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Science & Technology

Dolly scientist supports mammoth cloning

August 1, 2013 | Comment icon 28 comments



Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons
The discovery of 10,000-year-old mammoth blood has opened up the possibility of creating a clone.
Discovered in the ice on a remote Russian island, the remains were so well preserved that the blood was actually in a liquid state. Ian Wilmut, the scientist behind the creation of Dolly the sheep, believes that the find could lead to the creation of a cloned mammoth.

"I think it should be done as long as we can provide great care for the animal," he said. "If there are reasonable prospects of them being healthy, we should do it. We can learn a lot about them."
The astonishingly well-preserved blood from a 10,000-year-old frozen mammoth could lead to mammoth stem cells, said Ian Wilmut, the scientist responsible for Dolly, the world’s first cloned animal - and might ultimately lead to a cloned mammoth.


Source: Fox News | Comments (28)



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Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #19 Posted by R4z3rsPar4d0x 8 years ago
I don't think mammoths would be cloned in order to reintroduce them into the wild. They would be solely for scientific research. I have no problem with the cloning of a mammoth, or any other extinct creature for that matter, so long as they are not reintroduced into the wild. With regards to other species going extinct; I think humans have less of an impact than we actually think. Yes humans are responsible for the extinction of some species of animals, but in reality the percentage is very low indeed. "Saving endangered species is just one more arrogant attempt by humans to control nature. It... [More]
Comment icon #20 Posted by Myles 8 years ago
But don't you think the Mammoth went extinct for a reason? I mean If mother nature knows best and I think she does then is it really right to bring an extinct animal back? I don't think "mother nature" is an entity at all. If a volcano erupts and kills the last of a species, I don't think "it was meant to be" is a good reason. If humans could have removed a few of the animals in order to save the species, I say go for it.
Comment icon #21 Posted by R4z3rsPar4d0x 8 years ago
I don't think "mother nature" is an entity at all. If a volcano erupts and kills the last of a species, I don't think "it was meant to be" is a good reason. If humans could have removed a few of the animals in order to save the species, I say go for it. I guess I just don't see the point of bringing it back
Comment icon #22 Posted by Myles 8 years ago
I don't think "mother nature" is an entity at all. If a volcano erupts and kills the last of a species, I don't think "it was meant to be" is a good reason. If humans could have removed a few of the animals in order to save the species, I say go for it. I'd like to see it. As far as larger animals go, a herbivore isn't a bad choice.
Comment icon #23 Posted by R4z3rsPar4d0x 8 years ago
I'd like to see it. As far as larger animals go, a herbivore isn't a bad choice. Just because you can do something doesn't necessarily mean you should
Comment icon #24 Posted by Myles 8 years ago
Just because you can do something doesn't necessarily mean you should Valid point, but I don't see a reason not to. If enough samples could be found to breed a small population, the tundra areas could handle this animal back in the wild. Not sure it would ever get to that.
Comment icon #25 Posted by R4z3rsPar4d0x 8 years ago
Valid point, but I don't see a reason not to. If enough samples could be found to breed a small population, the tundra areas could handle this animal back in the wild. Not sure it would ever get to that.
Comment icon #26 Posted by chiphead 8 years ago
But don't you think the Mammoth went extinct for a reason? I mean If mother nature knows best and I think she does then is it really right to bring an extinct animal back? I don't think they died out for a 'reason'. TBH I don't know off hand why they died out, but i think nature is just randomess. The dinosaurs died out because eath was hit by a meteor. Is that a logical 'reason' or is it just randomness. And yes I think it is right to bring an extinct animal back. Purely for scientific reasons. For curiosity. But on the other hand, what path would this lead us down? I don't believe in cloning... [More]
Comment icon #27 Posted by chiphead 8 years ago
Valid point, but I don't see a reason not to. If enough samples could be found to breed a small population, the tundra areas could handle this animal back in the wild. Not sure it would ever get to that. noooooooo. I don't agree about reintroducing them to the wild. Nature has changed since they were removed from the food chain. It would not be fair to the animals that exist and thrive in that environment now.
Comment icon #28 Posted by Myles 8 years ago
noooooooo. I don't agree about reintroducing them to the wild. Nature has changed since they were removed from the food chain. It would not be fair to the animals that exist and thrive in that environment now. Since they are herbivours, I don't think it is that big of a deal provided a study is done to back it up. Much of the tundra is pretty baron.


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