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Nature & Environment

Enormous 17ft anaconda filmed in the Amazon

By T.K. Randall
March 18, 2016 · Comment icon 18 comments



The anaconda is the largest snake species on the planet. Image Credit: CC BY-SA 3.0 Dr. Rukinogi
A BBC film crew has captured footage of a gigantic green anaconda in the Amazon rainforest in Ecuador.
The encounter took place during filming for a new series called 'Tribes, Predators and Me' in which presenter Gordon Buchanan meets up with a hunting family who catch and release anacondas - a traditional activity seen as a demonstration of strength and bravery among the local tribes.

In a remarkable stroke of luck the film crew just happened to be there when the hunters caught the largest anaconda they had ever seen - a 17ft behemoth that took several men to lift from the water.
The enormous reptile provided the team with a wealth of scientific data before being released back in to the wild and is believed to be one of the largest green anacondas ever documented.

A clip from the series, which shows the Waorani hunters catching the snake, can be viewed below.



Source: Inquisitr.com | Comments (18)


Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #9 Posted by BeastieRunner 7 years ago
World's longest at 17 feet? Not a chance. Try 30+ feet. Maybe on film?
Comment icon #10 Posted by Imaginarynumber1 7 years ago
World's longest at 17 feet? Not a chance. Try 30+ feet. There are no confirmed cases of snakes over 25 or so feet.
Comment icon #11 Posted by Darkenpath25 7 years ago
10 feet , 17 feet 30 plus ? there's not enough money in this world to pay me to get close enough to film any snake that big. after seeing that I know I'm going to has some disturbing dreams tonight .
Comment icon #12 Posted by dharma warrior 7 years ago
You'll quite often hear anaconda's referred to as the world's heaviest snake, but very rarely as the heaviest. Keep in mind that a 17 ft anaconda would weigh roughly the same as a 27 ft python. It's the girth dude, the girth!
Comment icon #13 Posted by Aardvark-DK 7 years ago
Agree that the anaconda is the worlds heaviest snake, not the longest. Pythons are the longest, but they are quite slim...just like the relationship between japanese and americans....
Comment icon #14 Posted by Not Your Huckleberry 7 years ago
There are no confirmed cases of snakes over 25 or so feet. After doing more research, you're exactly right and I stand corrected.
Comment icon #15 Posted by fromthedeepestjungle 7 years ago
I am glad they did not kill it at some point they will maybe run in to something very bigger
Comment icon #16 Posted by Zalmoxis 7 years ago
Kick ass. That anaconda could eat a small rhinocerous.
Comment icon #17 Posted by OptimisticSkeptic 7 years ago
There could have been a trophy from that encounter without harming the snake at all. Notice how gray her eyes are when we first see her head, and then how drab and uniformly colored her body is. I would say she was just a couple of hours or less from shedding her skin!
Comment icon #18 Posted by zebra99 7 years ago
There could have been a trophy from that encounter without harming the snake at all. Notice how gray her eyes are when we first see her head, and then how drab and uniformly colored her body is. I would say she was just a couple of hours or less from shedding her skin! And having been shopping with a woman for a new posh frock.... I'd rather be in the company of the snake.


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