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Jesus' cross fragment unearthed in Turkey


Posted on Monday, 5 August, 2013 | Comment icon 27 comments | News tip by: docyabut2


Image credit: Baptiste Marcel


 
Archaeologists in Turkey have discovered a relic that was originally hailed as a piece of Jesus' cross.

It was found inside a stone chest located within the 1,350-year-old Balatlar Church in Turkey's Sinop Province. While it isn't clear whether the artifact is actually a piece of the cross Jesus was crucified on, the people who originally placed it within the box would have believed that it was. "This stone chest is very important to us," said excavation team leader Gülgün Köroğlu. "It has a history and is the most important artifact we have unearthed so far."

According to historical texts, Jesus' cross was discovered in Jerusalem by St. Helena, the mother of Emperor Constantine, who distributed the pieces to church leaders across the region. Several have been reportedly discovered over the years however the authenticity of such claims remains in doubt. So many have turned up in fact that 16th century theologian John Calvin famously joked that if all the pieces were to be assembled in one place they would represent "a big shipload".

"Turkish archaeologists say they have found a stone chest in a 1,350-year-old church that appears to contain a relic venerated as a piece of Jesus' cross."

  View: Full article |  Source: NBC News

  Discuss: View comments (27)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #18 Posted by szentgyorgy on 10 August, 2013, 21:44
Sorry to have left that out. He actually wrote more screed against the Jewish people than "the Turk" (Islam).But it wasn't germane to relics. He also condemned the Roman Catholics and the reform movement that didn't agree with him. Some say he even hated himself, by way of explanation.
Comment icon #19 Posted by Harry_Dresden on 11 August, 2013, 2:35
...to put it mildly.. two thousand years of trying to pass of bits of wood as "holy relics" still has power over the gullible and weak.. and that's the REAL miracle!
Comment icon #20 Posted by Harte on 11 August, 2013, 14:22
Yes, but IMO, Twain's prose is the more humorous. Harte
Comment icon #21 Posted by szentgyorgy on 11 August, 2013, 17:40
No question.
Comment icon #22 Posted by szentgyorgy on 11 August, 2013, 17:42
No contest!
Comment icon #23 Posted by DieChecker on 12 August, 2013, 4:36
2000 years and still it seems to be working for the majority of the worlds people. The Powerful and Strong still pay at least lip service to it in fear if nothing else of loosing saiid power and strength.
Comment icon #24 Posted by ozmorphus on 17 August, 2013, 16:05
The true cross of Jesus probably no longer exists. Back when Jesus was crucified people weren't interested in grabbing trinkets in the hopes they will be worth something or famous one day. These folks were all about spreading the Gospel and also fearing for their lives. His followers denied him, hid out and lied about knowing Him so I highly doubt they would flock to the cross and start yanking off pieces in front of Roman Soldiers.
Comment icon #25 Posted by Harte on 17 August, 2013, 20:25
Probably fifty or more opeople were executed on the same cross after Jesus. Did it help them? Harte
Comment icon #26 Posted by jaylemurph on 17 August, 2013, 22:53
...it helped me learn a jaunty tune about always looking on the bright side of life... --Jaylemurph
Comment icon #27 Posted by DieChecker on 18 August, 2013, 19:50
If the same cross was there 300 years later. It probably assisted the deaths of thousands of people. If......
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