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Phobos-Grunt spacecraft to crash

Posted on Sunday, 18 December, 2011 | Comment icon 20 comments


Image credit: Roscosmos

 
The failed Russian Mars probe is due to crash back down to Earth as early as January next year.

The probe represented Russia's latest effort to reach Mars with a mission that was to retrieve a sample from the Red Planet's moon Phobos and return it to the Earth, however technical failures at launch meant that the spacecraft ended up trapped in Earth's orbit. The 13.2 tonne probe will crashland at some time between January 6th and January 19th with 11 tonnes of toxic rocket fuel and 10 tonnes of radioactive materials on board.

"A Russian space probe weighing almost as much as two double-decker buses is set to come crashing back to Earth in the New Year."

  View: Full article

 Source: Telegraph


  Discuss: View comments (20)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #11 Posted by Uncle Sam on 2 January, 2012, 15:12
The Chinese shot down one of their own satellites in 2010 I think, so this should be an easy target. Blowing up the satelite without control will contribute snificantly to the space junk orbiting Earth, causing more hazard for manned missions and international space station.
Comment icon #12 Posted by badeskov on 2 January, 2012, 21:08
The Chinese shot down one of their own satellites in 2010 I think, so this should be an easy target. That was in 2007 they pulled that stunt. But they didn't shoot down the satellite, they blew it up. You can't shoot something that is in space, you can only blow it up. The difference is huge. They managed to create a huge debris field, which i still circling around in orbit, posing as a danger to other vehicles in space. Cheers, Badeskov
Comment icon #13 Posted by and then on 11 January, 2012, 4:53
That was in 2007 they pulled that stunt. But they didn't shoot down the satellite, they blew it up. You can't shoot something that is in space, you can only blow it up. The difference is huge. They managed to create a huge debris field, which i still circling around in orbit, posing as a danger to other vehicles in space. Cheers, Badeskov My mistake I wonder if there is any case law on torts related to space junk.
Comment icon #14 Posted by badeskov on 12 January, 2012, 2:13
My mistake I wonder if there is any case law on torts related to space junk. No worries I doubt there is any case law, but I could obviously be wrong. Even if that was the case, I doubt it would be possible to pry anything out of the Chinese or the Russians in a civilian court case, although they might pay restitution if approached on a Government level (pure speculation on my behalf - I honestly have no idea of what I speak ) Cheers, Badeskov
Comment icon #15 Posted by Harrigan on 14 January, 2012, 4:59
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-16491457 Sunday is the day apparently. 200kg may not be much but is there a chance it doesn't break up? That 200kg will make a pretty big bang on impact!
Comment icon #16 Posted by badeskov on 14 January, 2012, 10:52
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-16491457 Sunday is the day apparently. 200kg may not be much but is there a chance it doesn't break up? That 200kg will make a pretty big bang on impact! Indeed. One of the risks of sending stuff into space, though. Cheers, Badeskov
Comment icon #17 Posted by glorybebe on 15 January, 2012, 18:07
....It's on an orbit that doesn't go around the equator," he said. "Instead it's on an angle. Going around the earth, up and down. So it pretty well covers all of the populated areas of the world."The unmanned probe is one of the heaviest and most toxic space derelicts ever to crash to Earth, but space officials and experts say the risks are minimal as its orbit is mostly over water and most of the probe's structure will burn up in the atmosphere anyway. "The resulting risk isn't significant," said Prof. Heiner Klinkrad, head of the European Space Agency's Space Debris Office that is monitorin... [More]
Comment icon #18 Posted by Mentalcase on 15 January, 2012, 18:32
RUN FOR THE HILLS!!!!!
Comment icon #19 Posted by glorybebe on 15 January, 2012, 18:49
RUN FOR THE HILLS!!!!! LOL, let's hope it will not come to that
Comment icon #20 Posted by Eldorado on 15 January, 2012, 20:06
If I ran to the hills it would probably crash into those hills, such is my luck lately.


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