Wednesday, March 21, 2018
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help   RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in

Milky Way has 100 million life-giving planets

Posted on Monday, 9 June, 2014 | Comment icon 132 comments

Our galaxy could be teeming with life. Image Credit: NASA/ESA/ESO
A group of astronomers has estimated the number of habitable planets in our galaxy for the first time.
As the number of extrasolar planet discoveries increases, so too does our overall understanding of the nature and distribution of planetary bodies in our galaxy. It has long been speculated that there could be many more habitable Earth-like worlds spread out across the cosmos but determining exactly how many has remained something of a challenge.

Now a group of astronomers has come up with a new computational method through which they believe they have found the answer.

Taking in to consideration everything we know about extrasolar planets the group has calculated that there could be at least 100 million worlds within the Milky Way galaxy on which primitive life could feasibly develop.

"This study does not indicate that complex life exists on that many planets," the authors wrote. "We're saying that there are planetary conditions that could support it."

"Complex life doesn't mean intelligent life though it doesn't rule it out or even animal life but simply that organisms larger and more complex than microbes could exist in a number of different forms."

Source: | Comments (132)

Tags: Extrasolar Planet, Life

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #123 Posted by aquatus1 on 13 June, 2014, 21:28
Most certainly not just "because it was there". We went there for the same reason people want to climb every mountain and swim every sea. Because of the competition. Once someone does it, people stop caring about it. Besides there is a huge difference in exploring a world an terraforming it. Right now, sure. There used to be a huge difference in walking over the next mountain to discover the next valley, and building a new village there. Nowadays, not so much. ]Edited to add:[/u]People swim the English Channel because it is there. People dug a tunnel under the English Channel to make money. Ye... [More]
Comment icon #124 Posted by Waspie_Dwarf on 13 June, 2014, 22:04
When we finally go back to the moon, no one is going to be struck with a sense of awe at the accomplishment. Most people will be more along the lines of "about time." All very interesting but a total non-argument when it comes to terraforming. Terraforming will not be done "because it is there". It is a vast engineering task NOT an act of exploration. No one ever bridged a river or tunnel through a mountain "because it was there". When people build the world's tallest structure they don't do it just because they can, sure the prestige is part of the reason, but profit is the driving force. If ... [More]
Comment icon #125 Posted by aquatus1 on 14 June, 2014, 10:42
Terraforming will not be done "because it is there". It is a vast engineering task NOT an act of exploration. "Because it's there" isn't about exploration. It's about conquest. No one ever bridged a river or tunnel through a mountain "because it was there". We went to the moon "because it was there", i.e. we wanted to be the first guys there. When people build the world's tallest structure they don't do it just because they can, sure the prestige is part of the reason, but profit is the driving force. Sure. It's like swimming the English Channel. It's cool and all, but it's been done. The only... [More]
Comment icon #126 Posted by gatekeeper32 on 14 June, 2014, 13:46
Hopefully more intelligent then we are.
Comment icon #127 Posted by toast on 14 June, 2014, 13:56
Hopefully more intelligent then we are.
Comment icon #128 Posted by TheGreatBeliever on 14 June, 2014, 14:14
If they do find complex life I only have two questions; how much of it is there and how delicious is it? If any it'd be extremely expensive imported here
Comment icon #129 Posted by Frank Merton on 14 June, 2014, 14:24
And would upset your stomach something fierce.
Comment icon #130 Posted by Gomar on 18 June, 2014, 1:34
"Yes 400 billion divided by 100 million and you have the average amount of habitable planets revolving around each star."ppCool. And multiply that by number of galaxies in the Universe and you get the total number of aliens watching Football(Soccer) world series on their alien world.pYet, for some reason I havent seen any green skinned aliens walking around Times Square.
Comment icon #131 Posted by StarMountainKid on 18 June, 2014, 4:00
About terraforming Venus, how about floating cities instead. Landis has proposed aerostat habitats followed by floating cities, based on the concept that breathable air (21:79 Oxygen/Nitrogen mixture) is a lifting gas in the dense carbon dioxide atmosphere, with over 60% of the lifting power that helium has on Earth.[4] In effect, a balloon full of human-breathable air would sustain itself and extra weight (such as a colony) in midair.
Comment icon #132 Posted by aquatus1 on 18 June, 2014, 5:58
I would think that was an inevitable step in the process.

Please Login or Register to post a comment.

  On the forums
Amazon boss takes his robot dog for a walk
Tech entrepreneur Jeff Bezos attended Amazon's annual MARS conference with a very unusual companion.
World's last male northern white rhino dies
The last remaining male of the species, Sudan, was put down on Monday after several months of ill-health.
Did a mystic predict Putin's rise to power ?
During a meeting in 1979, blind mystic Baba Vanga allegedly predicted that Putin would 'rule the world'.
New study hints at 'Oumuamua's origins
Researchers believe that it is very likely that the interstellar asteroid came from a binary star system.
Featured Videos
Gallery icon 
Monkeys learn to socialize
Posted 3-18-2018 | 0 comments
These young vervet monkeys must learn to socialize before being released in to the wild.
Why don't birds get frostbite ?
Posted 3-16-2018 | 0 comments
How do birds stop their legs from getting frostbitten during freezing temperatures ?
Most straws in a beard
Posted 3-15-2018 | 2 comments
Kyle Kozemchick stuck 215 straws in to his beard for this bizarre world record attempt.
Michio Kaku on asteroid mining
Posted 3-13-2018 | 1 comment
Theoretical physicist Michio Kaku discusses the possibility of mining asteroids in space.
Fastest people in slow motion
Posted 3-12-2018 | 1 comment
A look at the world's fastest card thrower and an amazing fast draw world champion.
 View: More videos
Stories & Experiences
Three knocks
3-8-2018 | Canada
Two shadows of me
3-8-2018 | Bellflower, LA
I think I know what I saw
3-5-2018 | Near Sultan, Washington
Ghost, or something else ?
3-5-2018 | Ohio, USA
Black hole in Bismarck
2-14-2018 | Mandan
Trapped and chased
2-9-2018 | Saskatchewan canada
Someone calling my name
2-9-2018 | Budd Lake NJ
Strange feeling
1-18-2018 | Different places

         More stories | Send us your story
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.7 2001-2017
Privacy Policy and Disclaimer   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ