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Space & Astronomy

Stunning image shows ice-filled crater on Mars

December 21, 2018 | Comment icon 4 comments



The crater looks like a patch of freshly fallen snow. Image Credit: CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO ESA/DLR/FU Berlin
This recently released photograph shows the 60km-wide Korolev Crater in Mars' north polar region.
Put together from images taken by the High Resolution Stereo Camera on the European Space Agency's Mars Express spacecraft, the spectacular scene shows water ice up to 2km thick.

The crater itself, which was formed by a massive impact millions of years ago, acts as a 'cold trap', producing a layer of cold air that sits directly above the ice and prevents it from melting.

The image above is comprised of five separate image strips that have been digitally combined.

The crater is named after Sergei Korolev who is considered to be the father of Soviet space technology. He worked on numerous missions including the iconic Sputnik satellites.

ESA has described the spectacle as a 'winter wonderland'.

Source: New Scientist | Comments (4)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Stiff 3 years ago
Breathtaking.
Comment icon #2 Posted by kobolds 3 years ago
Possible water at the bottom ?
Comment icon #3 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf 3 years ago
Water ice yes. Liquid water no.
Comment icon #4 Posted by Jon the frog 3 years ago
WOW, a couple of solar panels and you have a rocket fuel plant ! If ice is easily available at some places, they are the best location for a Mars base.


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