Wednesday, December 7, 2022
Contact    |    RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon  
You are viewing: Home > News > Space & Astronomy > News story
Welcome Guest ( Login or Register )  
Space & Astronomy

Scientists identify organism that eats meteorites

By T.K. Randall
December 7, 2019 · Comment icon 2 comments



Does life hitch a ride on meteorites ? Image Credit: YouTube / Central Michigan University
A microbe with an appetite for meteorites has shown that space rocks may be able to carry life across the cosmos.
Because meteorites played such an important role in depositing the rare elements necessary for complex life on our planet to develop, researchers have been keen to determine if there are any organisms capable of surviving off the minerals contained within them.

While some bacteria are already known to oxidise the iron within meteorites, the scientists wanted to look for something that would find more than just a small part of these space rocks appetizing.

They finally settled on Metallosphaera sedula - a microbe capable of surviving in the soil on Mars.

To test it, they exposed it to a meteorite known as Northwest Africa 1172 (NWA 1172).
"NWA 1172 is a multimetallic material, which may provide much more trace metals to facilitate metabolic activity and microbial growth," said astrobiologist Tetyana Milojevic.

"Moreover, the porosity of NWA 1172 might also reflect the superior growth rate of M. sedula."

The results of the experiment were extraordinary and demonstrated that the microbes were quite content to be feeding on the combination of minerals contained within the samples.

Given that some types of microbes have already been shown to be capable of surviving in the vacuum of space, it is not unreasonable to speculate that they could hitch a ride on meteorites.

"Our investigations validate the ability of M. sedula to perform the biotransformation of meteorite minerals, unravel microbial fingerprints left on meteorite material, and provide the next step towards an understanding of meteorite biogeochemistry," said Milojevic.

Source: Science Alert | Comments (2)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Seti42 3 years ago
I'm waiting for macroscopic life that can live off of meteorites.
Comment icon #2 Posted by Ozfactor 3 years ago
I hope these meteorite eating organisms like plastic 


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


Our new book is out now!

The Unexplained Mysteries
Book of Weird News

 AVAILABLE NOW 

Take a walk on the weird side with this compilation of some of the weirdest stories ever to grace the pages of a newspaper.

Click here to learn more

We need your help!

Support us on Patreon

 BONUS CONTENT 

For less than the cost of a cup of coffee, you can gain access to a wide range of exclusive perks including our popular 'Lost Ghost Stories' series.

Click here to learn more

 Total Posts: 7,369,022    Topics: 303,281    Members: 199,007

 Not a member yet ? Click here to join - registration is free and only takes a moment!
Recent news and articles