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Scientist has 'solved' the Bermuda Triangle


Posted on Saturday, 22 July, 2017 | Comment icon 18 comments

Is there really a mystery left to solve ? Image Credit: CC BY-SA 4.0 Brocken Inaglory
Dr Karl Kruszelnicki maintains that the answer to the mystery lies in little more than basic human error.
There are few mysteries as enduring and as well known as the Bermuda Triangle - an expanse of ocean in the North Atlantic that spans the area between Florida, Bermuda and Puerto Rico.

Over the years the region has become synonymous with the unexplained disappearances of ships and airplanes - often with no trace of them or their crews ever being found.

But now, Australian Scientist Dr Karl Kruszelnicki has put forward what is perhaps the most simple of all explanations for the mystery by suggesting that the disappearances can all be attributed to, not an anomalous phenomenon, but good old fashioned human error.

"According to Lloyds of London and the US coast guard, the number of planes that go missing in the Bermuda Triangle is the same as anywhere in the world on a percentage basis," he said.

"It is close to the equator, near a wealthy part of the world, America, therefore you have a lot of traffic."

It is certainly true that at least some of the disappearances can be attributed to human error.

The first big mystery of the Bermuda Triangle was that of Flight 19 - a routine training mission consisting of five airplanes that left Fort Lauderdale in Florida on December 5, 1945.

All five of the aircraft disappeared completely and no sign of any wreckage was ever found.

To make matters worse, a PBM-Mariner seaplane, which had been sent on a search-and-rescue mission to locate the other five planes, also disappeared along with its 13-man crew.

But not all was as it seemed, as in later years the truth of what took place during these incidents eventually presented itself. As it turned out, Flight 19 had become lost due to a navigational error and ended up so far out to sea that the planes ran out of fuel before they could reach land.

The PBM-Mariner seaplane that went to look for them was thought to have exploded in mid-air.

Source: New Zealand Herald | Comments (18)

Tags: Bermuda Triangle

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #9 Posted by Boozemonkey on 22 July, 2017, 20:29
I think I'll stick with Dairylee triangles! ... But part of me wishes for the mystery of Bermuda.
Comment icon #10 Posted by South Alabam on 23 July, 2017, 0:15
Hypothesis maybe, not a proven fact.
Comment icon #11 Posted by Krater on 23 July, 2017, 6:58
The area does not have a higher incidence of missing vessels or aircraft. FACT. The area has higher traffic than, say, the middleof the Atlantic Ocean. FACT. Try again, tinfoil hat person.
Comment icon #12 Posted by Krater on 23 July, 2017, 7:06
Yes, they would for Top Secret Project Mogul (not just a weather balloon). If I were you, I'd be more concerned about that receiver the CIA implanted in your molar for Project Manchurian Candidate. I hear that you can block the signal by wrapping your head in a wet towel...or by wearing...wait for it...a tinfoil hat!
Comment icon #13 Posted by stereologist on 23 July, 2017, 12:30
There are more planes lost over the continental US and never found than over the Bermuda triangle. The stories of the Bermuda triangle have been greatly altered by the books to make simple disappearances look like mysteries. If you believe in the books such as Berlitz's then you have been duped by his fiction.
Comment icon #14 Posted by South Alabam on 23 July, 2017, 13:13
Australian scientistDr Karl Kruszelnicki says human error is behind the mystery He points to historic example, where bad weather was most likely involved US Coast Guard and NOAA have said there's no evidence of unusual activity They say percent of disappearances matches that of other well-traveled areas I was just going off what the article has written. And I agree with what he has written to a certain extent, however that is why I said Hypothesis maybe, not a proven fact. I was in no way saying the Bermuda triangle mystery was still valid.
Comment icon #15 Posted by UFOwatcher on 23 July, 2017, 15:21
Humph! Next thing ya know the Aussies will be saying we have no Bigfoot.
Comment icon #16 Posted by Codenwarra on 24 July, 2017, 7:04
Dr Karl is being overly circumspect. He says "mistakes", it is quite clear that many of the claims of lossesinvolve lies about when and wherethey actuallyhappened.
Comment icon #17 Posted by South Alabam on 24 July, 2017, 13:00
That is why I said Hypothesis. Some of the missing vessels could have been piracy and the vessel stolen or sunk or whatever. He just cannot make a claim that 100% of the losses was due to human error.
Comment icon #18 Posted by seanjo on 24 July, 2017, 17:08
I've been saying this for years!


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