Thursday, January 28, 2021
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help    |   Cookie Policy    |   Privacy Policy    RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in

Largest explosion since the Big Bang detected


Posted on Friday, 28 February, 2020 | Comment icon 8 comments

Image Credit: XMM / CHANDRA / GMRT / 2MASS / NASA
Scientists have spotted an explosion five times greater than anything seen since the birth of the universe.
Discovered by a team of US and Australian astronomers, this colossal explosion was produced by a burst of energy from a supermassive black hole in a galaxy cluster 390 million light years away.

It released the same amount of energy as the annual output of 10^20 suns (that's 1 with 20 zeroes), however the event itself seemed to have occurred over the course of hundreds of millions of years.

"You could fit 15 Milky Way galaxies in a row into the crater this eruption punched into the cluster's [plasma]," said Simona Giacintucci from the US Naval Research Laboratory.
Evidence of the event was picked up by several major telescopes including NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and ESA's XMM-Newton X-ray telescope.

Aside from the Big Bang, which brought the universe itself into existence, this is by far the largest explosion ever observed - five times larger than anything else seen before.

"We've seen outbursts in the centers of galaxies before but this one is really, really massive... and we don't know why it's so big," said Curtin University's Melanie Johnston-Hollitt.

Source: Physicsworld.com | Comments (8)


Tags: Galaxy, Black Hole


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Damien99 on 29 February, 2020, 13:15
Hi guys hope everyone is doing well. i had some questions about this explosion? https://www.google.ca/amp/s/www.space.com/amp/biggest-cosmic-explosion-universe-discovery.html   1. If the explosion was that big and took up so much space does that mean all the planets and stars in the vicinity of the burst were destroyed? 2. The article mentions that the explosion took place over millions of years but has stopped now, how do they know it stopped. Can they still see that area? 3. how long will it take for the shockwave from this event to reach us here on earth. 4. can the effects of this reach is... [More]
Comment icon #2 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 29 February, 2020, 14:53
Yes. What is being observed is a cavity,  an area devoid stars and planets. How do you know if a bomb has stopped exploding? Because you don't see an explosion. Same thing here. They are observing the after effects of an explosion.  The shockwave won't reach us here, the explosion was hundreds of millions of light years away. Intergalactic space is essentially a vacuum, so there is nothing for a shock wave to travel through... certainly not over those distances.  The effects of this will never reach us.
Comment icon #3 Posted by Damien99 on 29 February, 2020, 15:00
So the shockwave is not expanding in that region still destroying things in its path?
Comment icon #4 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 29 February, 2020, 15:25
I mentioned INTERGALACTIC space. That is the space between galaxies. The shock wave passes through INTERSTELLAR space, that is the space between the stars within a galaxy. This event is not in our galaxy, it is in a galaxy hundreds of millions of light years away. What's more, because we are observing an event in a galaxy hundreds of millions of light years away we are observing an event that occurred hundreds of millions of years ago, You don't seem to have a grasp of how big space is. Light travels at a speed of around 300,000 kilometres per second (186,282 miles per second). A light year is... [More]
Comment icon #5 Posted by Damien99 on 29 February, 2020, 15:33
I understand that, but my question was you had said the explosion is done cause they see the area but in that specific area Is the  shockwave expanding in that region still destroying things in its path?   so they didn’t see the actual explosion the . Is there still stats and galaxies around there?
Comment icon #6 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 29 February, 2020, 15:43
Read the first line of the article until you understand it and then try thinking for yourself.
Comment icon #7 Posted by Damien99 on 29 February, 2020, 15:50
This one  Astronomers have spotted a cosmic blast that dwarfs all others. the article you posted or I did 
Comment icon #8 Posted by Damien99 on 29 February, 2020, 16:51
Also is there still other stars and galaxies in that area of the universe that we see 


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


  On the forums
The bizarre 'UFO patents' of Dr Salvatore Pais
1-27-2021
Over the years, the US Navy has invested large sums into the development of several 'out there' technologies.
Has the Nazca Lines mystery been solved ?
1-27-2021
A new archaeological study has reportedly discovered the true purpose of the enigmatic Peruvian geoglyphs.
The peculiar history of cheese and witchcraft
1-26-2021
Throughout the ages, cheese has been perceived to possess all manner of strange and magical properties.
Mysteries revisited: the body on Killhope Moor
1-26-2021
The mystery of a body found in a coffin on a moor 100 years ago continues to endure even to this day.
Stories & Experiences
The voice of something not human
11-17-2020 | Baldwin Hills, Los Angeles
 
Shadow figure demon ?
11-14-2020 | USA
 
Ghost following me
9-18-2020 | Iowa
 
Mysterious glowing cube
8-23-2020 | Alabama
 
Black blob in my room/bed
7-23-2020 | Powell,TN U.S.
 
Transparent levitating ball
7-14-2020 | Santa Rosa, California
 
 
 
Grim reaper-like visitation
6-16-2020 | Canada
 
My monster catfish story
6-15-2020 | Dallas texas
 

         More stories | Send us your story
Featured Videos
Gallery icon 
NASA studies underwater 'white smoker' vents
Posted 4-17-2020 | 3 comments
Hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor can teach us about possible habitats on other worlds.
 
10 strange things about our solar system
Posted 3-17-2020 | 0 comments
A look at some of the most mysterious things about our solar system.
 
Lizzie - Scotland's other loch monster
Posted 3-8-2020 | 0 comments
Amelia Dimoldenberg investigates the Loch Ness Monster's neighbor.
 
 View: More videos
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.712 Unexplained-Mysteries.com (c) 2001-2021
Terms   |   Privacy Policy   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ