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Archaeology & History

Ancient temple found in 'Egyptian Atlantis'

By T.K. Randall
August 5, 2019 · Comment icon 10 comments



The site is an archaeological treasure trove. Image Credit: Christoph Gerigk / Franck Goddio / Hilti Foundation
Archaeologists have made multiple discoveries within the submerged ruins of the Egyptian city of Heracleion.
Located near the Canopic mouth of the Nile, the ruins of what is sometimes referred to as "Egypt's Atlantis" lie 30ft beneath Abu Qir Bay approximately 2.5 km off the coast.

Once a bustling trading port, the city's ruins now serve as a fascinating glimpse into the past.

During a recent expedition, Egyptian and European divers reported the discovery of a large underwater temple as well as the wrecks of several ships laden with ancient treasures.

The discoveries were made using a combination of geophysical data from side-scan sonar, satellite positioning, nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometers and echo sounders.
Divers exploring the ruins were also able to locate coins, jewelry, utensils and pottery.

Some of the coins were found to be from the Byzantine era, which suggests that the city must have been occupied up until at least the 4th Century BCE.

The city itself was thought to have been built during the 8th Century BCE.

The exact cause of its demise however continues to remain something of a mystery.



Source: Science Alert | Comments (10)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Hammerclaw 4 years ago
I saw a report about it. The finds are lush and opulent, as if they had found Atlantis, only better.
Comment icon #2 Posted by Manwon Lender 4 years ago
Interesting article, thanks for sharing.
Comment icon #3 Posted by Orphalesion 4 years ago
Heracleion!
Comment icon #4 Posted by South Alabam 4 years ago
 My guess is it slid into the sea due to unstable foundations as listed. It might have had a volcanic underlying base lower down.
Comment icon #5 Posted by highdesert50 4 years ago
This is an interesting conclusion. I had assumed that because the last ice ended about ten to eleven thousand years ago and the depth of the oceans were over one hundred meters lower, that the construction that was once above water would now be submerged. Would be quite interesting if your 'guess' could be measured as there is also speculation that the sea was heavily fed by freshwater sources and there might be a lot of silt present perhaps causing instability.
Comment icon #6 Posted by MissJatti 4 years ago
Need to add this to Assassins Creed Origins 
Comment icon #7 Posted by Rolci 4 years ago
My only question is this: Why wait till 2019 with this? Is diving a new thing? Has there been an earth-shattering technological advancement in the diving industry just now that made this possible? I mean this site has been there for all this time, we have 8 billion people, Egypt is a popular diving destination, so why is it discovered only now?
Comment icon #8 Posted by Herr Falukorv 4 years ago
they didnīt!  They found it 1999
Comment icon #9 Posted by Rolci 4 years ago
And it took 20 years for this to hit the news???
Comment icon #10 Posted by Herr Falukorv 4 years ago
No it didnt... If you had read and watched the links in the op it says clear as day that what they found now was a temple...


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