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Space & Astronomy

Mercury set for rare transit of the Sun tomorrow

November 10, 2019 | Comment icon 2 comments



This image shows the path Mercury took during its 2016 transit of the Sun. Image Credit: NASA
This spectacular celestial event, which only happens a few times per century, will be visible for 5.5 hours.
Skywatchers will be turning their attention towards the Sun on Monday as the planet Mercury - the closest world to our star - will be crossing its disk for the first time since 2016.

After the event is over, another Mercury transit will not occur again until the year 2032.

During the 5.5 hours Mercury will take to cross the Sun's disk, the transit will be visible across most of the world with the exception of Japan, Indonesia, Australia and parts of Asia.
It will begin before sunrise in western North America and end after sunset in Europe and Africa.

The entire thing will be visible for those living in the eastern parts of North America.

If you want to see the transit for yourself however it's important not to look directly at the Sun or to look at it through binoculars. Instead, use a telescope with a solar filter or watch a livestream online.

A video explaining the transit in more detail can be viewed below.



Source: Gizmodo | Comments (2)



Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Amanda Evans 2 years ago
Heavy cloud in my area... Not that I would be able see it.
Comment icon #2 Posted by L.A.T.1961 2 years ago
Same for me. If you have binoculars, do not look through them at the sun but point at the sun and project an image onto a far, inside, room wall. Cover one front lens first to stop a double image. Darkening the room will also help. 


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