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New 'sea monster' could rewrite evolution


Posted on Thursday, 16 May, 2013 | Comment icon 12 comments | News tip by: Still Waters


Image credit: CC 3.0 Nobu Tamura

 
The fossil remains of a new species of dolphin-like Cretaceous era sea reptile have been discovered.

The 10ft Malawania anachronus is a particularly important discovery because ichthyosaurs were believed to have disappeared during the Jurassic era, some 66 million years before this species existed. The discrepancy is so significant in fact that palaeontologists are divided on whether the find will rewrite the history books or if it is simply a case of misidentification.

Study leader Valentin Fischer has described the species as "something that shouldn't be there, but it is." Even the name Malawania anachronus means "out-of-time swimmer" in Kurdish and Greek. "This 'living fossil' of its time demonstrates the existence of a lineage that we had never even imagined," said Fischer.

"The scientists don't know how M. anachronus managed to keep the same body shape through the millennia—a "very rare feat" among marine reptiles, which tend to evolve quickly in response to changing ocean conditions."

  View: Full article |  Source: National Geographic

  Discuss: View comments (12)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #3 Posted by Simbi Laveau on 15 May, 2013, 19:32
Prehistoric waters were like Texas is today ,THEY DO EVERYTHING BIGGER !
Comment icon #4 Posted by YukiEsmaElite0 on 16 May, 2013, 12:32
Will this prove to the world that evolution is the only correct theory? Probally not...
Comment icon #5 Posted by aquatus1 on 16 May, 2013, 13:04
I couldn't find the slightest trace of who said anything about this re-writing evolution (except for National Geographic). The closest the study came to was that this may require a revision of the ichysomethingsomething timeline.
Comment icon #6 Posted by paperdyer on 16 May, 2013, 13:39
I couldn't find the slightest trace of who said anything about this re-writing evolution (except for National Geographic). The closest the study came to was that this may require a revision of the ichysomethingsomething timeline. But would have been as eager to read the article if it hadn't had "rewrite" in the title?
Comment icon #7 Posted by mfrmboy on 16 May, 2013, 13:44
Dang !! Now the poor mules have nothing to step on........
Comment icon #8 Posted by ShadowOfMothman on 16 May, 2013, 15:43
I couldn't find the slightest trace of who said anything about this re-writing evolution (except for National Geographic). The closest the study came to was that this may require a revision of the ichysomethingsomething timeline. Actually, it could re-write the evolutionary history of Ichthyosauria. Think of all the possible forms they could have evolved in during those 66 million years!
Comment icon #9 Posted by Auldaney on 16 May, 2013, 17:03
Evolutionists claimed Ichthosaurs became extinct in the Jurassic, now they found one in the Cretaceous, 66 million years later according to evolutionists. The newfound Ichthosaur—and controversial—Malawania anachronus was a ten-foot (three-meter) long Ichthyosaur, a group of dolphin-like creatures that could grow to 65 feet (20 meters) in length. Of course they gave it a different name so it would not be recognized as identical to the Jurassic Ichthyosaur, proving it did not evolve for 66 million years! Evolutionists are shocked because marine reptiles evolve rapidly! This is the same thing th... [More]
Comment icon #10 Posted by aquatus1 on 17 May, 2013, 0:05
Actually, it could re-write the evolutionary history of Ichthyosauria. Think of all the possible forms they could have evolved in during those 66 million years! Which is a rather creative use by the article of a study which is actually about how little the fishie evolved in those 66 million years! The newfound Ichthosaur—and controversial—Malawania anachronus was a ten-foot (three-meter) long Ichthyosaur, a group of dolphin-like creatures that could grow to 65 feet (20 meters) in length. Of course they gave it a different name so it would not be recognized as identical to the Jurassic Ichthyos... [More]
Comment icon #11 Posted by justcalmebubba on 17 May, 2013, 4:28
looks like a swordfish but then i dont know dinos from any time period wait i know my x mother in law does she count as a dino?
Comment icon #12 Posted by ShadowOfMothman on 17 May, 2013, 16:25
The newfound Ichthosaur—and controversial—Malawania anachronus was a ten-foot (three-meter) long Ichthyosaur, a group of dolphin-like creatures that could grow to 65 feet (20 meters) in length. The anatomy of ichthyosaurs was ideal to hunt fast moving prey and escape other, larger species of marine reptiles, such as pliosaurs(a group of reptiles that used their four flippers to move around, and not their tail like the ichtyosaurs, a characteristic that offered great maneuverability but not as much speed as the fish-like tail o the icthyosaurs). So, as you can see, these creatures were so succe... [More]


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