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Author catches glimpse of extinct thylacine


Posted on Sunday, 21 April, 2013 | Comment icon 42 comments | News tip by: xsas


Image credit: Hobart Zoo

 
Author Col Bailey maintains that he's encountered the Tasmanian tiger twice in his lifetime.

The 76-year-old has been researching the elusive carnivore for decades, which despite becoming officially extinct in 1936 continues to be sighted now and again in the Australian outback. In 1995 Bailey had been taking a leak in the bush when he encountered what he believed to be a live thylacine. "It shot out of some ferns behind me - I thought it was a cattle dog at first," he said. "But then I was face-to-face with the darn thing..."

Out next month, Bailey's book "Shadow of the Thylacine" will describe in detail the topic of the thylacine's survival as well as his travels in the outback in his attempts to catch a glimpse of one. "Expanding civilisation has pushed it right back into the bush, to places where people can't really get to," he said. "About 20 or 30 years ago it was still hanging around settled areas, but logging and tourism have pushed the frontiers back further and further."

"Mr Bailey said that the chances of a sighting a tiger had almost died out with the old bushmen who hunted and tracked the animals themselves."

  View: Full article |  Source: The Examiner

  Discuss: View comments (42)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #33 Posted by kara red on 26 April, 2013, 13:51
dad has a hippy theory that there a remote vally in tiland wich still has versions of all the extinct ausi animals
Comment icon #34 Posted by Sundew on 7 May, 2013, 13:15
I wonder what would happen if they tried to breed with dingos, both are technically dogs (never understood the tiger reference except for maybe an ancient asain tribute considering the geographical location of the country) but one is a marsupial That would be a biological impossibility, a placental mammal will not "breed" with a marsupial. And very likely the dingo and thylacine would be about as compatible as a cobra and a mongoose, being direct competitors. This also shows the problem with common names. A thylacine is not a "dog". As an example, there is a big difference between a chestnut h... [More]
Comment icon #35 Posted by Sundew on 7 May, 2013, 13:21
I hope it is true, like I hope the hearings of the Ivory Billed woodpecker in Georgia, USA are true. Believe that was Arkansas, but in any case one can hope it still lives. It is difficult to tell from the video footage. The Ivory Bill looks similar to the Pileated (which is quite common) so could be mistaken identity. The IB is also thought to possibly be alive in Cuba as well.
Comment icon #36 Posted by R4z3rsPar4d0x on 9 May, 2013, 18:13
interesting
Comment icon #37 Posted by Myles on 9 May, 2013, 21:27
interesting Very very interesting
Comment icon #38 Posted by DieChecker on 11 May, 2013, 20:14
Or maybe the reason why we can't find the Sasquatch and Oreng Penk is because they aren't real I tend to believe the Orang Pendek is very similar to the gibbon sub-species known as Saimangs. Saimang = Tailless, arboreal, black-furred, long, dense, shaggy hair, 1 m in height, and weighing up to 14 kg, long, gangling arms, face is hairless apart from a thin mustache. Native to the forests of Malaysia, Thailand, and Sumatra. Orang Pendek = Ground-dwelling, bipedal primate that is covered in short fur and stands between 80 and 150 cm tall. Mountainous forests on the island of Sumatra. Some reports... [More]
Comment icon #39 Posted by chopmo on 12 May, 2013, 3:11
Cheers DieChecker
Comment icon #40 Posted by The New Richard Nixon on 12 May, 2013, 10:16
dad has a hippy theory that there a remote vally in tiland wich still has versions of all the extinct ausi animals versions? did not know animals were machines or robots. Anyway I i highly doubt that, Australia as an island was separate from the rest of the world that allowed Marsupials to grow, Thailand does not have space for giants to move around, while Australia does
Comment icon #41 Posted by DieChecker on 12 May, 2013, 17:42
That would be a biological impossibility, a placental mammal will not "breed" with a marsupial. And very likely the dingo and thylacine would be about as compatible as a cobra and a mongoose, being direct competitors. This also shows the problem with common names. A thylacine is not a "dog". As an example, there is a big difference between a chestnut horse and a horse chestnut. This is why Linnaeus gave us the scientific binomial naming system for living things, because you might have a plant or animal with a huge natural range across multiple countries/languages and in each having a different... [More]
Comment icon #42 Posted by Dragon Lover 21 on 27 June, 2013, 20:33
I think monsterquest got everything except a photo and an actual specimen. DNA the works... I don't remember the episode that well


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