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Rare footage shows 'eerie' arctic jellyfish


Posted on Thursday, 26 October, 2017 | Comment icon 3 comments

The jellyfish were filmed during the winter. Image Credit: YouTube / Earth Institute / Columbia University
Scientists have captured footage of arctic jellyfish slithering along the bottom of the Chukchi Sea.
The recordings were made during the Arctic winter using a small robotic submarine capable of descending in to the freezing waters off the coast of Alaska.

To get the device to this location, marine biologist Andy Juhl and his colleagues from Columbia University's Earth Institute rode out using snowmobiles and drilled several holes in the ice.

Finding arctic jellyfish at such a cold time of the year came as something of a surprise because this particular species, which is known as Chrysaora melanaster or 'northern sea nettle', was previously thought to be too fragile to survive the winter months in its adult form.

It is now thought that the colder temperatures may actually be beneficial to the jellyfish as the frozen surface helps to protect them from turbulent seas and the cold water lowers their metabolism.

"Life under sea ice is like living in a refrigerator," said Juhl. "Everything slows down."


Source: Gizmodo | Comments (3)

Tags: Arctic Jellyfish

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by paperdyer on 26 October, 2017, 12:23
Eerie is right! Looks like "The Blob" has evolved from it's 60+ year exile in the Arctic.
Comment icon #2 Posted by paperdyer on 26 October, 2017, 19:56
Maybe the remake, not the original. The original was James Arness in a plant creature outfit of some sort.
Comment icon #3 Posted by Sundew on 7 November, 2017, 2:08
Looks to me like the Jellyfish is being pushed against the bottom by a current and the last individual shown has been shredded pretty badly as a result. Despite being venomous, these animals are extremely fragile, they had to design special aquariums just to display them, ones where the current keeps them from contacting the glass. They are something like 98% water and don't play well with sand and rocks.


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