach the summit of Mt. Everest.
 
Humboldt squid takes a bite
Posted 12-10-2018 | 1 comment
A look at what happened when Steve Backshall met a rather large Humboldt squid.
 
Rainbow jelly tennis
Posted 12-3-2018 | 0 comments
The Slo Mo Guys attempt another ridiculous slow motion experiment involving jelly.
 
Progress launch timelapse
Posted 11-24-2018 | 0 comments
A look at the recent launch of the Russian Progress MS-10 cargo spacecraft.
 
The unique wildlife of the Cairngorms
Posted 11-16-2018 | 1 comment
A look at the breathtaking snowy wilds of Scotland's Cairngorm Mountains.
 
 View: More videos
Stories & Experiences
My name is whispered
11-9-2018 | Wish not to disclose
 
Strange numbers on arm
11-9-2018 | Charlotte, NC
 
Two experiences
10-31-2018 | Pryor, OK
 
Various experiences
10-31-2018 | Californiia
 
A transparent figure
10-31-2018 | Nigeria
 
My childhood haunting
10-29-2018 | Cincinnati, Ohio
 
Orange, hovering, atom-like figure
10-25-2018 | West kelowna
 
I saw a strange man
10-25-2018 | Croatia
 
Spontaneous exorcisms
10-25-2018 | Canada
 
Two children who didn't age
10-24-2018 | United States New York
 

         More stories | Send us your story
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.712 Unexplained-Mysteries.com (c) 2001-2018
Terms   |   Privacy Policy   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ