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Palaeontology

Gigantic dinosaur footprint found in Mongolia

October 1, 2016 | Comment icon 12 comments



The footprint was made by one of the largest ever land animals. Image Credit: CC BY-SA 3.0 Nobu Tamura
Palaeontologists have identified a prehistoric Titanosaur footprint that is the size of a human torso.
Like something from a Godzilla movie, the enormous footprint, which was discovered by scientists from the Okayama University of Science, dates back up to 90 million years and is so large that it is almost the size of an adult human being.

"This is a very rare discovery as it's a well-preserved fossil footprint that is more than a meter long with imprints of its claws," the university said in a statement about the find.
The creature responsible for the footprint was believed to be part of a group of particularly large sauropod dinosaurs known as the Titanosaurs which weighed up to 90 tonnes.


There is still however much more for scientists to learn about the discovery.

"Specific structural features of this dinosaur make it differ from its relatives, according to what was said in an official release," said Sergei Leshchinsky of Tomsk State University. "We cannot say that this reptile was, for example, sturdier than the others because it is unknown yet."

Source: Sputnik International | Comments (12)



Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #3 Posted by smokeycat 5 years ago
Meters?  
Comment icon #4 Posted by DieChecker 5 years ago
Perhaps that is just a very small paleontologist?
Comment icon #5 Posted by third_eye 5 years ago
sorry ... I was joshing and exaggerating' ... ~
Comment icon #6 Posted by paperdyer 5 years ago
Well they are near Godzilla's stomping grounds. Wouldn't take Godzilla too long. A walk and a quick dip and  TOKYO!!!!!!!
Comment icon #7 Posted by Sameerr 5 years ago
Oh yeah, that sounds good. I love giant sauropods. The thing is, when a giant titanosaur fossil is unearthed, this sentence is applied in some of those news ------ ( One of the heaviest dinosaurs to walk the earth, titanosaurs are estimated to have weighed upto 90 tons.) Many people would want to know about the weight of the newly discovered titanosaur but the news of the recently discovered giant titanosaurs usually is mentioned as 'Titanosaurs could weigh upto 90 tons'. Before a year or so, i sent a message to a paleontologist about the newly discovered giant titanosaur at that time and he r... [More]
Comment icon #8 Posted by Athena1979 5 years ago
Maybe it was a one legged titanosaur, therefore, one footprint. jk
Comment icon #9 Posted by jarjarbinks 5 years ago
Why creatures were so BIG back then and were so small now ?
Comment icon #10 Posted by oldrover 5 years ago
Because they could be is the short answer. As facetious as it sounds, it's actually quite true. There are fundamental differences in physiology between mammals and dinosaurs, which mean they could get much bigger than us. Obviously though that's only on land, once we become neutrally buoyant, as in whales, we beat them hands down.  
Comment icon #11 Posted by jarjarbinks 5 years ago
Why plants were that big, birds were that big, fish, sharks were that big, dinosaurs were that big ?   now everything is smaller ? 
Comment icon #12 Posted by oldrover 5 years ago
  No, it isn't, where are you getting that information from? The largest animals ever to have lived are alive now. As are the largest plants.  It's true that some groups of plants got bigger in the Mesozoic than they do now, but there are other modern species that are larger.  I think the biggest ancient fish was leedsichthys, which was big, but nothing like as vast as is sometimes claimed. In fact its maximum was probably around 50ft. Today, the whale shark tops out at around 40. Smaller, but not by that much. And not as much as some sources claim.  The biggest birds, both flighted and flight... [More]


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