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Recognition and respect for cryptobiologists

Posted on Thursday, 23 June, 2011 | Comment icon 30 comments | News tip by: Karlis


Image credit: stockxpert

 
A shout out to the Bigfoot hunters and other researchers who dedicate their lives to finding cryptids.

Somewhat excluded from the realm of mainstream science, cryptozoology involves the search for new unidentified and extinct species of animals based on reports and stories from around the world. From the Loch Ness Monster to the Loveland Frog, the number of cases of strange encounters with unknown creatures are as numerous as they are bizarre.

"Everyone knows about fabled creatures like Nessie and Bigfoot, but cryptobiologists actually chase a far larger menagerie of exotic beasts which they collectively term "cryptids"."

  View: Full article

 Source: New Scientist


  Discuss: View comments (30)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #21 Posted by Swede on 27 June, 2011, 0:14
It may sound flippant, but it is a valid question. How does one distinguish between "serious" cryptozoologists and...not sure what to call them..."non-serious" ones? A valid point, especially considering that "cryptozoology" is a comparatively recent term that has no standing as an actual branch of the sciences. .
Comment icon #22 Posted by DieChecker on 27 June, 2011, 0:33
The issue with attempting to view cryptozoology as a worthy scientific endeavour is it really isn't. While yes, there are plenty of species left undiscovered in rainforests and oceans across the world, they are left so because they have no been seen by humans ever. They are the species that live in uninhabitable parts of the world, not the kind who walk around and shake people's trailers. And these undiscovered species aren't being sought after by cryptozoologists, when they do turn up it is to real zoologists and biologists. Cryptozoology is only interested in looking for implausible creature... [More]
Comment icon #23 Posted by modas on 27 June, 2011, 20:34
Why should they be praised or respected?Have you seen finding bigfoot? :lol: :w00t: What a joke. Shouldn't they have to prove their worth just like the rest of us? Not one of them has ever found a damn thing, including the animals mentioned in the OP. kangoro first seen by peple sayd to be stud up like people had two heads vhich lookedlike dears with no horns and they jumped like frogs and no body beleved those people and this explains not just how crazy people can tell about unknown animals but it explains that people can find cryptids.
Comment icon #24 Posted by evancj on 27 June, 2011, 22:39
kangoro first seen by peple sayd to be stud up like people had two heads vhich lookedlike dears with no horns and they jumped like frogs and no body beleved those people and this explains not just how crazy people can tell about unknown animals but it explains that people can find cryptids. Since the concept of cryptozoology did not exist when kangaroos were first described by Europeans it would have been impossible for a cryptozoologist to have made that discovery.
Comment icon #25 Posted by Doctor_Strangelove on 27 June, 2011, 22:51
kangoro first seen by peple sayd to be stud up like people had two heads vhich lookedlike dears with no horns and they jumped like frogs and no body beleved those people and this explains not just how crazy people can tell about unknown animals but it explains that people can find cryptids. Kangaroos weren't discovered by cryptozoology
Comment icon #26 Posted by Carnivorous Entity on 28 June, 2011, 21:29
There is not one animal in this article that is even close to a cyrptid. They are what they are, previously unknown species to science. Show me bigfoot or nessie and I will look at cryptozoology in a new light. I think the person who wrote this article took a few to many liberties with the truth. Perhaps you should not take everything you read at face value. Well what's quantifying a cryptid for you? People who like to discount cryptozoology say that pretty much any species discovered fairly recently weren't cryptids. Why, though? Take the Okapi. There were myths surrounding it. For something ... [More]
Comment icon #27 Posted by aquatus1 on 28 June, 2011, 22:53
Well what's quantifying a cryptid for you? People who like to discount cryptozoology say that pretty much any species discovered fairly recently weren't cryptids. Why, though? Take the Okapi. There were myths surrounding it. For something to be a cryptid it doesn't necessarily have to be an acid-spitting death worm or a giant ape, does it now? If a biologist were to confirm a new species that had folklore or sightings, then that would make it a cryptid, would it not? No, it would not. Cryptids are not simply "unknown" animals. Cryptids are "hidden" animals. As in they are not just hidden from ... [More]
Comment icon #28 Posted by Carnivorous Entity on 28 June, 2011, 23:58
No, it would not. Cryptids are not simply "unknown" animals. Cryptids are "hidden" animals. As in they are not just hidden from sight, but from pretty much all other means of detection. Cryptozoology is generally used to refer to the study of two sorts of creature: creatures that are incompatible with the environment, and creatures that are out of place and/or time. The second type of cryptid is not really such a mystery, with the increased access of travel and the unfortunate human predilection of bringing home strange animals, getting bored of them, and releasing them into the wild. It is th... [More]
Comment icon #29 Posted by evancj on 29 June, 2011, 0:45
Well what's quantifying a cryptid for you? People who like to discount cryptozoology say that pretty much any species discovered fairly recently weren't cryptids. Why, though? Take the Okapi. There were myths surrounding it. I have struggled with this very same question Mr. Entity for a multitude of reasons. I think the main reason is because I have a general biology degree (I am not a biologist and never have been). Also because the term is relatively a new concept, and a very loosely defined one, I have a hard time accepting it as valid. There seems not to be a consensus for the meaning of t... [More]
Comment icon #30 Posted by Carnivorous Entity on 29 June, 2011, 5:48
Cryptozoology has no discipline, rules or standards, its a free-fraul to see who can get the next TV show, or make the most money from books, field trips, videos, photos, and t-shirts. Very sadly true. If all those louts spent time doing anything but looking for(and exploiting) one particular(and implausible) animal, they may have actually discovered a few new species by now.


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