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Divers uncover relics of Stone Age 'Atlantis'


Posted on Tuesday, 28 January, 2014 | Comment icon 22 comments

The discovery was made in the Baltic Sea. Image Credit: CC BY-SA 2.0 Harald Hoyer
Stone Age artifacts left behind by Swedish nomads have been unearthed on the floor of the Baltic Sea.
Divers exploring the bay of Hanö off the coast of Sweden have uncovered a treasure trove of artifacts dating back more than 11,000 years. Made from both stone and bone fragments, the items exhibit impressive levels of preservation thanks to the lack of oxygen and abundance of peat-based sediment on the ocean floor.
"What we have here is maybe one of the oldest settlements from the first more permanent sites in Scania and in Sweden full stop," said Professor Björn Nilsson who lead the project. Among the finds was a harpoon carved from animal bone, flint tools, rope, horns and other items that had once been discarded in to the water.

"Around 11,000 years ago there was a build up in the area, a lagoon or sorts... and all the tree and bone pieces are preserved in it," said Nilsson. "If the settlement was on dry land we would only have the stone-based things, nothing organic."

Source: Thelocal.se | Comments (22)

Tags: Baltic, Sweden, Stone Age

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #13 Posted by QuiteContrary on 29 January, 2014, 10:23
Very cool! Nilsson admitted that "lousy Swedish tabloids" had blown the story out of the water by labelling the find "Sweden's Atlantis", even though the remnants never belonged to an actual village. The people were all nomadic at the time, he explained, so there was no village. Imagine that! I'm shocked.
Comment icon #14 Posted by Ryinrea on 29 January, 2014, 12:11
Who else hates when they always use the "Atlantis" angle? Good gads! Can't we just be in awe of a new discovery without comparing it to a fictional island? I hate that too it's aynoing. I am excited by this find even thought they were probaly nomadic tribes in the area at that time. Stone Age people were nomadic not city dwellers like us as such we shouldn't say they were city dwellers just saying. Althought I like the story of Alantis
Comment icon #15 Posted by jaylemurph on 30 January, 2014, 2:41
Contemporary? Well, John V. Luce only died three years ago and he was an academic proponent of the Thera-Cretan (Minoan) hypothesis. His book is what introduced me to Atlantis years back, although I don't myself support the Minoan theory. I'm not sure though what the other poster above means by "the quote taken out of context from a non-historian". Luce was a prominent historian and classics professor at Dublin University. Luce was a classicist, /not/ an historian. Mainly, it's the classicists themselves who go out of their way to make the distinction: they generally seem dead set on retaining... [More]
Comment icon #16 Posted by kmt_sesh on 30 January, 2014, 3:12
Contemporary? Well, John V. Luce only died three years ago and he was an academic proponent of the Thera-Cretan (Minoan) hypothesis. His book is what introduced me to Atlantis years back, although I don't myself support the Minoan theory. I'm not sure though what the other poster above means by "the quote taken out of context from a non-historian". Luce was a prominent historian and classics professor at Dublin University. Naddaf (1994) summarizes: "the vast majority of classical scholars take the story to be what Plato explicitly denies it to be: invented myth (the serious exceptions to this ... [More]
Comment icon #17 Posted by OliverDSmith on 30 January, 2014, 4:48
I'm not familiar with Luce so I looked into him, and he seems like the real deal—a well-published classicist. I'll depart from my esteemed colleague jaylemurph (who knows his stuff, trust me) in saying that a professionally educated classicist is wellI equipped to dissect Plato's story, due to Plato himself, his motives behind crafting the story, and the events of Plato's own time. From my own experience with jaylemurph I can say he's more familiar with classicist methodology than I am, but I'm willing to allow Luce as a credible source. Also Desmond Lee, but Luce is better known. I may have m... [More]
Comment icon #18 Posted by OliverDSmith on 30 January, 2014, 5:21
Luce was a classicist, /not/ an historian. Mainly, it's the classicists themselves who go out of their way to make the distinction: they generally seem dead set on retaining archaic and exclusivising critical methods (like using German for commentaries -- although they're relenting on this -- and refusing to translate quotations in their articles into vernacular) and apparatus (You need guide books just to crack the code of their journal title references or the give name of texts. I spent a merry hour trying to figure what the hell the Eytm. Gud. was in December), so historians are happy to le... [More]
Comment icon #19 Posted by jaylemurph on 30 January, 2014, 5:26
I'm not familiar with Luce so I looked into him, and he seems like the real deal—a well-published classicist. I'll depart from my esteemed colleague jaylemurph (who knows his stuff, trust me) in saying that a professionally educated classicist is wellI equipped to dissect Plato's story, due to Plato himself, his motives behind crafting the story, and the events of Plato's own time. From my own experience with jaylemurph I can say he's more familiar with classicist methodology than I am, but I'm willing to allow Luce as a credible source. I certainly wouldn't go that far. I would say a Classici... [More]
Comment icon #20 Posted by jaylemurph on 30 January, 2014, 5:33
Well Atlantis falls under the study of classical civilization. Quoting a classicist is clearly more relevant than a general historian. There are prominent classicists who argue or have argued (in the case of Luce) that Atlantis was a real place. That was the only point I made. These people cannot be dismissed easily. The case for a historical Atlantis is actually stronger than the fiction view when you consider Solon and Critias considered it to be "true history" which Socrates does not even question in the dialogues. Luce (1978) also argues Plato himself believed Atlantis was real, not imagin... [More]
Comment icon #21 Posted by kmt_sesh on 31 January, 2014, 4:01
I certainly wouldn't go that far. I would say a Classicist could well dissect the story as is, i. e., almost solely within the works of Plato. A Classicist would have the necessary profound knowledge of language and culture to discuss that story as it relates to Greco-Roman society. However, outside of the story in Plato, as a historical reality, the Atlantean civilization, if it existed at all, would be by definition out of the remit of a post-Winckelmann Classical scholar -- i. e., not a Greco-Roman one. Indeed, as it has not left one letter of writing, it would be out of the remit of the hi... [More]
Comment icon #22 Posted by Harte on 1 February, 2014, 10:57
Also, to suggest Plato thought it to be a literally real place, you have to argue against his own statements -- do ask Harte about those -- and the logic of the extended metaphor present in the dialogues where Atlantis is presented. But having participated in this argument (literally) more times than I can remember, I have no interest in doing so again. --Jaylemurph "Ask Harte...?" Oh, sure. Lay it on me. I suggest the search function. I'm quite tired of this line of "reasoning" myself. If you get to use that excuse, so do I. Harte


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