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Astronomer announces the discovery of... Mars


Posted on Thursday, 22 March, 2018 | Comment icon 9 comments

Mars... the discovery of a lifetime ? Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
One astronomer was left red-faced this week after he mistook the planet Mars for an undiscovered star.
Peter Dunsby, a cosmology professor at the University of Cape Town, recently submitted what he thought was a potentially ground-breaking new discovery to the Astronomer's Telegram - a service that reports on all the latest news in the world of astronomy.

Believing that he had identified a previously undiscovered star, Dunsby was understandably disappointed when it turned out that what he had actually discovered was the planet Mars.

The Astronomer's Telegram was later forced to apologize to its readers over the incident and offered a tongue-in-cheek congratulations to Dunsby for discovering the Red Planet.

"Lesson for today," the astronomer replied. "Check, check, triple check and then check some more."


It's currently unclear who actually did discover Mars, however Copernicus was the first person to suggest that it may be a planet and Galileo was the first to observe it through a telescope in 1609.

Sadly, it seems that Dunsby was quite a few centuries too late.

Source: Tech Times | Comments (9)

Tags: Mars

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by bison on 22 March, 2018, 21:49
Dr. Dunsby is a cosmologist and mathematician, apparently not a frequent astronomical observer. I don't fault him for not recognizing Mars when he sees it. Mars is currently centered above the 'teapot' asterism in Sagittarius. About one width of the teapot above its brim, exclusive of handle and spout.  
Comment icon #2 Posted by Noxasa on 22 March, 2018, 21:58
Well, it just goes to show you that
Comment icon #3 Posted by Nzo on 23 March, 2018, 1:26
Another example of what we would consider good research today.
Comment icon #4 Posted by South Alabam on 23 March, 2018, 1:34
"I've discovered a huge star close to earth!" "That's our sun dude'" "Oh."
Comment icon #5 Posted by Astra. on 23 March, 2018, 1:43
Oh dear, what a blooper. I hope he's not being called Professor Dumsby instead behind his back. Even so at least they took it all in good jest.   
Comment icon #6 Posted by Derek Willis on 23 March, 2018, 7:45
Surely this is some sort of "fake news". Perhaps a "joke" that was supposed to be made in a week from now (April 1st). 
Comment icon #7 Posted by paperdyer on 23 March, 2018, 12:59
He just needs to do what "The Donald" does and just say that's not what he meant.
Comment icon #8 Posted by Calibeliever on 23 March, 2018, 15:23
Peer review before publishing is never a bad idea....
Comment icon #9 Posted by Calibeliever on 23 March, 2018, 16:14
Who would consider this good research? I'm not sure I'm understanding your point. Was it just meant as a cynical jab at science in general?


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