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Natural World

80-mile-wide 'storm' is swarm of ladybugs

June 9, 2019 | Comment icon 4 comments



The ladybugs spent the winter up in the mountains. Image Credit: CC BY 2.0 Gabriel Gonzalez
A storm that appeared on National Weather Service radar recently turned out to be something else entirely.
The vast swarm of insects, which covered a 6,400-square-mile region of Southern California, showed up on June 4th at an altitude of up to 9,000ft.

"The size of that is bewildering," said ladybug expert Tim Kring from Virginia Tech University.

It is believed that the ladybugs had spent the winter engaged in a form of hibernation up in California's Sierra Nevada mountains before waking up to find food as the warmer weather settled in.
The National Weather Service was able to tell the swarm apart from a meteorological event because the skies over the region were clear at the time and there was no rain.

A weather spotter also observed the cloud traveling towards the San Diego area.

These particular insects, which are known as convergent lady beetles, will ultimately lay their eggs and die after they have eaten enough food and the next generation will begin the cycle anew.



Source: Mashable | Comments (4)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Iilaa'mpuul'xem 3 years ago
WOW... that's incredible.
Comment icon #2 Posted by ParanormalMike666 3 years ago
Ick
Comment icon #3 Posted by Seti42 3 years ago
It was bigfoot. Wake up, sheeple!
Comment icon #4 Posted by Berwen 3 years ago
Awesome, I hope they don't try to destroy any of them because they are most beneficial. No more aphids. 


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