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Search is on for 'world's loneliest whale'


Posted on Friday, 19 July, 2013 | Comment icon 14 comments | News tip by: Still Waters


Image credit: Whit Welles

 
A new documentary will attempt to track down a whale communicating at an anomalous frequency.

While most whales communicate at a frequency of between 17 and 18 Hertz, this particular specimen caught the attention of researchers because it was communicating at 52 Hertz. Whether due to a malformation or otherwise, this anomalous frequency means that the whale's calls will never be picked up by other whales, earning it the nickname 'world's loneliest whale'.

"We donít know what species it is," said research assistant Mary Ann Daher. "We donít know if it has a malformation. Obviously, itís healthy. Itís been alive all these years. Is he alone? I donít know. People like to imagine this creature just out there swimming by his lonesome, just singing away and nobodyís listening. But I canít say that."

"A team of documentary makers are heading to the North Pacific to try and find a creature dubbed "the world's loneliest whale"."

  View: Full article |  Source: Herald Sun

  Discuss: View comments (14)

   


 
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Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #5 Posted by shrooma on 19 July, 2013, 13:14
QUOTE- "While most whales communicate at a frequency of between 17 and 18 Hertz, this particular specimen caught the attention of researchers because it was communicating at 52 Hertz. Whether due to a malformation or otherwise, this anomalous frequency means that the whale's calls will never be picked up by other whales, earning it the nickname 'world's loneliest whale'. Is he alone? I donít know. People like to imagine this creature just out there swimming by his lonesome, just singing away and nobodyís listening. But I canít say that." . how do we know it can't be heard? just because it's si... [More]
Comment icon #6 Posted by pallidin on 19 July, 2013, 15:52
I would agree with shrooma. This is far from definitive(with respect to no other whales hearing that frequency)
Comment icon #7 Posted by The New Richard Nixon on 19 July, 2013, 15:58
Isn't there a picture of him or her? recently? near Vancouver? or Seattle?
Comment icon #8 Posted by shrooma on 19 July, 2013, 17:11
found this article about the same story- . http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1361873/Everybody-hertz-The-heartbroken-whale-sings-low-hear.html . and BOY have the daily mail dropped the ball on this one. their article states that the whale sings too low for the other whales to hear her (they DEFINITELY say it's female), and that the problem will only get worse over time as her voice will deepen with age. which will come as a bit of a suprise to scientists who've always assumed that a higher frequency gives a higher pitched note, not a lower one, and with the whale singing at 52Hz instead ... [More]
Comment icon #9 Posted by Enchntress on 19 July, 2013, 19:46
I sure hope that this whale has company. It makes me terribly sad to think of him/her out there singing away all by themselves. Looking forward to more info this fall.
Comment icon #10 Posted by d e v i c e on 19 July, 2013, 23:03
He'll be okay. He's made the right choice by not getting emotionally entangled with these other whales.
Comment icon #11 Posted by ashven on 20 July, 2013, 6:31
I'm sure he can be heard by the others,you'll notice them trying to put their fins over their ears when he talks
Comment icon #12 Posted by Artaxerxes on 20 July, 2013, 14:27
Probably a hybrid between two different species of whale. Hybrid whales are quite common. Whales are a very sexually aggressive animal just like dolphins. The genetic mixture might have affected the vocal chords or whatever it is that Whales use to produce the sounds they make.
Comment icon #13 Posted by Yamato on 21 July, 2013, 4:55
The Japanese would have to do research on how loneliness effects flavor and consider other options if it's delicious.
Comment icon #14 Posted by R4z3rsPar4d0x on 21 July, 2013, 19:31
QUOTE- "While most whales communicate at a frequency of between 17 and 18 Hertz, this particular specimen caught the attention of researchers because it was communicating at 52 Hertz. Whether due to a malformation or otherwise, this anomalous frequency means that the whale's calls will never be picked up by other whales, earning it the nickname 'world's loneliest whale'. Is he alone? I don't know. People like to imagine this creature just out there swimming by his lonesome, just singing away and nobody's listening. But I can't say that." . how do we know it can't be heard? just because it's si... [More]


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