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Thylacine collection goes on display

Posted on Monday, 7 March, 2011 | Comment icon 18 comments | News tip by: Still Waters


Image credit: Hobart Zoo

 
The largest private collection of Tasmanian tiger artefacts in the world has gone on display.

The permanent exhibition is showing in the Wilderness Gallery at Tasmania's Cradle Mountain and helps shed light on both how the Thylacine lived and how it was driven to extinction in the early 20th century.

"The thylacine has become an Australian icon since its extinction in the early 20th century at the hands of Tasmanian hunters."

  View: Full article

 Source: Australian Geographic


  Discuss: View comments (18)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #9 Posted by xCrimsonx on 9 March, 2011, 23:43
Tasmanian Tigers brought to life? Where now?
Comment icon #10 Posted by dreaming on 10 March, 2011, 3:19
i demand cloned dinosaurs NOW
Comment icon #11 Posted by UFO_Monster on 10 March, 2011, 3:21
The titles of this thread and the article are deceiving.
Comment icon #12 Posted by Somerset Pierce on 10 March, 2011, 4:07
I have a hard time understanding why people want to clone this animal out of extinction. We should learn from our mistakes, not erase them.
Comment icon #13 Posted by Kyouka on 11 March, 2011, 12:05
I have a hard time understanding why people want to clone this animal out of extinction. We should learn from our mistakes, not erase them. Cloning Tasmanian Tigers out of extinction would not erase anything. They would still be basically extinct except for in captivity, and to have a good breeding population we'd have to take great pangs to set up reserves and all of that. We can learn from our mistakes without being defeatist about it and wanting to keep the consequences permanent.
Comment icon #14 Posted by BaneSilvermoon on 11 May, 2011, 20:41
Cloning Tasmanian Tigers out of extinction would not erase anything. They would still be basically extinct except for in captivity, and to have a good breeding population we'd have to take great pangs to set up reserves and all of that. We can learn from our mistakes without being defeatist about it and wanting to keep the consequences permanent. Merriam-Websters Learner's Dictionary cap·tiv·i·ty /kæp?t?v?ti/ noun [noncount] : the state of being kept in a place (such as a prison or a cage) and not being able to leave or be free : the state or condition of being captive cap·tive /?kæpt?v/ adjec... [More]
Comment icon #15 Posted by TheFlyingDutchman on 12 May, 2011, 0:09
Awwww.... I thought this would be a thread about the thylocenes being cloned and grown into real animals. :-( I think the title is a little misleading. :-( Same, I am disapoint.
Comment icon #16 Posted by The Metal on 12 May, 2011, 1:17
This has to be at least the third time i've seen a title about bringing thylacines back and they never deliver!. as for the debate over whether we should bring extinct creatures beck to life i say do it! No creature should be made to exist purely for that purpose. Cloned or not. you make it sound like they would be kept in poor conditions, anyone with the funding and the means to clone an extinct animal back into existence is not going to go through the effort just to see it rot in a cage. would you still argue the same point if the animals were kept in a three acre bio dome perfectly simulati... [More]
Comment icon #17 Posted by BaneSilvermoon on 12 May, 2011, 20:52
This has to be at least the third time i've seen a title about bringing thylacines back and they never deliver!. as for the debate over whether we should bring extinct creatures beck to life i say do it! you make it sound like they would be kept in poor conditions, anyone with the funding and the means to clone an extinct animal back into existence is not going to go through the effort just to see it rot in a cage. would you still argue the same point if the animals were kept in a three acre bio dome perfectly simulating their natural habbit, with limited contact to humans and live prey to hun... [More]
Comment icon #18 Posted by Soul Kitchen on 13 May, 2011, 1:56
What does it mean for the planet? Species have come and gone for millennia, and it's usually been that the planet is what screwed them over! When humans take far more than they need, they make corpulent corpses that are best put in the ground so that the planet can reclaim what had been taken. "The planet" wants for nothing. At a much different rate, from other causes. Just think about it... An species fading from existence as a result of natural selection vs. a species being avidly hunted be humans. Which one will go faster?


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