Wednesday, January 19, 2022
Contact    |    RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon  
You are viewing: Home > News > Palaeontology > News story
Welcome Guest ( Login or Register )  

Did you know that you can now support us on Patreon ?

You can subscribe for less than the cost of a cup of coffee - and we'll even throw in a range of exclusive perks as a way to say thank you.
Palaeontology

Tibetans inherited high-altitude genes

July 5, 2014 | Comment icon 11 comments



A farmer tends to his goats in the mountains. Image Credit: CC BY-SA 3.0 Antoine Taveneaux
Tibetans are believed to have obtained their resilience to high altitudes from the Denisovan people.
Unacclimatized visitors to the high altitude Tibetan plateau tend to experience a host of altitude sickness related symptoms within a very short time, but for the local people who live there this otherwise inhospitable environment seems to pose little difficulty.

The origins of the adaptations that enable the Tibetans to thrive in the mountainous regions of their homeland are not entirely understood, but now a new study has revealed that these traits may have been inherited long ago from an extinct species of human.
Scientists believe that they have identified a distinct genetic connection between the modern people of Tibet and the extinct Denisovan people who had themselves only recently been discovered. The high altitude genes of the modern Tibetans are likely to have been passed down from the Denisovans following inter-species relationships in the distant past.

The find represents the first time that a gene from an extinct human species has been conclusively determined to have enabled modern humans to adapt to a hostile environment.

Source: LA Times | Comments (11)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #2 Posted by Eldorado 8 years ago
Levi 1, Darwin 0 My bad, I thought they meant jeans.
Comment icon #3 Posted by John Wesley Boyd 8 years ago
They're not any more acclimatized than the Quechua and the Aymara of the Andes. They just adapted after generations of living at high altitude.
Comment icon #4 Posted by plaguedmedusa 8 years ago
No way would I go there, I have claustrophobia so bad that with less oxygen than Im used to having, Ill probably have a panic attack and die lol.
Comment icon #5 Posted by MyOtherAccount 8 years ago
I have genes that give me a predisposition to wanting to be high, too!
Comment icon #6 Posted by Zerocoder 8 years ago
this forum is indeed to sarcastic. OT: Seems interesting.
Comment icon #7 Posted by Silent Trinity 8 years ago
Great article! Seems that evidence of a great range of adaptation and bio-diversity if you like, exists on our humble little world. That is evolution for you, we adapt, we overcome, we survive.
Comment icon #8 Posted by toyomotor 8 years ago
They're not any more acclimatized than the Quechua and the Aymara of the Andes. They just adapted after generations of living at high altitude. But did they? If Tibetan people born with a Denisovan gene are better able to live and work in high altitudes, why could it not be that people of the Andes have the same Denisovan gene? Why could not people who live in other high altitude locations share the same gene. I don't think scientists have done enough yet to be able to rule my theory out.
Comment icon #9 Posted by MyOtherAccount 8 years ago
Darwin 1, God 0. Levi 1, Darwin 0 Darwin 1, God 1 The way Darwin saw it.
Comment icon #10 Posted by shrooma 8 years ago
They adapted after generations of living at high altitude. . ....which is how evolution works.... .
Comment icon #11 Posted by shrooma 8 years ago
Darwin 1, God 1 The way Darwin saw it. . because he was a priest. he suffered attacks of conscience over his theory, to the point of witholding publication, and then only so Alfred Wallace didn't beat him to it.... .


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


 Total Posts: 7,212,597    Topics: 295,826    Members: 195,245

 Not a member yet ? Click here to join - registration is free and only takes a moment!
Recent news and articles