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New device can draw water out of thin air

Posted on Friday, 14 April, 2017 | Comment icon 18 comments

Could a simple device solve the world's drinking water problems ? Image Credit:
Scientists may have found a way to provide millions of people around the world with fresh water.
Developed by a team of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of California, Berkeley, the prototype system is able to convert humidity in the air in to liquid water using a special metal-organic framework that traps air inside tiny pores.

When sunlight heats it up the water molecules trapped inside are released and condensed - producing several liters of water on average every twelve hours.

"It takes water from the air and it captures it," said MIT mechanical engineer Evelyn Wang. "It doesn't have to be this complicated system that requires some kind [of] refrigeration cycle."

"Now we can get to regions that really are pretty dry, arid regions. We can provide them with a device, and they can use it pretty simply."

Source: Japan Times | Comments (18)

Tags: Water

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #9 Posted by ChaosRose on 15 April, 2017, 4:27
I think we need that sarcasm font.
Comment icon #10 Posted by DieChecker on 15 April, 2017, 10:11
Really depends on what the cost (per kilogram) of this new powder would be? And how long (how many liters) can it be used? We could give smartphones and cell towers to everyone in the world, but if they don't upkeep their infrastructure, they'd be worthless. Same here, if the people using the powder can't afford it, or it requires intricatemaintenance, then the technology will fail. If it is too expensive, then it will fail also. I wonder if the cables are there to monitor, or if they are there to add something to the system?
Comment icon #11 Posted by MWoo7 on 15 April, 2017, 10:16
tell us something we don't know ... . . . dELTED !
Comment icon #12 Posted by MWoo7 on 15 April, 2017, 10:35
is fine no problem if you're in nice climes and 60 pounds. . . . idiots COME HERE ! to a hard environment, just like the survivalist vids-kids/zombies, TOTAL ! and I MEAN ! TOTAL BRAIN DEAD# s! to the unimaginable extreme like how are they alive, oh daddy owns ... oh just look in North south valleys , find water , oh this that and start fire(have never tried in extremes WE HAVE come talk jack!), on and on and on and ON! of B R A I N DEAD ARMY SURVIVALIST THAT HAVE NOT BEEN AROUND THE WORLD OR EVEN ACROSS A STATE from the south. Shoud be illegal spouting trip e like that. Will kill people.... [More]
Comment icon #13 Posted by pallidin on 16 April, 2017, 6:31
From the article: "A recent test on a roof at MIT confirmed that the system can produce about a glass of water every hour in 20 to 30 percent humidity." Huh. That's impressive.
Comment icon #14 Posted by DieChecker on 16 April, 2017, 7:48
Well..... Considering that the Sahara desert has about 25% relative humidity, I wonder if their "glass of water", is based off their testing at probably more like 50% to 70% humidity, and they extrapolated? One thing to check, is that the amount of water recovered is directly proportional at all humidity levels, or if it has some function to how much will come out of the air based on the current level. Perhaps desert air at 25% would tend to retain the water regardless? Not trying to disrespect their invention, but trying to be skeptical enough not to just swallow a lemon.
Comment icon #15 Posted by paperdyer on 17 April, 2017, 17:51
So they made a better dehumidifier. If these go to market we'll have people claiming the oceans will dry up because everyone is making the air so dry that evaporation will increase.Which will be good as global warming.....I mean climate change will melt all the ice caps making the oceans rise so more water is available. Wait! That sounds like a perfect solution forglob...I mean climate change! I also predict static shocks will increase and explosions cased by staic sparks where there's too much dust in the air from being too dry. Yeah - we need the sarcasm font.
Comment icon #16 Posted by RoofGardener on 17 April, 2017, 17:56
Scientists at the Paperdyer Foundation may have found a way to provide millions of people around the world with fresh sarcasm produced out of thinair stories !
Comment icon #17 Posted by Hammerclaw on 17 April, 2017, 19:55
One could visualize giant precipitation towers by the hundreds making arid regions of the globe, such as Australia's outback, viable living space.
Comment icon #18 Posted by MWoo7 on 17 April, 2017, 19:57
Has to be a way to use sheets of plastic in giant towers in that way UV protected all that and in the collection cisterns on the side of Mt. KangchenjungaWAQHATEVER !/killimanjaroo? they'd have gravity run piping like the Romans you know.

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