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Nature & Environment

Food shipments contaminate Antarctica

By T.K. Randall
April 18, 2011 · Comment icon 16 comments

Image Credit: Calee Allen / NOAA
Food being sent to researchers in Antarctica could be unwittingly introducing foreign species there.
Calls have been made to review biosecurity to prevent the unspoilt habitat from being contaminated by insects, worms and plant seeds being transported there on visitors' clothing and in shipments of fruit and vegetables.
Shipments of food intended for researchers working to protect one of the world's most delicate and unspoilt habitats are unwittingly posing a threat to the native animals and plants that live there.


Source: Telegraph | Comments (16)




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Comment icon #7 Posted by BigfootBuster 13 years ago
Even ones in tropical places like northern Europe There are no native roache species in northern Europe ( by northern Europe you mean Scandinavia, right?). The only reason why we get roaches is like this exampel with the Antarctic.
Comment icon #8 Posted by Mattshark 13 years ago
There are no native roache species in northern Europe ( by northern Europe you mean Scandinavia, right?). The only reason why we get roaches is like this exampel with the Antarctic. Also area's south of there, basically anywhere north of Iberia/Italy. The UK for example has 3 native cockroach species.
Comment icon #9 Posted by BigfootBuster 13 years ago
Also area's south of there, basically anywhere north of Iberia/Italy. The UK for example has 3 native cockroach species. I did some searching around and you are right. There is a lot of native cockroaches in Europe. But danielost is not completely wrong. All the cockroaches you can stumble into in Denmark(we have no native), all have very hard life conditions. The best conditions for those cockroaches, you could find in Denmark, is a tempature around 25-33 degrees. Which we "never" get in Denmark. The highest daytime average tempature we have had in the summer months were 17,7°C in 1997.
Comment icon #10 Posted by Mattshark 13 years ago
I did some searching around and you are right. There is a lot of native cockroaches in Europe. But danielost is not completely wrong. All the cockroaches you can stumble into in Denmark(we have no native), all have very hard life conditions. The best conditions for those cockroaches, you could find in Denmark, is a tempature around 25-33 degrees. Which we "never" get in Denmark. The highest daytime average tempature we have had in the summer months were 17,7°C in 1997. Like many insects there are many more tropical species definitely. Surprised southern Denmark doesn't have a few cockroach sp... [More]
Comment icon #11 Posted by danielost 13 years ago
Really? Now, all of them? Even ones in tropical places like northern Europe or New York? yes, they survive in our heated homes. after looking it up i stand almost corrected. in that not all are tropical but they still wouldnt be doing as good without our heated homes http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cockroach Cockroaches live in a wide range of environments around the world. Pest species of cockroaches adapt readily to a variety of environments, but prefer warm conditions found within buildings. Many tropical species prefer even warmer environments and do not fare well in the average household.
Comment icon #12 Posted by Mattshark 13 years ago
yes, they survive in our heated homes. after looking it up i stand almost corrected. in that not all are tropical but they still wouldnt be doing as good without our heated homes http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cockroach Cockroaches live in a wide range of environments around the world. Pest species of cockroaches adapt readily to a variety of environments, but prefer warm conditions found within buildings. Many tropical species prefer even warmer environments and do not fare well in the average household. And the native non-tropical species? As I said we have 3 native species in the UK, we are c... [More]
Comment icon #13 Posted by Miranda_310 13 years ago
Well, roaches have survived through what killed the dinosaurs, along with alligators & crocs, right? those clever mofo's will more than likely be still be on this planet even after us humans eventually perish. I dont really think roaches could pose such a threat to cause them to have all their panties in a twist and for "precautionary measures" to be made. This smells like the world governments policing every nook and corner of the world to me. That "contamination of the land and species" story is a load of bs!
Comment icon #14 Posted by Mattshark 13 years ago
Well, roaches have survived through what killed the dinosaurs, along with alligators & crocs, right? those clever mofo's will more than likely be still be on this planet even after us humans eventually perish. I dont really think roaches could pose such a threat to cause them to have all their panties in a twist and for "precautionary measures" to be made. This smells like the world governments policing every nook and corner of the world to me. That "contamination of the land and species" story is a load of bs! You don't think introducing species to an environment is a concern Wow. It is a... [More]
Comment icon #15 Posted by Abramelin 13 years ago
Those seeds brought in on Antarctica won't germinate. But who knows what will happen in the future, when the global temperature has risen to a level that creates an ice free zone in Antarctica. And what about seagulls? If they can fly from let's say the Falkland Islands to Antarctica, won't they bring in seeds??
Comment icon #16 Posted by Mattshark 13 years ago
And what about seagulls? If they can fly from let's say the Falkland Islands to Antarctica, won't they bring in seeds?? It is only such things happening as a result of human negligence that is a concern.


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