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Who terrorizes the tyrannosaurs ?


Posted on Friday, 22 November, 2013 | Comment icon 12 comments

The ancestors of T. rex faced a formidable opponent. Image Credit: CC BY-SA 3.0 Scott Robert Anselmo
A newly discovered dinosaur is believed to have been more than a match for the relatives of T. rex.
Known as Siats meekerorum, the 40ft long meat eater lived around 98 million years ago and would have been a formidable rival to any other predatory dinosaurs of the time. Living 30 million years before Tyrannosaurus rex, Siats is believed to have dominated its ancestors long before the tyrant lizard itself appeared on the scene.

"Contemporary tyrannosaurs would have been no more than a nuisance to Siats, like jackals at a lion kill," said study leader Dr Lindsay Zanno. "It wasn’t until carcharodontosaurs like this bowed out that the stage could be set for the evolution of T. rex."

Fossil bones of Siats were discovered in the Cedar Mountain Formation in Utah and appeared to belong to a juvenile measuring approximately 30ft in length. It is believed that the species would have mostly hunted slow moving herbivores and that it may have fought off rival predators to secure its kills.

"It has been 63 years since a predator of this size has been named from North America," said Dr Zanno. "You can’t imagine how thrilled we were to see the bones of this behemoth poking out of the hillside."

Source: Telegraph | Comments (12)

Tags: Tyrannosaurus, Dinosaur


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #3 Posted by ShadowOfMothman on 22 November, 2013, 16:09
It looks like a Tyrannosaurus rex because it is a Tyrannosaurus rex. The picture in this article is the same picture of Tyrannosaurus rex on Wikipedia..... Looks exactly like a T-rex...exactly how do they tell if this is a different species altogether. I mean sure it liked a long long time before hand, but it literally looks (to someone who doesn't study dinosaurs obviously) a T-rex. Anybody here a dinosaur lover? Because I'm thinking why name it a new species, it could just be a early version of the T. Actually, it's pretty clear, just from the picture, that this animal is not related to T. r... [More]
Comment icon #4 Posted by Euphorbia on 22 November, 2013, 16:26
Actually, it's pretty clear, just from the picture, that this animal is not related to T. rex. You can clearly tell from the shape of its skull its a carcharodontosaur. And even if it was an earlier "version" of T. rex it would still be considered a different species. The dinosaur in the picture is not a T. rex. It has a different skull shape and longer arms, with three fingered hands. T. rex had a more robust skull, shorter arms, and only two fingers on each hand. So, you're trying to tell me you're a dinosaur expert and Wikipedia inserted an incorrect picture? Do you have any proof to back u... [More]
Comment icon #5 Posted by pj bandit on 22 November, 2013, 16:31
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyrannosaurus here take a look or yourself, its from Carnegie museum of natural history.
Comment icon #6 Posted by LimeGelatin on 22 November, 2013, 16:44
Asteroids, volcanoes, and cold weather also do the trick... -LoLzzz
Comment icon #7 Posted by Leonardo on 22 November, 2013, 17:14
So, you're trying to tell me you're a dinosaur expert and Wikipedia inserted an incorrect picture? Do you have any proof to back up these claims? http://en.wikipedia....i/Tyrannosaurus here take a look or yourself, its from Carnegie museum of natural history. I believe SoM is referring to the artistic impression of Siats meekerorum in the Telegraph article, whereas you two are referring to the photo of a T. rex skeleton mounted at the Carnegie Museum, in the article here on UM. Two different pictures showing two different dinosaurs. SoM is correct in his statements that the picture in the Tele... [More]
Comment icon #8 Posted by Euphorbia on 22 November, 2013, 17:21
OK, I see the problem. The picture in the UM article shows a Tyrannosaurus rex, not the dinosaur in question. You have to go to the original article by the Telegraph for the real picture. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/dinosaurs/10467589/Dinosaur-that-terrorised-the-Tyrannosaurs-found.html
Comment icon #9 Posted by woopypooky on 23 November, 2013, 10:22
looked exactly like t-rex, except it has furs
Comment icon #10 Posted by Frank Merton on 23 November, 2013, 10:35
I strongly doubt T. Rex had any competitors in its time frame and its range. Other dinosaurs that could have given it competition lived other times and other places. The only animal it would have had to fear then was another T. Rex.
Comment icon #11 Posted by ShadowOfMothman on 23 November, 2013, 13:41
I believe SoM is referring to the artistic impression of Siats meekerorum in the Telegraph article, whereas you two are referring to the photo of a T. rex skeleton mounted at the Carnegie Museum, in the article here on UM. Two different pictures showing two different dinosaurs. SoM is correct in his statements that the picture in the Telegraph clearly shows a carcharodontosaur. The blade-like teeth immediately distinguish it from a Tyrannosaur. That's exactly what I meant. Thanks for clearing this up
Comment icon #12 Posted by ZaraKitty on 13 December, 2013, 13:42
T-rex won out by being hairless and one finger-less? Take that earlier apex predator!


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