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Ancient Mysteries

King Arthur was Scottish, claims academic

September 6, 2015 | Comment icon 26 comments



Was King Arthur really a Scottish general ? Image Credit: Charles Ernest Butler
A 9th century Latin chronicle has shed light on the possible existence of the legendary King Arthur.
While the story of King Arthur, the knights of the round table and their adventures in Camelot have been familiar themes in movies, books and television shows for years, the historical origins of the legend and the real-life events on which it is based have long remained a topic of academic debate.

Now however Dr Andrew Breeze, a philologist and Celticist from the University of Navarre in Spain, believes he has discovered the truth thanks to a 1,200-year-old chronicle entitled "The History Of The Britons" that was written by the Welsh monk Nennius.

The book details nine locations where Arthur was said to have defeated his enemies in battle and now Dr Breeze believes that he has finally determined where each of these places are.
Surprisingly Southern Scotland has turned out to be the site of the largest number of them.

"Arthur thus now steps from legend into history - specifically the history of Scotland," said Breeze.

"He will have been a Briton of southern Scotland, fighting all his battles there; but he was not fighting the English. His enemies were other British peoples, around Edinburgh and Carlisle. "

"He was not of course a king. He will have been a brave general who soon became a legend."

Source: Independent | Comments (26)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #17 Posted by spud the mackem 6 years ago
Forget it all, he was danish, we came, we conquered, we fornicated, hence, he was danish... Your welcome... The only things that Denmark has sent us is Danish Bacon and Butter....(Oh...... and the beer is OK)....
Comment icon #18 Posted by spud the mackem 6 years ago
British history seems to be all about cookery.....First Alfred and the burnt cakes, now Arthur with his Danish........Next thing it'll be Henry Tudor and Welsh rarebit I shouldn't wonder! Yes but who ate all the Pies
Comment icon #19 Posted by DieChecker 6 years ago
He was either Atlantean or an Alien... (just getting it in before the usual claims)... Makes sense if the Isle of Man (Avalon) is Atlantis.
Comment icon #20 Posted by Aardvark-DK 6 years ago
The only things that Denmark has sent us is Danish Bacon and Butter....(Oh...... and the beer is OK).... Hold on ! We send a lot of really crappy footballers too ! And Aqua....
Comment icon #21 Posted by PersonFromPorlock 6 years ago
Forget it all, he was danish, we came, we conquered, we fornicated, hence, he was danish... Assimilated into the Tuborg, eh?
Comment icon #22 Posted by third_eye 6 years ago
okay .. what about the sword ... you know ... ? Excalibur ?
Comment icon #23 Posted by Leonardo 6 years ago
okay .. what about the sword ... you know ... ? Excalibur ? Most mythological heroes come ready-packed with a famous or 'superior' weapon, it's a common device to bolster the claims of the hero to rulership, 'manliness', or to suggest "my hero is better than your hero". So, I wouldn't read too much into the mythological Arthur having a famous sword. As for whether Arthur existed as some historical figure from whom a legend was created, I doubt that was the case. We can look at the history of numerous places around Britain (or even abroad, in Europe) and find figures who could conceivably be th... [More]
Comment icon #24 Posted by Black Monk 6 years ago
Yes but who ate all the Pies The Wiganers.
Comment icon #25 Posted by Taun 6 years ago
Makes sense if the Isle of Man (Avalon) is Atlantis. Why not?... Every place else was...
Comment icon #26 Posted by DieChecker 6 years ago
As for whether Arthur existed as some historical figure from whom a legend was created, I doubt that was the case. We can look at the history of numerous places around Britain (or even abroad, in Europe) and find figures who could conceivably be that upon which the legend was based - but I doubt 'Arthur' was built on any of them. 'Arthur' is an archetype, not a historical figure, and I suspect that 'Arthur-type' legends existed in various of the British cultures which existed before the unification of Britain, and those were subject to being absorbed into successive cultures with modifications... [More]


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