Saturday, July 23, 2016
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help   RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in

World's oceans move into 'extinction phase'


Posted on Thursday, 23 June, 2011 | Comment icon 111 comments | News tip by: Still Waters


Image credit: Toby Hudson

 
Scientists warn that human activities may have pushed our oceans in to a new "extinction phase".

Marine experts have published a report outlining the decline in the condition of the world's oceans. Eco systems such as coral reefs are in danger of disappearing, as are fish stocks; an increase in carbon dioxide elevating ocean temperatures is one factor being blamed for these changes.

"A preliminary report from an international panel of marine experts said that the condition of the world's seas was worsening more quickly than had been predicted."

  View: Full article |  Source: Telegraph

  Discuss: View comments (111)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #102 Posted by septic peg on 10 July, 2011, 20:24
This is the central theme of the prophetic movie Soylent Green. In the end the only source of protein left on the planet is algae, but as the oceans continue to warm productivity falls off a cliff. Eventually they resort to the end game of all overpopulated human cultures - cannibalism in the form of recycled dead people which is turned into "Soylent Green" food blocks. The movie ends with the classic and chilling line - "Soylent Green is people". Br Cornelius Cool sounding movie, gonna search for and watch it!!
Comment icon #103 Posted by Trakyan on 18 August, 2011, 5:59
didnt need no experts to tell me the worlds eco system is falling apart i mean think about the over a hundred species going extinct in a rainforest each day
Comment icon #104 Posted by Little Fish on 18 August, 2011, 10:33
over a hundred species going extinct in a rainforest each day how do you know this? seems to be a wild claim.
Comment icon #105 Posted by Doug1o29 on 18 August, 2011, 15:34
how do you know this? seems to be a wild claim. The background extinction rate, based on fossil evidence is between 10 and 100 species per year. But this is only for species that leave fossil records. The true background rate, is undoubtedly much higher. The current extinction rate is about 27,000 species per year. That's about 74 species per day. So, you're right: 100 species per day is exaggerated, but is that enough to call it a "wild claim?" Most of the 27,000 species are tropical insects, particularly in the Amazon Basin. Habitat loss seems to be the major cause. Marine ecosystems are les... [More]
Comment icon #106 Posted by Little Fish on 19 August, 2011, 11:32
The current extinction rate is about 27,000 species per yearhow do you know this?think about how you would even measure this. it would be a huge undertaking to take even one reliable measurement, let alone continous measurements. given the standard of what gets published these days and the huge rise in retractions of scientific papers, I'd take that figure with a pinch of salt.
Comment icon #107 Posted by Br Cornelius on 19 August, 2011, 12:23
how do you know this? think about how you would even measure this. it would be a huge undertaking to take even one reliable measurement, let alone continous measurements. given the standard of what gets published these days and the huge rise in retractions of scientific papers, I'd take that figure with a pinch of salt. Doug explained this. It is an estimate based on the relative proportions of different phyla of species. You are correct in saying that it would be nearly impossible to directly correctly count - but if we have direct observations of the higher phyla we can make a very educated ... [More]
Comment icon #108 Posted by Doug1o29 on 19 August, 2011, 18:42
how do you know this? think about how you would even measure this. it would be a huge undertaking to take even one reliable measurement, let alone continous measurements. given the standard of what gets published these days and the huge rise in retractions of scientific papers, I'd take that figure with a pinch of salt. For beetles: Pick 100 overstory trees in the Amazon rain forest. Place cone-shaped collectors in a grid pattern on the ground. Fog the trees with insecticide. Collect the cones and see what beetles/insects you have collected. Wait a few years, then repeat the process. Wait a fe... [More]
Comment icon #109 Posted by Little Fish on 19 August, 2011, 21:42
Species–area relationships always overestimate extinction rates from habitat loss Extinction from habitat loss is the signature conservation problem of the twenty-first century. Despite its importance, estimating extinction rates is still highly uncertain because no proven direct methods or reliable data exist for verifying extinctions... http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v473/n7347/full/nature09985.html from wikipedia:
Comment icon #110 Posted by dalia on 19 August, 2011, 21:55
If this is similar to every other mass extinction in history, then I would think humans are not responsible.
Comment icon #111 Posted by Spid3rCyd3 on 20 August, 2011, 6:02
Red Tide, fun times ahead.


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


  On the forums
Forum posts:
Forum topics:
Members:

5728262
259887
161381

 
What made the Man in the Moon's right eye ?
7-23-2016
Researchers in the US have been able to determine the origins of one of the moon's largest craters.
Ground in Siberia is starting to go bouncy
7-22-2016
The unseasonably warmer weather appears to be having an adverse effect on the Siberian permafrost.
Police called over UK black panther sighting
7-22-2016
Authorities were notified after a large black creature was spotted chasing deer in North West England.
Major project fails to detect dark matter
7-21-2016
Scientists have shut down their state-of-the-art dark matter detector after it failed to find anything.
Other news in this category
Ducks much smarter than previously thought
Posted 7-18-2016 | 7 comments
Ducks and other birds may possess far greater cognitive abilities than anyone had ever realized....
 
Wonders abound in the world's deepest abyss
Posted 7-16-2016 | 4 comments
The Okeanos Explorer vessel has revealed an undersea realm filled with weird and wonderful life forms....
 
Amazon tree discoveries will take 300 years
Posted 7-13-2016 | 5 comments
It turns out that it will take centuries for scientists to discover all the different species of trees....
 
'Ghost fish' spotted alive for the first time
Posted 7-5-2016 | 6 comments
Scientists have filmed an extremely rare type of fish more than 2,500ft below the surface of the sea....
 
Plants are very good at making decisions
Posted 7-4-2016 | 14 comments
Despite not even having a brain, plants are actually quite adept at making important life choices....
 
Hordes of spider crabs gather near Melbourne
Posted 6-17-2016 | 9 comments
An Australian aquatic scientist has captured footage of the crustaceans congregating in Port Phillip Bay....
 
Giant lizard tries to break in to man's house
Posted 6-16-2016 | 19 comments
A man in Thailand returned home on Wednesday to find a huge monitor lizard trying to force its way in....
 
Electric eels can jump out and attack you
Posted 6-7-2016 | 8 comments
A new study has found that electric eels are able to jump out of the water to electrocute predators....
 
Explorer finds giant earthworm in rainforest
Posted 6-6-2016 | 14 comments
Entomologist and TV host Phil Torres encountered the 4ft invertebrate during a tropical rainstorm....
 
Snails make decisions using only two neurons
Posted 6-4-2016 | 9 comments
The humble freshwater snail manages to engage in complex decision-making using only two brain cells....
 
'Baby dragon' hatches out in Slovenia cave
Posted 6-2-2016 | 14 comments
An extremely rare form of cave-dwelling salamander has emerged from its egg in Slovenia's Postojna cave....
 

 View: More news in this category
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.7 Unexplained-Mysteries.com © 2001-2015
Privacy Policy and Disclaimer   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ