Saturday, May 27, 2017
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help   RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in
This news story is archived which means that, while it is still available to view, the information contained within may be outdated and the original source site/link may no longer be viewable.

For the most recent stories, please visit either the site's home page or main news section.

Fireball planet orbits star in 8.5 hours

Posted on Tuesday, 20 August, 2013 | Comment icon 11 comments


Image credit: NASA/ESA

 
A newly discovered Earth-sized world around a distant star completes a full orbit in a matter of hours.

Dubbed Kepler 78b, the small world orbits its parent star at a distance 40 times closer than Mercury's orbit of our own sun. Not only does this produce an extremely short orbital period but the planet itself is a smouldering, hellish world with temperatures exceeding 3,000 Kelvin. By contrast, Mercury's maximum surface temperature peaks at around 700 Kelvin.

The newly discovered planet has a few other surprises in store as well. It is the first time scientists have been able to directly observe light from a planet of this size and because of its tight orbit, it is believed that it may be possible to determine its mass, a feat never achieved before for a planet outside of our own solar system.

"Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have discovered a new, Earth-sized exoplanet for which orbiting its star is literally all in a day's work."

  View: Full article

 Source: The Register


  Discuss: View comments (11)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #2 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 20 August, 2013, 12:29
As close to its star as this planet is, I am surprised the stars gravitational pull didn't suck it right into itself. It doesn't work like that. If the orbital velocity is correct then theoretically you could orbit 2 inches above the star. In reality that can't happen. Stars have an atmosphere and if the planet orbits within this then drag will slow the planet and that will cause it to spiral into the star. Also there is the Roche Limit. If the planet orbits lower than the stars Roche limit then tidal forces will tear it apart.
Comment icon #3 Posted by Ryu on 20 August, 2013, 13:37
Yeah, with a velocity like that I suppose the planets orbit can be maintained for quite some time. But what about the slingshot effect. With a high velocity rate, isn't it possible for the planet to be flung away at some point?
Comment icon #4 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 20 August, 2013, 14:06
But what about the slingshot effect. With a high velocity rate, isn't it possible for the planet to be flung away at some point? Again it doesn't work like that. If an object is in orbit it means that the force trying to make it fly away from the object it is orbit around (inertia) is balanced by the force trying to pull it into the object it is orbiting (gravity). They will remain balanced unless another force acts on them.
Comment icon #5 Posted by Sundew on 20 August, 2013, 14:32
As close to its star as this planet is, I am surprised the stars gravitational pull didn't suck it right into itself. Anyways, that was pretty neat to read. Again science learns more and more each day. At our galactic center stars are racing around a black hole as well, and while the BH may be pulling gases off their surfaces and "consuming" the gas, despite the intense gravitation (billions of times that of our sun), they do not just fall into the black hole, they orbit it. It would take some other object, say another star, passing close by to change the orbit of the star in question, in whic... [More]
Comment icon #6 Posted by pallidin on 20 August, 2013, 14:55
Amazing. I like how, even after being(somewhat out-of-service) that there is more previous data to pour over and examine. I say "somewhat" because even though 2 out the 4 gyros have failed, I think I heard that they are considering using the onboard mini-thrusters to somewhat stabilize the telescope for additional imaging. Maybe Waspie has more info on that.
Comment icon #7 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 20 August, 2013, 16:45
I say "somewhat" because even though 2 out the 4 gyros have failed, I think I heard that they are considering using the onboard mini-thrusters to somewhat stabilize the telescope for additional imaging. Maybe Waspie has more info on that. Basically Kepler's planet hunting days are over. NASA is looking into what useful mission it could now carry out. There is more info HERE.
Comment icon #8 Posted by brlesq1 on 20 August, 2013, 22:32
What a great article. Too bad Kepler failed.
Comment icon #9 Posted by Rolci on 21 August, 2013, 13:08
So what WOULDN'T melt on the surface?
Comment icon #10 Posted by shrooma on 21 August, 2013, 19:34
So what WOULDN'T melt on the surface? . Adamantium. Superman's underpants. margaret thatcher's heart. a frozen 20lb turkey at 11am on christmas morning..... ;-)
Comment icon #11 Posted by spacecowboy342 on 23 August, 2013, 18:17
At our galactic center stars are racing around a black hole as well, and while the BH may be pulling gases off their surfaces and "consuming" the gas, despite the intense gravitation (billions of times that of our sun), they do not just fall into the black hole, they orbit it. It would take some other object, say another star, passing close by to change the orbit of the star in question, in which case it might fall in, be flung away, or merely change its orbit. Just think of the earth's orbit around our own sun, or the moon around the earth, on our time scale, the orbits are very stable. We do... [More]


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


  On the forums
Winchester Mystery House opens new rooms
5-27-2017
The mysterious mansion in California has opened several new rooms to the public for the first time ever.
Some snakes are now known to hunt in packs
5-26-2017
Scientists have revealed that some species of snake have learned how to co-operate and hunt in groups.
Ancient sea monster was the size of a bus
5-26-2017
Palaeontologists in Russia have discovered a huge new sea creature that lived 130 million years ago.
Mystery surrounds 'SOS' in Australian outback
5-26-2017
Police in Western Australia have been investigating a large 'SOS' sign discovered in a remote area.
Other news in this category
NASA to probe $10,000 quadrillion asteroid
Posted 5-25-2017 | 10 comments
The iron-rich asteroid 16 Psyche is so valuable that, if mined, it would collapse the global economy....
 
Neil Armstrong's bag could fetch up to $4M
Posted 5-23-2017 | 4 comments
A bag used by the late astronaut to collect samples during the Apollo 11 mission is to be sold at auction....
 
Astronauts to undertake emergency spacewalk
Posted 5-22-2017 | 10 comments
The two-hour spacewalk, which is set to take place on Tuesday, will aim to repair a broken data relay box....
 
New Horizons will reach MU69 in January 2019
Posted 5-21-2017 | 0 comments
Following its groundbreaking flyby of Pluto, the probe is now on its way to another Kuiper Belt object....
 
Elon Musk could actually beat NASA to Mars
Posted 5-17-2017 | 15 comments
The SpaceX CEO has a timetable for getting to Mars that could edge out NASA's manned mission schedule....
 
Has evidence of the multiverse been found ?
Posted 5-17-2017 | 14 comments
A 'cold spot' that has puzzled scientists for years could be the point where two universes collided....
 
Exoplanet Proxima b has a 'stable climate'
Posted 5-16-2017 | 4 comments
Scientists have been trying to work out what the weather might be like on this recently discovered world....
 
NASA scraps manned Orion-SLS launch plan
Posted 5-15-2017 | 9 comments
The US space agency has decided against placing astronauts aboard its new rocket on its first launch....
 
Clouds, water vapor found on exoplanet
Posted 5-14-2017 | 8 comments
Astronomers have been analyzing the atmosphere of a Neptune-sized planet located 430 light years away....
 
Physicists clash over Big Bang controversy
Posted 5-13-2017 | 14 comments
Some of the world's most respected scientists have penned an open later in response to a recent article....
 
Massive waves of molten rock spotted on Io
Posted 5-11-2017 | 1 comment
Scientists have revealed the extent of the volcanic activity that is occurring on Jupiter's moon Io. ...
 

 View: More news in this category
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.7 Unexplained-Mysteries.com © 2001-2017
Privacy Policy and Disclaimer   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ