Sunday, November 19, 2017
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help   RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in
This news story is archived which means that, while it is still available to view, the information contained within may be outdated and the original source site/link may no longer be viewable.

For the most recent stories, please visit either the site's home page or main news section.

Andromedia galaxy to collide with Milky Way

Posted on Friday, 1 June, 2012 | Comment icon 25 comments | News tip by: Waspie_Dwarf


Image credit: NASA

 
NASA astronomers have announced that the nearest galaxy is on a collision course with our own.

It's not something anyone alive today is going to need to be too worried about however, Andromeda is over 2.5 million lights years away and won't reach us for another 4 billion years. When the two galaxies meet it is thought that due to the distance between stars it is unlikely that they will collide directly, instead being thrown in to different orbits.

"After nearly a century of speculation about the future destiny of Andromeda and our Milky Way, we at last have a clear picture of how events will unfold over the coming billions of years," said Sangmo Tony Sohn.

"NASA astronomers announced Thursday they can now predict with certainty the next major cosmic event to affect our galaxy, sun, and solar system: the titanic collision of our Milky Way galaxy with the neighboring Andromeda galaxy."

  View: Full article

 Source: NASA


  Discuss: View comments (25)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #16 Posted by esperwolf on 2 June, 2012, 18:49
Amazing, Oh if only I could be alive to see this. It isn't doomsday but the rebirth of a solar system. Imagine this the first ever galaxy with two suns. An Earth with a oval rotation instead of rounded. Days would last a lot longer with only a few hours of darkness. We may even obtain another moon in our orbit. We would not have another ice age but a Desert Age of sands...sounds like a Sci-Fi flick...never mind me I'm just rambling.
Comment icon #17 Posted by Pyridium on 2 June, 2012, 19:53
The real news here is that we have now been able to measure the direction and speed with absolute accuracy. 4 years ago we could see that both galaxies were moving toward each other, but now the proof is in...a direct collision. This is also proof that gravity has been attracting each other for a very long time, to the point where a direct collision is unavoidable. Gotta luv mother nature. Any gravitational pull strong enough to pull our sun will result in the total disruption of our solar system.
Comment icon #18 Posted by sepulchrave on 2 June, 2012, 21:09
THIS IS A REAL DOOMSDAY PREDICTION! lucky for us its 4,000,000,000 years away. we actually have EVIDENCE this time. not like the other doomsday predictions no offense howard camping No. This will probably not have any noticeable impact on the Earth. Amazing, Oh if only I could be alive to see this. It isn't doomsday but the rebirth of a solar system. Imagine this the first ever galaxy with two suns. An Earth with a oval rotation instead of rounded. Days would last a lot longer with only a few hours of darkness. We may even obtain another moon in our orbit. We would not have another ice age but... [More]
Comment icon #19 Posted by Mentalcase on 2 June, 2012, 22:42
To add to what Sepulchrave said, the stars of both galaxies are so far apart, it is likely that most solar systems will be unaffected. Would be a nice sight in the sky though. Our sun may be a red giant around this period.
Comment icon #20 Posted by St.Anger on 4 June, 2012, 8:19
People are worrying about this now,but who knows, the human race might become extinct way before. The bigger concern is us not killing ourselves by nuclear missiles.
Comment icon #21 Posted by meankitty on 13 June, 2012, 11:27
Would somebody please fix the title of the article? "Andromedia" offended my eyeballs.
Comment icon #22 Posted by ZaraKitty on 13 June, 2012, 13:08
I was worried we'd all die, but in 4 billion years I can't even imagine where humanity will be.
Comment icon #23 Posted by psyche101 on 14 June, 2012, 6:56
No. This will probably not have any noticeable impact on the Earth. No. The Earth's orbit is unlikely to be affected. The new merged galaxy might have two galactic cores for a while, but that is about it. We will not get a new moon. It is incredibly unlikely that we will get another star. No. The net gravitational pull from Andromeda, while vast, will change gradually enough that it will almost certainly not disrupt our Solar system. It will just ``slide'' our Solar system smoothly and slowly to a new location within the merged galaxy. I thought that the likelihood is that our system will end ... [More]
Comment icon #24 Posted by Unknownguy on 14 June, 2012, 9:18
Imagine a planet's, stars, ect ect passing our skies, now that'll be a sight
Comment icon #25 Posted by Uncle Sam on 19 June, 2012, 17:33
It makes me sad that Earth won't be around for very long. If we as a species become space born, we could loose our place of birth and feel disconnected if it gets lost in history. All historical landmarks or information about the past would be burned up in the red giant if it engulfs Earth. There is two possibilities, Earth would move out of range of Red Giant but be stripped of atmosphere or be engulfed by the red giant. By the time the merger between two galaxies happen, Earth would either be gone or inhabitable.


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


  On the forums
Forum posts:
Forum topics:
Members:

6033751
259186
171145

 
Humanoid robot is now able to do backflips
11-18-2017
Thanks to its latest upgrade, Boston Dynamics' Atlas robot is now capable of performing gymnastics.
Fireball lights up the night sky over Finland
11-18-2017
A time-lapse camera captured the moment an intense fireball streaked across the sky over Lapland.
China to build nuclear-powered space shuttle
11-17-2017
The long-term roadmap for China's space program has been revealed by one of its primary contractors.
Skepticism surrounds head transplant success
11-17-2017
Controversial surgeon Sergio Canavero claims that he has performed the first ever human head transplant.
Other news in this category
Fireball lights up the night sky over Finland
Posted 11-18-2017 | 3 comments
A time-lapse camera captured the moment an intense fireball streaked across the sky over Lapland....
 
China to build nuclear-powered space shuttle
Posted 11-17-2017 | 5 comments
The long-term roadmap for China's space program has been revealed by one of its primary contractors....
 
New Earth-sized extrasolar planet discovered
Posted 11-16-2017 | 18 comments
Situated just 11 light years away, Ross 128 b is shaping up to be a promising place to look for life....
 
Dream Chaser completes successful glide test
Posted 11-13-2017 | 19 comments
Sierra Nevada has announced that its Dream Chaser spaceplane has completed a critical free-flight test....
 
Giant 'planet' found at the galaxy's center
Posted 11-11-2017 | 41 comments
A mysterious world 4,000 times more massive than the Earth has been found lurking 22,000 light years away....
 
China's space station could hit a major city
Posted 11-9-2017 | 35 comments
The European Space Agency has warned that there is a chance that the station could hit a populated area....
 
Enceladus ocean 'could have evolved life'
Posted 11-7-2017 | 7 comments
Scientists now believe that the ocean of Enceladus has been around long enough for life to have evolved there....
 
Proxima Centauri may have several planets
Posted 11-6-2017 | 8 comments
Observations of our closest neighboring star have revealed the possible presence of multiple planets....
 
First dog in space launched 60 years ago
Posted 11-3-2017 | 14 comments
On November 3, 1957, an unassuming canine named Laika became the first dog ever to venture in to space....
 
'Monster' planet discovered orbiting tiny star
Posted 11-1-2017 | 1 comment
The planet, which is much too big for its star, defies our current understanding of planetary formation....
 
NASA's next Mars rover will have 23 'eyes'
Posted 11-1-2017 | 5 comments
The Mars 2020 rover will be equipped with a wide assortment of cameras for surveying the Red Planet....
 

 View: More news in this category
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.7 Unexplained-Mysteries.com © 2001-2017
Privacy Policy and Disclaimer   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ