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Giant Burmese python caught In Florida

Posted on Thursday, 16 August, 2012 | Comment icon 32 comments | News tip by: BrianPotter


Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

 
The largest Burmese python ever caught in Florida has been found in Everglades National Park.

The 17ft behemoth weighed 74kg and was pregnant with a record-breaking 87 eggs. The snake's corpse will be put on display at the University of Florida for up to five years before being returned to the park. Burmese pythons have become increasingly prevalent in the region and have been blamed for the decline of several mammal species.

"It means these snakes are surviving a long time in the wild," said Kenneth Krysko of the Florida Museum of Natural History. "There's nothing stopping them, and the native wildlife are in trouble."

"The biggest Burmese python ever caught in Florida's wild has been captured in the Everglades, US scientists say."

  View: Full article

 Source: BBC News


  Discuss: View comments (32)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #23 Posted by Sundew on 18 August, 2012, 2:03
I was thinking that the State should offer a bounty for these snakes to at least control their population but that won't work. I mean how could they tell the difference between the ones killed in the wild and ones intentionally bread in captivity and killed for bounty? First, I would determine the cost of these animals in the pet trade. Then I would offer less for dead/killed animals only, but enough to encourage bounty hunters, and you could pay according to size, encouraging the eradication of adult breeding size animals. Also their skins could be sold for leather, as an additional incentive... [More]
Comment icon #24 Posted by Darkwind on 18 August, 2012, 2:13
The pet trade is what got us in this mess in the first place. Hides, if no one wants to eat them then lets make boots out of them. The problem is the everglades is a big wild place and snakes even as big as some them are they can be hard to spot. It is too, bad we are losing our wildlife to a "pet."
Comment icon #25 Posted by csspwns on 18 August, 2012, 2:52
They killed this snake, just lilke they kill all burmese pythons they find, because they are an invasive species to south Florida. South Florida has one of the most fragile ecosystems in the world, and these snakes do not belong there. Alligators are the top predator in the everglades, and now you have thrown in another top predator. Those two don't mingle well, and something has to give. I love snakes, but these snakes have no place in south Florida or anywhere else in the U.S. for that matter. Unfortunately they are here to stay, because they have already established a breeding population. S... [More]
Comment icon #26 Posted by janjeffus on 18 August, 2012, 10:59
Florida has thousands, many thousands, of these snakes. They are spreading and within 20 or 30 years they will be across the Gulf Coast. These are the offspring of exotic pets that got too big for the aquariums and the owners just turned them loose. A snake never stops growing, it will achieve growth as the habitat allows with food sources.
Comment icon #27 Posted by justcalmebubba on 18 August, 2012, 13:26
as long as the snakes dont start mix breeding i mean can you see it say like a python rattle snake ? yeah im looking for a bigger damn gun !
Comment icon #28 Posted by Sundew on 18 August, 2012, 17:19
as long as the snakes dont start mix breeding i mean can you see it say like a python rattle snake ? yeah im looking for a bigger damn gun ! You need to understand some basic genetics: There are often barriers preventing animals from breeding between different species, some physical, mostly genetic. Horses and donkeys can interbreed but 1. they are closely related and 2. the result is a sterile hybird: the mule; Very few mules have been known to be fertile or produce offspring. I supposed it is POSSIBLE that a python might breed with a boa, the two are closely related, but have important diffe... [More]
Comment icon #29 Posted by Sundew on 18 August, 2012, 17:43
The pet trade is what got us in this mess in the first place. Hides, if no one wants to eat them then lets make boots out of them. The problem is the everglades is a big wild place and snakes even as big as some them are they can be hard to spot. It is too, bad we are losing our wildlife to a "pet." Are you suggesting we ban having pets? The single biggest killer in terms of number of species killed and in total numbers killed it the Domestic Cat Felis catus, which kills hundreds of thousands of songbirds, insects, reptiles, small mammals, amphibians and anything else it can overpower every ye... [More]
Comment icon #30 Posted by msmike1 on 20 August, 2012, 13:40
so basically wat u are saying is tat if humans overpopulate the earth u should eliminate every useless human u find? You really have to know that your comment is completely off topic and makes no sense what so ever in terms of the topic at hand. Humans on earth are not an invasive species. Burmese pythons are an invasive species. Obviously you don't know what that is or you wouldn't be making comments about eradicating unwanted humans. Burmese pythons are not native to the United States. They don't live here naturally. So, when they are introduced into an area that can support them, like the t... [More]
Comment icon #31 Posted by BrianPotter on 20 August, 2012, 13:45
You really have to know that your comment is completely off topic and makes no sense what so ever in terms of the topic at hand. Humans on earth are not an invasive species. Burmese pythons are an invasive species. Obviously you don't know what that is or you wouldn't be making comments about eradicating unwanted humans. Burmese pythons are not native to the United States. They don't live here naturally. So, when they are introduced into an area that can support them, like the tropical environment of south Florida, they flourish. This being because they don't have the natural predators here th... [More]
Comment icon #32 Posted by Lady Kasey on 20 August, 2012, 18:57
With 87 eggs inside, I'm glad this one never had the chance to add to the population.


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