Saturday, February 4, 2023
Contact    |    RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon  
You are viewing: Home > News > World of the Bizarre > News story
Welcome Guest ( Login or Register )  
World of the Bizarre

Australia to kill farting camels ?

By T.K. Randall
July 15, 2011 · Comment icon 51 comments



Image Credit: sxc.hu
Scientists have expressed outrage over plans to kill camels in Australia due to their excess flatulence.
The latest suggested action in the war against global warming has been condemned as "false and stupid" with the animals being blamed for a problem that is believed to be man-made. "We believe that the good-hearted people and innovating nation of Australia can come up with better and smarter solutions than eradicating camels in inhumane ways," the International Society of Camelid Research and Development has said.
The scheme is the brainchild of an Adelaide-based commercial company, Northwest Carbon, a land and animal management consultancy, which proposes whacking feral camels in exchange for carbon credits.


Source: Herald Sun | Comments (51)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #42 Posted by MID 12 years ago
I agree Not a bad idea. We've got a Congress in the U.S. that needs "culling". So let's all shoot a farting camel, and while we're at it, come on over ansd start shooting some of this flatulent American beef cattle. We'll kill two carbon footprints at the same time!
Comment icon #43 Posted by Ranyhyn 12 years ago
Then there's all those rotting formerly flatulent dromedarians...contributing all the more gasses into the atmosphere. My God...all over nonsense. I hope we don't start hearing about this type of massacre really starting... There was talk of something similar in Norway. Culling like a hundred thousand reindeer for that reason. Not sure if they went through with it. Still, this is ridiculous.
Comment icon #44 Posted by Spid3rCyd3 12 years ago
Can't we just kill some of the death row inmates who are actually guilty of crimes and...I don't know, keep the camels around since they pollute far less than humans on death row?
Comment icon #45 Posted by MID 12 years ago
Can't we just kill some of the death row inmates who are actually guilty of crimes and...I don't know, keep the camels around since they pollute far less than humans on death row? Spid... I perceive that the option pool here has diminished to the undesirable, and the more undesirable! I think we allow the system to deal with death row criminals, and that we allow the camel population in Australia to be controlled reasonably....not to diminish pollution or global warming , but rather, to rid them of a pest...apparently a pest. I'm interested, not because of some dumb global warming nonsense, bu... [More]
Comment icon #46 Posted by H.H. Holmes 12 years ago
The camels were brought to Australia during the 19th century and early 20th century as animals to be used for transportation and labor. The feral camel population of Australia is estimated to number around one million individuals, which has the potential to double to two million in around nine years given the reproduction rates seen in the animals, plus the additional fact that there are no predators to limit their numbers. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, 2009Camels were imported to provide transport through inland Australia and they have since made it their domain... [More]
Comment icon #47 Posted by MID 12 years ago
The camels were brought to Australia during the 19th century and early 20th century as animals to be used for transportation and labor. The feral camel population of Australia is estimated to number around one million individuals, which has the potential to double to two million in around nine years given the reproduction rates seen in the animals, plus the additional fact that there are no predators to limit their numbers. My link Fascinating, H.H. Thanks for the input. Wow. If these creatures are problematic, what can be done? Do my suggestions make any sense? Life is in action...in the doin... [More]
Comment icon #48 Posted by portraitartist 12 years ago
There's more wind comes from fat politicians. Best to cull parliament. LOL OMG that is funny. I feel the same way about Washington sometimes...
Comment icon #49 Posted by Karlis 12 years ago
~~~ ... If these creatures are problematic, what can be done? ... If these dromedarians are a problem, what can people do? Do we shoot them all? The answer is in rounding up many/most of the camels, and herding them together with domestic cattle. That is already being done on a small scale, but to become a valuable National Asset, a lot of money and work needs to be invested. Any takers?
Comment icon #50 Posted by Doug1029 12 years ago
The camels were brought to Australia during the 19th century and early 20th century as animals to be used for transportation and labor. The feral camel population of Australia is estimated to number around one million individuals, which has the potential to double to two million in around nine years given the reproduction rates seen in the animals, plus the additional fact that there are no predators to limit their numbers. The U.S. Army tried to import camels into the US back during the Indian Wars. They hired an Arabian camel driver named Hadji Ali ("Hi Jolly"). When things didn't work out, ... [More]
Comment icon #51 Posted by MID 12 years ago
The answer is in rounding up many/most of the camels, and herding them together with domestic cattle. That is already being done on a small scale, but to become a valuable National Asset, a lot of money and work needs to be invested. Any takers? Appreciate the information,Larlis! Thanks...


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


Our new book is out now!

The Unexplained Mysteries
Book of Weird News

 AVAILABLE NOW 

Take a walk on the weird side with this compilation of some of the weirdest stories ever to grace the pages of a newspaper.

Click here to learn more

We need your help!

Support us on Patreon

 BONUS CONTENT 

For less than the cost of a cup of coffee, you can gain access to a wide range of exclusive perks including our popular 'Lost Ghost Stories' series.

Click here to learn more

 Total Posts: 7,397,883    Topics: 304,423    Members: 199,449

 Not a member yet ? Click here to join - registration is free and only takes a moment!
Recent news and articles