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Palaeontology

World's largest Tyrannosaurus rex unveiled

March 23, 2019 | Comment icon 11 comments



T. rex would have been a sight to behold during the Cretaceous. Image Credit: CC BY-SA 3.0 David Monniaux
A fossil T. rex named 'Scotty' has been confirmed to be the largest predatory dinosaur ever discovered.
Originally unearthed in Alberta, Canada in 1991, the fossil skeleton was encased in such hard sandstone that it took over a decade for paleontologists to unearth it and a further two decades for the dinosaur to be fully cleaned up and assembled.

As it turns out, the specimen is much larger than anyone had expected.

"This is the rex of rexes," said lead author Scott Persons. "There is considerable size variability among Tyrannosaurus. Some individuals were lankier than others and some were more robust."

"Scotty exemplifies the robust. Take careful measurements of its legs, hips, and even shoulder, and Scotty comes out a bit heftier than other T. rex specimens."
This gargantuan dinosaur weighed in at a whopping 8,800kg and measured 13 meters in length.

In addition to being the largest, it is also believed to be the oldest known T. rex specimen.

"Scotty is the oldest T. rex known," said Persons. "By which I mean, it would have had the most candles on its last birthday cake."

"You can get an idea of how old a dinosaur is by cutting into its bones and studying its growth patterns. Scotty is all old growth."



Source: Phys.org | Comments (11)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #2 Posted by Carnoferox 3 years ago
Animals growing to large sizes in the past had nothing to do with atmospheric nitrogen, sorry to say.
Comment icon #3 Posted by AllPossible 3 years ago
Don't be sorry but at least back it up with some knowledge. Kind of stupid that you got a trophy for just denying something without a reason.
Comment icon #4 Posted by Carnoferox 3 years ago
Nitrogen already makes up a majority of the atmosphere's composition, so for there to be much higher levels of nitrogen there would have to be much less oxygen. Anoxic conditions are deadly for life, not beneficial, and certainly wouldn't result in organisms attaining larger sizes. I'd like to see what articles you've been reading.
Comment icon #5 Posted by Alien Origins 3 years ago
Damn! Thats a huge T Rex! 
Comment icon #6 Posted by Not A Rockstar 3 years ago
LOL exactly what I said! 13 meters and you know it is probable there were larger we haven't found or never will.  I can't even really imagine standing on the ground and looking at one in real life. Like having a 2 story building coming at you ...
Comment icon #7 Posted by Alien Origins 3 years ago
They had a mock up of one here at one of the local now defunct malls....This thing was huge even for a mock up.
Comment icon #8 Posted by Not A Rockstar 3 years ago
@Carnoferox do we have any idea how long a T Rex may have lived? Were they sort of like elephants or crocs maybe in age and maturing? 
Comment icon #9 Posted by Carnoferox 3 years ago
There have been a few studies of Tyrannosaurus growth/lifespan. Erickson et al. (2004) found Sue to be the oldest specimen at 28 years old, and the slightly larger Scotty would have been of a similar age.
Comment icon #10 Posted by Myles 3 years ago
Took them 18 years to announce this.    They found it in 1991.  
Comment icon #11 Posted by Carnoferox 3 years ago
Well, 18 years to publish it in the scientific literature. Sadly paleontology can take a lot of time to get published results.


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